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Why people put their hands in their coat in portraits?

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posted on Apr, 9 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Clasped behind his back holding his elbows? I do that too. Once my dad asked, is it really comfortable to walk that way? Then i noticed.

Hand in coat is comfortable. Arms behind holding elbows..well it is okaaay.



I will google this hidden hand thing many people say it. but i am not sure i understand it.
edit on 9-4-2017 by xbeta because: (no reason given)



Accideent..:-) he says snow :-)

illuminatisymbols.info...

Snowwhite and huntsman. I will look at its lyrics.
edit on 9-4-2017 by xbeta because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: xbeta

Nelson had no choice, but to do it, lol:



Admiral Nelson and Captain Scott were my childhood heroes. They put bravery into my psychological makeup very early on reading about them.

Admiral Nelson had an outstanding military career:

www.nelson-museum.co.uk...


Nelson's Injuries and Illnesses Nelson's first sea voyage was to the Caribbean, where he experienced his first ailment – dreadful seasickness, which he suffered for the rest of his life. Indian Ocean, 1775 Nelson suffered his first attack of malaria, which was so severe that he nearly died. During his delirium he had the famous vision of a radiant, guiding orb and a premonition that: ‘I will be a hero’. June 1777, during recruiting and impressments duty for the Lowestoffe in Portsmouth, Nelson collapsed with another attack of malaria. Nicaraguan jungle, March 1780 Nelson was told that he was suffering from gout in his chest; this may have been a misdiagnosis of the recurrent malaria. 1780, San Juan, Nelson was suffering from dysentery, yellow fever, poisoning (a toxic fruit from the machineel tree had fallen into the water) and pains in his chest. London May 1781, Nelson’s left arm and left leg were troubling him and the fingers of his left hand were white, numb and swollen. Bearing this in mind, it seems a shame that he would later lose his right arm. In 1782, during a voyage over the Atlantic, Nelson and his crew came down with scurvy after having no fresh fruit or vegetables for weeks. The scurvy was a repetitive ailment and in Nelson’s later years he worked keenly to eradicate it amongst his crews. West Indies 1784 a recurrent attack of malaria. The feverish sweating made Nelson's head so uncomfortable he shaved his hair off and wore a wig. On the return voyage from the West Indies in November 1787 Nelson fell so ill with fever that a keg of rum was set by to preserve his body in if he died. Bastia, May 1794, Nelson was almost killed when a huge shower of earth from a heavy shot landed on him. Only days later he was hit in the face by earth and rocks when a shell exploded. He wrote ‘I got a little hurt this morning’, when in fact he had been blinded in his right eye. Santa Cruz in Tenerife, July 1797, Nelson received a musket ball shot just above his right elbow. He declares to his crew 'I am killed!' The ship’s surgeon amputated the dangling forearm and gave him opium for the pain. Half an hour later he was giving orders for the battle, dictating letters and trying out his new signature. A month later he was back in London with an infected stump that led to septicaemia, which can be fatal. Georgian medicine had no remedy for septicaemia, but fortunately Nelson survived. 1st August 1798, Aboukir Bay in Egypt, Nelson had a 'damned toothache' before battle, probably caused by his earlier problems with scurvy, which had made his gums soft and spongy and his teeth loose (Nelson had lost so many teeth that his face had partly caved in). During the battle, he was hit above his right eye by a fragment of shot, 'I am killed; remember me to my wife' he announces. Bleeding profusely, pale and concussed, he carried on with the battle. Immediately afterwards he came down with fever. He told people that his head was ‘splitting, splitting, splitting’ and proclaimed that ‘for 18 hours my life was thought to be past hope….I am weak in body and mind, both from this cough and the fever’. He suffered from blinding headaches for the rest of his life. He also (arguably) displayed some erratic behaviour and errors of judgement after this injury. 1799, Palermo, Sicily, Nelson was suffering from depression, headaches, sickness, indigestion, palpitations and breathlessness, which he believed to be heart attacks. January 1801 Nelson’s doctor was concerned with Nelson’s habit of spending much of the day writing letters with only a candle for light and gave him a green eyeshade, made him bathe his eye in cold water each hour and forbade letter-writing and alcohol. The Battle of Copenhagen in 1801 saw Nelson suffering from ‘heatstroke’ and vomiting; he was convinced that death was imminent. The illness was severe but not long-lasting. Gibraltar, 1802, Nelson wrote to Emma that he was suffering from seasickness, toothache, dysentery, fever, a heavy cold and a numb left hand. About 1pm on 21st October 1805, just off Cape Trafalgar, Nelson was shot through the shoulder and spine and stated: 'I have but a short time to live; my back is shot through.' He died at around 4.30pm.


What a guy!



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 04:09 AM
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Well, here we go.

1. In the the case of Lord Nelson it is because he lost an arm at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.
2. In the case of everybody else, this may help...

Wiki on hand in waistcoats


The pose appeared by the 1750s to indicate leadership in a calm and firm manner.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: xbeta

Probably because they had to hold still for a long time doing the portrait,when you put hands in pocket's tends to relieve stress in shoulders,I have 2 broken shoulders and it is what I do for relief,MO



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:44 AM
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originally posted by: xbeta
a friend of mine was walking next to me the other day asked why i am walking with my one hand in my coat through the buttons. then i noticed. my hand was in my coat. i didnt do it deliberately or for a reason then we talked and we remembered it was in portraits of people in history. do you have any insight why they do it?


I recall in an art history class I took a while ago, that one of the reasons is that the hands are considered extremely difficult to draw and paint, so the artist would have the sitter position the hands in such a way as to either hide them completely or not show the fingers.
edit on 14CDT09America/Chicago03290930 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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originally posted by: booyakasha
Yes it symbolizes the "Hidden Hand" . The hidden hand represents the big money pushers influencing the actions and thoughts of the dumbed down public. They do it to symbolize their power over the brainwashed masses.

Thank God someone knows the truth.

On a funnier side, Napoleon kept his armies hidden so he always hid his armies up his sleeves right under his elbow-ees.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 11:02 AM
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a reply to: pteridine

Thank you for that info! Very interesting!



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: DickBrisket

I noticed today. Not ever right hand for me. My buttons are tied in the opposite way.



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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Started with Masons. Became a trend like other foolish nonsense. Wigs n sheets over head ya know that kind of nonsense.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6








 
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