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for those with Mandela Effect . Is the sun blinding white everywhere in every country?

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posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:17 AM
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Morning ATS,

So I've been experiencing Mandela effect for years now ( progressively more evident gradually as I go along here).
I remember the sun being bright yellow/orange.. and now it's blinding white. The whole weather for that matter feels and looks artificial you can say at this point lol.

I was looking at some photos online and I noticed a lot of my friends are posting photos of beautiful bright orange sunsets in places like Jamaica, Hawaii, Dominican Republic etc...

My question for all of those experiencing this blinding white sun Mandela effect is this. - If we went vacationing in those spots with groups who were seeing bright orange sunsets and capturing it on photo, would we experience that orange sun again as well?
Or would the effect still hound us?
This question is a big one, because If it's the former and not the ladder would this prove that this mandela effect can only affect people in certain geographical regions?
I know Mandela effect goes way beyond geographical stuff and It's literally the fact that our realities have changed entirely, but I'm looking to see if there are chinks in the armor of the effect so to speak.

Would love to hear your thoughts
edit on 10-4-2017 by freedom7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-4-2017 by freedom7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-4-2017 by freedom7 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:29 AM
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If the sun seems to be blinding white to me, it´s after i sat too long in front of my screen in a darkened room and smoked too much Haze...


But i really know some people that have problems nowadays with the sun, the sun is to bright for them. But i don´t know if that just are age- and weed-related impressions, or if maybe something with the sun changed.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:35 AM
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The sun has definitely changed. I remember as a kid, the sun was as you described, a bright yellow, orange. Now, it's like an led light and feels like you're underneath a heat lamp if standing outside in one spot for over a minute, if not less. I don't think it's the Mandela effect to be honest, but our planet is definitely changing.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:41 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

The Sun has not changed colour. It is probable that any differences you are encountering between your recollection of the Suns light in times past, and what you are seeing now, is down to several factors, none of them having anything to do with changes on the Sun.

First, atmosphere. The atmosphere is essentially a huge filter, where light is concerned. Its composition in general, and the weather prevailing in a given location, are what dictates how light from the sun gets to the ground, how much interference it suffers along the way. Different chemicals being present in the atmosphere filter the light differently, as do different concentrations of those chemicals. Weather can also play a part in whether or not you can even see the Sun from where you are at the time.

Second, time of year and day. The Sun goes through different appearances as the day wears on, generally speaking. I have personally seen very yellow dawns, red dawns, orange dawns, and the same for dusks as well. The angle at which light from the sun hits the atmosphere, dictates how that light is reflected and refracted through the atmosphere, which in turn dictates what wavelengths of light hit your eyeball.

Third, the intrinsic unreliability of memory. Human beings are notoriously bad at being eyewitnesses. There are exceptions to that rule, the sort of training or genetic abnormality which results in photographic memory or other similar conditions, for example. But for the most part, people cannot be ordinarily relied upon to report with precision, on matters which occurred previously. Some people have difficulty recounting what they see in front of them RIGHT NOW, and others yet, though having the ability to communicate perfectly, simply cannot see beyond the noses on their faces. Human memory therefore is a strange beast. This means that ones recollection of events, and the events themselves, are not always remotely similar, leave alone the same. Ones recollections of colour, for example, can be clouded by the overall emotional situation, whether the memory was one of childhood or puberty, or young adult hood, or perhaps full adult hood. Simply put, the mind works somewhat differently during these distinct periods of life, as well it might, given the difference in chemical activity between them, largely hormonal.

There is a great deal more to the colour of the Sun, than one might first suspect, but suffice to say, that a difference between your memory of the Sun, and the current state of it, is probably a product of one of the factors I mentioned above. Far more likely than an actual difference at the Suns end of the affair at any rate!



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

Is it blinding white at sunset?



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 05:46 AM
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For me, the Sun is only blinding during the following circumstances:

The more hours I work indoors,....

The more I stay inside gazing at the screens of my smartphone, computer, or television,...

The more I stay inside sitting on the couch,....


When I go outside and spend the entire day in the Sun, or better yet; multiple days in the Sun, it begins to look normal and no longer feels blinding bleach-white to my eyes. Being outdoors more than in is the key.



edit on 4/10/17 by Sahabi because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 06:54 AM
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originally posted by: freedom7
I was looking at some photos online and I noticed a lot of my friends are posting photos of beautiful bright orange sunsets in places like Jamaica, Hawaii, Dominican Republic etc...


Er, photos may have used filters and taken at a time of day when the light from the sun is difused by the atmosphere.

I make a habit of walking in sunrise, or sunset, typically over the hills of Wiltshire, UK. My observations are:

1. The sun can be looked at indirectly when it is low in the sky and can be orange, yellow or red. The dust and atmospheric conditions are key.
2. If you look at the sun directly during the day you will be blinded. Don't do it.
3. The colours of my world are rich.
4. Travel broadens the mind.

On the Mandela Effect. Are you talking false memories? The OP is a bit unclear. The Mandela Effect seems to be a coverall expression for all types of personal problems with life.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:07 AM
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Under the right conditions, the overhead miasma from jet exhaust dims the suns light, making the sun 'seem' less bright (because it is).

Under just the right conditions a good weather front and rain storms can wash the atmosphere of the built up particulates, making the sun 'seem' brighter (because it is).

I noticed it too on the west coast.

We have all the time jet exhaust blanketing us, theres been a wonderful bunch of heavy rain this year so far, temporarily washing the sky. I appreciate the bright white sunlight. Thats how it should appear.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:40 AM
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originally posted by: Sahabi
For me, the Sun is only blinding during the following circumstances:

The more hours I work indoors,....

The more I stay inside gazing at the screens of my smartphone, computer, or television,...

The more I stay inside sitting on the couch,....


When I go outside and spend the entire day in the Sun, or better yet; multiple days in the Sun, it begins to look normal and no longer feels blinding bleach-white to my eyes. Being outdoors more than in is the key.




This is my guess - people abusing their retinas, rods & cones far more than in the past.

Try this one: put a red bulb in a lamp at night and sit next to it reading a book for about 20 minutes. Then take a look outside - it'll be the most blue night you've ever seen. I definitely suspect the eyes staring into screens and not spending even an hour, let alone multiple hours, outside.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

We spend more time indoors. If you spent the day at the beach for a couple of days you will notice a difference. Just had this happen to be in vacation. First two days sun bothered me alot. Day 3 on the bright white sun and the glare disappeared.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:59 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

I see the sky being orange at sunset, but as for the sun? but as crazy as this sounds. The weather has been so bad , with record setting days in January of nothing but dark, gloomy sunless days and I've been indoors so much , I haven't even looked . I'll check it out tonight and confirm what the sun looks like


edit on 10-4-2017 by freedom7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

I know many here may believe the Mandela effect can be attributed to false memories. But Some examples are just so far fetched, and it's not just hundreds of people forgetting stuff, it's millions ...

That's a pattern you know?

I just saw that the capital of Australia is not Sydney. Apparently It's Canberra and it's been that way since 1938. So all those Australian open tennis matches in beautiful Sydney where the announcers remarked about how gorgeous the capital was when I was watching many years back? his is ( This is thread worthy)

Did I and everyone else just remember that wrong? There;s something to it, problem is nobody knows what is going on.


edit on 10-4-2017 by freedom7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

My sunsets are nice and orange. But the daylight sun seems to be a lot brighter and "white" as many are describing, I notice this too. Part of me wanted to blame it on possible increased photo-sensitivity as I get slightly older but my eye-sight is still almost perfect, no color blindness that I am aware of.

I used to be able to sit in sunlight and the brightness would never bother me due to my thick long eyelashes (not bragging lol) but now (even with sunglasses) that sun always has me squinting.

I have no rational explanations, but for me, the sun is definitely much brighter lately.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Thanks for weighing in. I may have to give that a try soon




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

Off topic, but I always thought Sydney was the Australian capital.

Canberra is news to me.

This one could be faulty memory on my behalf, but still weird.




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 10:13 AM
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Particulates in the atmosphere play a huge role.
After spending my first 25 years in an urban area, i moved to small town, rural America. One of the first things i found surprising was how bright the sun was. I was from an area where the air pollution, while it was there, wasn't that noticeable. Until you got away from it. Even today, its still dazzling.
The other thing that stood out was the clairty of the water. While fishing the streams around here, you can watch the fish chase your lure. That was unheard of where i was from.
As said earlier, a good rain washes the atmosphere of pollutants and the sun will appear brighter.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: freedom7

Outside of our atmosphere, the sun is ALWAYS blinding white. There is only one color fire becomes at the temperatures stars burn at.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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Northern hemisphere is just coming out of winter so the increasing sunlight should be a welcome change after a harsh winter. Perfectly normal too just as it happens every year around this time.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: freedom7
I just saw that the capital of Australia is not Sydney. Apparently It's Canberra and it's been that way since 1938.


Just because you don't know a fact does not mean that it's the Mandella Effect. People get confused with facts, even tennis announcers. Most people may think the capital of Brazil is Rio de Janeiro, and not Brasilia.

You did not "remember it wrong" you made the wrong assumption, or just did not know.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: freedom7

Outside of our atmosphere, the sun is ALWAYS blinding white. There is only one color fire becomes at the temperatures stars burn at.


Not to get nerdy but stars do not really burn or combust like fire in say a camp fire.
They fuse atoms as in nuclear fusion for example our star combines hydrogen nuclei creating helium and releasing energy.
You may already know this and were just using a generalization sorry for going all nerd alert on you it's a habit of mine that's hard to break.




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