It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Man Violently Dragged Off Plane After United Airlines Overbooks Flight

page: 9
67
<< 6  7  8    10  11  12 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: Aazadan

Which would be distorting material facts to bully someone. Sounds like discovery for a lawsuit.


I never said he didn't have a case. I said that arguing it at that moment is the wrong time to do so.




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:11 PM
link   
a reply to: Aazadan


That's what court is for, to make your case that your rights were violated.


But his rights weren't violated until he was forcibly removed, by refusing to leave the seat he bought, paid for, and was assigned by the airline (and which was not in a confrontational manner).


there is a path in place to make everything right and that path doesn't involve being confrontational.


True, but dude wasn't confrontational. The officers were.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: subfab

originally posted by: yuppa

originally posted by: subfab

originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: subfab

You gonna address the time and money issue? Takes both to fight # out in court. A doc can afford a lawyer but I wouldn't be able to lawyer up and I damn well shouldn't have to.


there was no need for lawyer or court or fees if the passenger listened to instruction by law enforcement.
it could have ended with the passenger contacting the airline customer service instead of dragged out of the plane.

the need for legal representation began the second the passenger fought back against a law enforcement officer.
don't fight, no need for cash for lawyer, no need for court, no need to visit the hospital.



Unless he was suspected of a crime the police illegally detained him. He didnt do anything until he was assaulted first.
Just because its a cop does not put them above the law.


asking a passenger to exit a plane is not the same as detaining a prisoner or arresting a citizen.


They didnt ask People to participate in that computer lottery of passengers. when someone ask for volunteers it means a sacrifice. And Yes it legally IS detaining anytime a cop lays his hands on you. I didnt say arrest. arresting is done while you are detained IF you committed a crime.
Stop defending the LAw enforcement. SHoot even their own Head of that dept is coming down on them.

What if the NAtion called for volunteers to die for them? WHen no one says yes they remove choice. Which is Aginst the COnstitution. It was more a ORDER disquised as a choice.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:25 PM
link   
I hope that this video is a lesson to those who think it is a right to fly. It is not even a privilege. it is business. In business ugly things happen where good are sold and when they are not there bankruptcy covers it or when rules applied it is in the small print. The consumer, you, is the lost common denominator.

In this case I would have been tazed I hate to say. I have been bumped from flights and missed occasions because of it but if you are already on the plane there is NO reason you should be bumped by an 'employee' of the airline.

Poor guy...all he wanted to do was get home.
edit on 04pm30pmf0000002017-04-10T17:26:23-05:000523 by matafuchs because: (no reason given)

edit on 04pm30pmf0000002017-04-10T17:27:01-05:000501 by matafuchs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:25 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

What do you want an intervener to do; get their head cracked open?

Obviously when one buys an airplane ticket they agree that this airline can kick your ass off for any reason they deem fit.

So their is likely no legal recourse for the guy.

And another thing...might makes right in this world



edit on 10-4-2017 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:42 PM
link   
Below is a portion of the Contract of Carriage as recommended by IATA which is used by all major carriers around the world.



DENIED BOARDING: Flights may be overbooked, and there is a slight chance that a seat will not be available on a flight even if you have a confirmed reservation. In most circumstances, if you are denied boarding involuntarily, you are entitled to compensation. When required by applicable law, the carrier must solicit volunteers before anyone is denied boarding involuntarily. Check with your carrier for the complete rules on payment of denied boarding compensation (DBC) and for information on the carrier’s boarding priorities.


The key part of that is "if you are denied boarding involuntarily" meaning the airline has the right to do so. It doesn't say the can drag a passenger off kicking and screaming though. UA agents need to be more tactful in performing their duties.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:53 PM
link   
a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

To Board. He was already on there. That is the big deal here. At the gate is happens all the time. This is where it should be dealt with. This was employees who needed a ride and they are kicking off passengers.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:04 PM
link   
a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

They can only involentarily deny bording according to their own CoC rules (rule 21) before the person is aboard the plane. Once hes in his seat you cant involentary deny bording. Its their own damned rules. They broke em. In a legally binding contract. Obsfucated or straight lied to security so they can bend their own rules to bully and eventually assault someone so they could make even more money.

This us why you are allowed to sue people. United deserves, needs to be, and should be sued and punished over this.

Even the authorities say united and security were wrong on this. They used the word deplorable to describe uniteds behavior and actions today.

It us a big deal. I hope united takes a fat one where the sun dont shine over this.
edit on 10-4-2017 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Edumakated
I agree with all you said except the last part. No , he shoukd not have just got up and left his wife behind. I would have refused as well and why would I expect to be dragged off if I'm not a terrorist or causing a disturbance?

I would have been thinking I'll refuse and hopefully they just find another sucker, that it's not as serious as it all seemed.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:21 PM
link   
I wonder what happened to his baggage already loaded on the plane? Must have had to get his belongings off and delay the whole flight inconveniencing every other passenger.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: SirHardHarry
a reply to: Aazadan


That's what court is for, to make your case that your rights were violated.


But his rights weren't violated until he was forcibly removed, by refusing to leave the seat he bought, paid for, and was assigned by the airline (and which was not in a confrontational manner).


there is a path in place to make everything right and that path doesn't involve being confrontational.


True, but dude wasn't confrontational. The officers were.


The contract was broken though, and the guy had no recourse. The plane could refuse to take off until he leaves. At some point, in order to ensure the orderly operation of the airport, security or police are going to have to force the guy off. He has no leverage in that situation, what is he supposed to do? Force the plane to take off with him on it? Commit a crime by fighting against the officers to stay on the plane?

There's nothing he can do there. The best thing he could do is comply, and sue for breach of contract, and anything else a lawyer would tack onto the charges later. Also, I really hate to say it as I think police use of force is out of control, but at some point the police are obligated to use force to remove the guy from the plane in this circumstance.

As I and other posters have said. When the police want you to go with them, do so. There will be plenty of time in the future to make a case about wrongful treatment, but fighting them on the road side is not a battle you're going to win.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:33 PM
link   
Story doesn't make sense as told.
When you board a plane isn't there someone at the gate that tears off a piece of your boarding pass before giving you the nod to board?
In that case the passenger who arrives late is out of luck.
If this passenger boarded the plane via a fraudulent method that bypassed the boarding pass validation, then the TSA has the right to consider them a possible threat and remove them.
I'm being super picky here, I lost two cans of Tuna in a TSA search the last time I flew so I know they can be a PITA.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: Cauliflower
Story doesn't make sense as told.
When you board a plane isn't there someone at the gate that tears off a piece of your boarding pass before giving you the nod to board?
In that case the passenger who arrives late is out of luck.
If this passenger boarded the plane via a fraudulent method that bypassed the boarding pass validation, then the TSA has the right to consider them a possible threat and remove them.
I'm being super picky here, I lost two cans of Tuna in a TSA search the last time I flew so I know they can be a PITA.


well in this case there werent any late passengers. united airlines needed to get some of their own employees to another location so they were trying to bump people to fit them on the flight. this imo is where UA really screwed up. if anyone is going to have a crappy day let it be the employees, not your customers. if them not making it to their location meant other planes not taking off, well then UA needs to get their house in order so those things dont happen. there was probly a dozen options they could have taken prior to ever bothering a paying customer. from a private charter flight to buying them a ticket on another airline to plopping them on a greyhound bus.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:49 PM
link   
As someone who flies every week I can tell you that I have seen more than one person IDB'd after they have boarded the aircraft. Should this normally be handled at the gate? Yes. Do circumstances arise where it doesn't always happen? Yes.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:52 PM
link   
a reply to: TheScale

Using force doesn't sound like a rational solution in that case.
Perhaps the one probably now ex UA security employee acting on his own made a very bad decision.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:18 PM
link   
This is disgusting and very wrong at every level, the guy was in his seat already, company screw up needs to be on the staff not the paying customers.

Not everybody on a plane MUST be at their destination the very next flight time. It's happened to me, I got bumped to the next day, for various reasons, weather over booking whatever. I plan to always go 1 day early because of this.
If I have a must attend event such as a wedding or a funeral then I have an issue, but that would be going only, coming home I would let them put me up in a hotel for a day no biggie.

The guy was a doctor that needed to see patients, that's pretty important, I would suggest a higher level of vetting by the airline. I would start at the front of the plane and ask each person why they needed to be at their destination faster than what the paid delay would be. If somebody was retired and just going home after visiting with his grand kids, I would say that person could wait a day, compared to somebody that has to be somewhere for work/wedding/funeral or maybe a connecting flight, urgent flight related matters must be considered, randomly letting a computer pick is stupid.

The airline need to treat this like a hospital treats people coming into the emergency room, prioritize by level of importance. If everybody lies then it won't be very effective, however.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:31 PM
link   
He wasn`t violently dragged off the plane, he was (and I quote) " re-accommodated"


I apologize for having to re- accommodate these customers
....Oscar Munoz,CEO, United Airlines

www.thedailybeast.com...


I hope this method of re-accommodation doesn`t spread to other industries like, restaurants, theaters, concerts, sports events, etc, etc.
edit on 10-4-2017 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-4-2017 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Absolutely unacceptable! This passenger had a duty to his patients being a Physician and he should not have been forced off as a paying customer. I'm calling upon everyone I know to boycott United!



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: subfab

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: subfab

It certainly ISN'T a good idea, but that doesn't mean they should have treated him like a spoiled child and drag him out by his wrists.


it would not have happened if he listened to the instruction given by law enforcement.

he can lawyer up and plead his case before a judge. no harm to anyone.
it's how our system is suppose to work.

taking law into your own hands is never a good idea.


Explain to us all that don't understand, why was law enforcement even on a plane that was overbooked?
Where's the crime?



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:15 PM
link   
latest

"One officer has been placed on leave after video of police dragging a passenger from an overbooked United Airlines flight sparked outrage across social media."

abc7ny.com...



new topics




 
67
<< 6  7  8    10  11  12 >>

log in

join