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Who Dumped These Fighter Planes in the Middle of Nowhere?

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posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: FissionSurplus
Sometimes old jets are used for more than just messing up a landscape. This is in West Covina, California, at Palm View Park, where I played as a kid in the 60s and early 70s. I'm amazed it's still there after all these years. Of course, this one is covered in concrete and painted over once a year, and the inside only has a funky pretend steering wheel, but it was great for pretending. This is a Sabre.



War birds in childrens playgrounds, we have one near here too. Used to play on it when I was a kid, made me want to drop bombs... I since broke all the Gi Joe, army man, warmonger conditioning, it was tough though.

Vasona park playground




posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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I was stationed at Davis-Monthan for 8 years. You can buy trashed old birds at the scrapyards surrounding DM. The best scrapyards are east of Kolb Rd. or just to the south of the base on Valencia Rd. by the Pima Air & Space Museum.



posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

They cracked down in recent years, but the salvage yards are still there. There are all kinds of old planes sitting in them.



posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: madmac5150

They cracked down in recent years, but the salvage yards are still there. There are all kinds of old planes sitting in them.


A good friend of mine still works there; retired AF guy. He canns parts off of the old A-10s to keep the others flying... sad state of affairs, if you ask me. Canning boneyard parts is not a good sign for the fleet...



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Some of those aircraft are in damn good shape though. That's really the whole reason behind the Boneyard tough. A lot of parts for the Hogs aren't made anymore, so they need them from somewhere.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: imitator

I've seen airworthy F-16s, MiGs, and even the A-12 canopy for sale.


How many ex pilots/mechanics have actually rebuilt a military grade jet...I'm sure there is a law against it...but seriously this got me wondering if anyone has actually done it.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: madmac5150

Some of those aircraft are in damn good shape though. That's really the whole reason behind the Boneyard tough. A lot of parts for the Hogs aren't made anymore, so they need them from somewhere.


I was still saddest when I saw my old F-4G "Weasels" lined up on the Kolb Rd fence back in the 90s... they got the "Q" designation, and all died at Tyndall... sad...

The last few are all museum exhibits now...



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep




I'm sure there is a law against it.

Unless you arm it, why? It's an airplane.


edit on 4/8/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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originally posted by: FissionSurplus
Sometimes old jets are used for more than just messing up a landscape. This is in West Covina, California, at Palm View Park, where I played as a kid in the 60s and early 70s. I'm amazed it's still there after all these years. Of course, this one is covered in concrete and painted over once a year, and the inside only has a funky pretend steering wheel, but it was great for pretending. This is a Sabre.



Dang.

We had a jet on a bigass rusty spring that leaned to the side.
If you rocked to hard you'd skin your knee.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:13 AM
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There is no law against private ownership of military aircraft, that I am aware of. For many years, Retired General Chuck Yeager had his own F-16 that he flew out of Charleston, WV.

Of course, the airport in Charleston is named after the man...



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:13 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I mean fully military grade capable jet. Like if an ex engineer or mechanic etc were to decide to restore one completely operational, like an F-16 or something. Obviously an armed one would not be legal, but I do wonder if there are those out there whom have done it.
edit on 8-4-2017 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Very interesting. I did not know that.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

They have the last batch of Thunderbirds F-16s sitting disassembled. They actually bent them, so they couldn't even convert them to Qs.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep

Yeah, well.
I'm not sure AMRAAMs are easy to come by. Even on the black market. Who knows. But it's certainly not legal.


edit on 4/8/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep

They have a civilian demo team built around L159s, and quite a few military aircraft in private hands that fly at shows. You can't get a modern fighter, such as an F-15, but there are a bunch of Korean era aircraft out there flying.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Wookiep

They have a civilian demo team built around L159s, and quite a few military aircraft in private hands that fly at shows. You can't get a modern fighter, such as an F-15, but there are a bunch of Korean era aircraft out there flying.


That's pretty awesome. It's something I've never really thought about till now.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: madmac5150

Some of those aircraft are in damn good shape though. That's really the whole reason behind the Boneyard tough. A lot of parts for the Hogs aren't made anymore, so they need them from somewhere.


True, but when I retired 6 years ago, we "canned" maybe 5% of our parts from AMARC. ( Air Force speak. "Canned" means cannibalized parts. AMARC is the "boneyard" "FMC" means Fully Mission Capable) My understanding is we are now canning 20% from AMARC, and can barely maintain an 80% FMC. That is SAD.

I am so glad I retired when I did...



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

It's what happens when your fighter fleet is in its 30s. Companies go out of business, people stop making parts, and readiness drops.



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:23 AM
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originally posted by: Wookiep
a reply to: madmac5150

Very interesting. I did not know that.


I got to help turn wrenches on a Mig-21 at D-M years ago... Heritage Flight Conference. Privately owned aircraft; and it was a thrill to help get her flying again. Awesome experience.

edit on 8-4-2017 by madmac5150 because: Bad vowel!!!



posted on Apr, 8 2017 @ 12:26 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: madmac5150

They have the last batch of Thunderbirds F-16s sitting disassembled. They actually bent them, so they couldn't even convert them to Qs.


We (Australia) buried our F111'S in the desert I do miss them every year they used to have 2 do dump and burns at night for our river festival,I dont know if our F35's can do that.




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