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Internet Users To Buy Lawmakers Browsing History In Protest Of Bill

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posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 10:57 PM
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I wonder if someone can spoof the members of congress that voted for this bill IP addresses and get say orders for adult diapers on all there histories.

Or say gun ads for the anti gun bunch.

Or say Maxine Waters looking for property outside calif for when she loses her seat in congress and retires because she no longer wants to live in calif because of the laws in calif.




posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
These crowd funding things are nice thoughts, but they won't be able to buy any senator or congress people's browsing histories. People giving money to these things are getting scammed.
It won't work


Thank you. As I've been trying to explain, ISPs won't be selling individual people's web browsing history.

Also, they've been able to do whatever it is that everyone's up in arms about anyway.

All that happened is new laws were stopped from taking effect. These laws would have required your ISP to ASK YOU if you were OK with your usage being bundled and sold as aggregate data sets. That was supposed to kick in and take effect this year, but was just blocked.

That's what this is, stopping new laws from taking effect.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 12:36 AM
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Lmao and people found it hard to believe when people like Snowden say intelligence agencies can get anything they want from ISP's. Now it appears any man and his dog can also get that information. How this bill ever passed is beyond me, but let me just point out one thing, politicians have a special type of immunity, the ISP's will never release anything damning about any political figure, I'm afraid this money will be wasted.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

There are no "new" laws. No laws were changed either.

What actually happened is some *new* laws that were going to kick into effect were struck down and prevented from taking effect.

We're in the same boat as we always were. The status quo was maintained.

No one is going to be able to buy specific, personal information about anyone else from an ISP. What ISPs can (if they want) to sell is usage reports on broad swaths of people. Say, peak times in the morning when specific neighborhoods use the internet.

Example: "Wow, it seems that urban people use more internet between 6am-10am than rural people".

That would be helpful to an advertiser because they could pay for their ads only during specific times, saving money. They could see if more people use the Playstation Network vs. Xbox Live network in a given area. They could see which parts of town use Netflix more often, or what percentage of people use Mac vs. PC or what browsers are the most popular in a certain demographic.

None of it is personally identifiable information, and it's not anything they couldn't already do anyway.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 12:59 AM
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Well you may very well be correct but that's not the version of events I've heard reported. To be fair though, I haven't really seen much about this, except the h3h3 video released a few days ago, in which Ethan claims the bill in question will repeal a telecommunications rule titled “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services”. I was able to track down the actual bill and it states the purpose fairly clearly:


That Congress disapproves the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016)), and such rule shall have no force or effect.

S.J.Res.34 text

edit on 31/3/2017 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

Thanks for the informative post. Like I said earlier in the thread it was probably bulk data but I wasn't sure how it actually worked. The problem is though 90 percent of people are just going to see the headline "republicans vote to allow ISPs to sell your data" and freak out.




posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

I believe the case may be that the rule had yet to take effect, and this ensures that said rule shall never take effect, and potentially also prevent other such rules from being devised in the future.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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well this is funny.. why don't do something cheaper and free like doing a mass switch-off the internet, clear the browsing history then turn it on?



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

After the healthcare fiasco, it's laughable you think Trump is going to sign the bill. This is an easy win.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

I assume you read the bill? Where can I find it?



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Most popularly searched item: "What do congressman do?"



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: TheWhiteKnight

Not their personal computers I'm sure, and VPNs aren't bulletproof so to speak from my understanding.



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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I feel confident that a much searched item would be "What does ATS think about (insert topic here)".

;-)

BT



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Kettu




These laws would have required your ISP to ASK YOU if you were OK with your usage being bundled and sold as aggregate data sets.


Ask as in:
Click yes to agree and access the internet.

Click No to disagree and pay $1000 to access the internet **. ** Note we are your only provider for fast broadband



The ask thing is just a formality and the appearance of a choice. There is a reason why telecom have consistently been voted the most hated industry yet they all stay in business and keep growing. That only happens when the consumer has no choice.



posted on Apr, 1 2017 @ 12:21 AM
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I just think it's funny how people's perspective changes based on whether their "guy" is in office or not. The 1%? Evil! Wait.. Trump? Oh.. it's ok now. Privacy? Holy crap how dare the NSA do this! Go Snowden! Wait.. Trump's administration abolishes Obama's privacy law? Eh.. no biggie, it wouldn't have really stopped anything anyway.

Those laws actually would have been great. Opting out of options on many sites is hilariously difficult. On purpose, of course. You have to really dig to find the settings for many of these sites to turn off those attempts to do whatever they want with your data. A law that says they have to clearly give you the option to opt out would have been great. Why would the WH get rid of this? Oh.. yea.. because Obama did it, and anything from the previous administration must be abolished, whether it makes sense to do so or not. Because it -proves- your way is better!

Just sheer stupidity.



posted on Apr, 1 2017 @ 02:40 AM
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Stephen Colbert asked on his show the other night, (paraphrasing) 'How could any citizen want the government to craft this bill?' Of course no one would want this, besides the corporations and those lobbying our "representatives". I am not surprised by this at all. Just continuously disappointed in our government and their hegemony with corporate America.

As for what I am doing in response to this... I got myself a VPN for my phone (much easier to do than I thought it would be). I figure it's overdue at this point, what with the NSA, hackers, now Internet companies selling our private info. Lastly the CIA losing its malware, viruses, exploits, etc... to the world makes us all more vulnerable.

The creator of Cards Against Humanity has pledged to buy these histories and doesn't want any donations.

www.distractify.com...



posted on Apr, 3 2017 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

This made me laugh in joy that finally people have come together to think to push something like this forward, good!

If they get the access to do this, we will probably find that majority of those working for the law or government are actually more corrupt then the users. Considering users are always scrutinised as 'maybe' having the ability to do wrong and most likely are, generally math would have it that its probably pretty dark with what they are doing while using their computers.

Generally they will only be able to view web pages visited but a profile could be generated from this data. Finger to the system is always a sign of a good day.


Good post







 
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