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First Fossilized Red Blood Cells from a Mammal Discovered Encased in Amber

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posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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About 30 million years ago two monkeys sat grooming each other in a tree , a Tic was discovered removed and dropped to the ground but before it could hit the ground it landed in tree sap , 30 million years later the Tick has reemerged to be described as a "remarkable new find" encased in an amber time capsule.
In itself the Tic is unremarkable but its removal by the grooming monkey punctured the Tic's body so exposing its freshly obtained blood meal giving us the first Red Blood Cells from a Mammal living in prehistoric times.


Picture of the engorged Tic with the exposed blood on its back.


Two small holes in the back of a blood-engorged tick, which allowed blood to ooze out just as the tick became stuck in tree sap that later fossilized into amber, provide a brief glimpse of life in a tropical jungle millions of years ago in what is now the Dominican Republic.

“These two tiny holes indicate that something picked a tick off the mammal it was feeding on, puncturing it in the process and dropping it immediately into tree sap,” said George Poinar, Jr., professor emeritus in the College of Science at Oregon State University, author of the study and an international expert on plant and animal life forms found preserved in amber.
“This would be consistent with the grooming behavior of monkeys that we know lived at that time in this region. The fossilized blood cells, infected with these parasites, are simply amazing in their detail. This discovery provides the only known fossils of Babesia-type pathogens.”


Close up of the 30 million year old blood cells


Part of what makes these fossils unique, Poinar said, is the clarity by which the parasites and blood cells are preserved, almost as if they had been stained and otherwise treated in a laboratory for inspection. The parasites were different enough in texture and density to stand out clearly within the red blood cells during the natural embalming process for which amber is famous.
oregonstate.edu...


It's a moment in time captured by nature as a gift to the future.




posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Fascinating news - I would love to possess a cool amber fossil from the prehistoric era with remnants of life that was around in those days.

What a find - thanks for sharing G




posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Your conclusion lead me to a thought, when can an engorged tick be considered a present to mankind? You, sir, have answered that age old question. Thank you.



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: gortex

When you put 30 million years into perspective, it's quite mind boggling. Cool find



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
About 30 million years ago two monkeys sat grooming each other in a tree , a Tic was discovered removed and dropped to the ground but before it could hit the ground it landed in tree sap , 30 million years later the Tick has reemerged to be described as a "remarkable new find" encased in an amber time capsule.
In itself the Tic is unremarkable but its removal by the grooming monkey punctured the Tic's body so exposing its freshly obtained blood meal giving us the first Red Blood Cells from a Mammal living in prehistoric times.


Picture of the engorged Tic with the exposed blood on its back.


Two small holes in the back of a blood-engorged tick, which allowed blood to ooze out just as the tick became stuck in tree sap that later fossilized into amber, provide a brief glimpse of life in a tropical jungle millions of years ago in what is now the Dominican Republic.

“These two tiny holes indicate that something picked a tick off the mammal it was feeding on, puncturing it in the process and dropping it immediately into tree sap,” said George Poinar, Jr., professor emeritus in the College of Science at Oregon State University, author of the study and an international expert on plant and animal life forms found preserved in amber.
“This would be consistent with the grooming behavior of monkeys that we know lived at that time in this region. The fossilized blood cells, infected with these parasites, are simply amazing in their detail. This discovery provides the only known fossils of Babesia-type pathogens.”


Close up of the 30 million year old blood cells


Part of what makes these fossils unique, Poinar said, is the clarity by which the parasites and blood cells are preserved, almost as if they had been stained and otherwise treated in a laboratory for inspection. The parasites were different enough in texture and density to stand out clearly within the red blood cells during the natural embalming process for which amber is famous.
oregonstate.edu...


It's a moment in time captured by nature as a gift to the future.


Cool find! I am wondering how 2 tiny holes indicate this tick being picked off another mammal. Is that a specific characteristic of bugs picked off by monkeys? Really just wondering because the scientist claims this is what happened.



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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if it wasn't punctured could it have been a fresh red blood cell time capsule?



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

George Poinar says it's consistent with the grooming , don't know if there's evidence for that but I suppose it explains how the Tic came to be in the amber with the two puncture in its body.

I think it's a likely scenario.



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: Vasa Croe

George Poinar says it's consistent with the grooming , don't know if there's evidence for that but I suppose it explains how the Tic came to be in the amber with the two puncture in its body.

I think it's a likely scenario.


Yeah, that's what I mean. I am just wondering how these 2 tiny holes are indicative of that.

On another note....instead of burial or cremation, I am totally going to get stuffed in a 55 gallon drum and have tree sap poured all around me....simply because I think it would be cool if a scientist found me perfectly preserved 20 million years from now and wonder WTF?



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Fantastic and original idea! I'm going to steal it haha.



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 02:06 PM
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originally posted by: xstealth
if it wasn't punctured could it have been a fresh red blood cell time capsule?


Kinda. The half life deteriorates what's there though.



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 02:21 PM
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so in 30 million years the tick has not changed in size or structure?



posted on Apr, 4 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: tribal
so in 30 million years the tick has not changed in size or structure?


Where in the citation does it either state or imply that again? Because I don't remember seeing anything about stagnated tick evolution.



posted on Apr, 18 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: gortex

If the DNA is still intact you can make an Mammalic Parc movie



posted on Apr, 18 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Keep dreaming...it's cheaper.

I bought a small piece of 'Baltic amber with inclusion' this year. It's a nice little thing with a small fly tucked inside it.

Turns out that the bugs are usually slightly broken in the process of being 'fossilised' in amber; it's a good way of judging the authenticity of the piece. They should have broken legs and wings.

Mine's all neat and tidy and probably a good example of a modern East European bug ducked in resin in someone's kitchen. Spliff, vodka and a fine mesh net.

On the other hand, it only cost £12 and it's a small gift for a nephew who might treasure it.



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