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Life in Jesus' Day

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posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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If I were a higher power I would have waited until the development of indoor flushing toilets for my first advent.




posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 01:50 PM
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originally posted by: Miracula2
If I were a higher power I would have waited until the development of indoor flushing toilets for my first advent.


LOL! At the very least, speed up the invention for my time!!!



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

That's what I would have done. I wouldn't even have shown up until gasoline engines.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Sorry about that, my apologies.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

It's all good


If that's the worst I have to face today, I'm a lucky woman!



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

On line or real life? If on line, I feel ya, I get rat packed all the time.

Some people can't handle the truth, some are paid to squash it.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Boadicea

On line or real life? If on line, I feel ya, I get rat packed all the time.

Some people can't handle the truth, some are paid to squash it.


Yup. So very true. It's hard enough trying to express thoughts that are outside the box... it's impossible when others can't even see outside their paradigm!



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

I always have to ask myself, whatever are they even doing here? This is a conspiracy site, more accurately, an alternative media site where we entertain and discuss ideas that fly against the MSM (official story)

Why listen to CNN and then come here to defend what they say, unless they are also here to bury the truth the same way.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Boadicea

I always have to ask myself, whatever are they even doing here? This is a conspiracy site, more accurately, an alternative media site where we entertain and discuss ideas that fly against the MSM (official story)


I don't get it either. I suspect there are almost as many reasons as there are those doing it...


Why listen to CNN and then come here to defend what they say, unless they are also here to bury the truth the same way.


Yeah, at some point we have to face that truth. It's hard to know just how many though because some folks just like to think they're the sharpest tool in every shed (because they're the bestest at memorizing the mainstream drivel), and there are always those quite willing to play follow the leader. Ever notice how it starts with just one or two people and then suddenly folks are coming out of the woodwork to pile on?

I don't even try to figure it out. In the end, we've just gotta state our truths -- and our theories -- and be our best.




posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 04:06 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Good info.

I would suggest also reading Bill OReilly's book: Killing Jesus - very descriptive book detailing the lives of people and how the Romans were in charge of Judea.

Written with an unbiased point of view.

I can see why it is on the NYT Best Seller list.

Most people are not aware (as I) but at the time of Jesus's birth (March/April time frame) there were 2 Bethleham's at the time, one is a run down city with little to no population approx 6 miles from the temple and the other one which is approx 100 miles away....

Jesus was circumsized in the Temple at eight days old..... so..........which Bethleham was he born in?

Before anyone wants to argue ..... best to check out the two Bethleham story.....



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 04:17 AM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
a reply to: dffrntkndfnml


It strikes me novel that the people back then started the day at sundown.I can't remember learning that in Sunday school.I wonder if this is considered common knowledge?


What an intriguing observation -- thank you! I did quick search and apparently it's because the Torah refers to night before day, so the "clock" begins at sundown -- the beginning of night.

I don't remember it being taught in Sunday School either; nor in regular school. So I'm not sure where/how most people would even know -- much less be common knowledge. Maybe others will weigh in?

I first learned of it while reading theories about Jesus' true exact birth date, as it was necessary to know this fact in order to properly understand the Biblical passages pertaining to the time of Jesus' birth.



I believe Jesus was born in 5 BC and not 0. You can thank Julius Caesar for screwing up the calender.

Romans were excellent record keepers....life and time of King Herod (can not be disputed) and when he issued the slaughter of all boys two years old and earlier for Bethlehem. This order was given PRIOR to 1 BCE because King Herod died in 1 BCE..... meaning Jesus was born before 1 BCE.

King Herod was especially known for his cruelty, why even Caesar himself is quoted saying. "It is better to be King Herod's pigs than his sons."

The day ends at sunset. One day is from sunset to sunset.

The true Sabbath starts Friday evening until Saturday evening.

Sunday is the first work day of the week.


edit on 31-3-2017 by DeathSlayer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: DeathSlayer

Thank you for all the information!

I have heard there was a second Bethlehem, and did check it out on the web once. If I remember correctly, the southern Bethlehem was in Judea, and the northern Bethlehem was in Assyria? I actually re-read the accounts of the birth of Jesus with the second Bethlehem in mind, and it all made perfect sense. In fact, better sense than the Judean Bethlehem.

I will have to read O'Reilly's book now. It sounds very intriguing. I have a book called "Politics of the Crucifixion," by Glenn Kimball, which was a quick read but quite interesting. Now I'm looking forward to reading "Killing Jesus."

Thank you again!



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: DeathSlayer


King Herod was especially known for his cruelty, why even Caesar himself is quoted saying. "It is better to be King Herod's pigs than his sons."


He got his in the end... it's sure hard to feel sorry for him, but I wouldn't wish that on anyone!



posted on Mar, 31 2017 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: DeathSlayer




I believe Jesus was born in 5 BC and not 0. You can thank Julius Caesar for screwing up the calender.
You might find this vid for the date of the birth



posted on Apr, 2 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea
Well since we're sharing links that are teaching history anyway:
Life in Bible Times—The Shepherd



“Like a shepherd he will shepherd his own drove. With his arm he will collect together the lambs; and in his bosom he will carry them.”—ISAIAH 40:11.

SHEPHERDS are mentioned dozens of times throughout the Bible, from the first book, Genesis, to the last, Revelation. (Genesis 4:2; Revelation 12:5) Great men such as Abraham, Moses, and King David were shepherds. The psalmist David beautifully expressed the responsibilities and concerns of a good shepherd. And a psalm ascribed to Asaph mentions David as a shepherd over God’s people of ancient times.—Psalm 78:70-72.

Later, in Jesus’ day, shepherding was still a vital occupation. Jesus referred to himself as “the fine shepherd” and often used the qualities of a good shepherd to teach important lessons. (John 10:2-4, 11) Even the Almighty, Jehovah God, is likened to “a shepherd.”—Isaiah 40:10, 11; Psalm 23:1-4.

What kinds of animals did a shepherd care for? What did his job involve? And what can we learn from those hard workers?

Sheep and Goats

Shepherds in ancient Israel likely worked with, among others, the broadtail Syrian variety of sheep, which have large fatty tails and a thick fleece. The rams of this breed are horned, and the ewes are not. These docile animals are easily led and completely at the mercy of their environment and predators.

Shepherds also cared for goats. The goats were uniformly black or brown. Their long, flapping ears easily got torn on thorns and briar bushes as they clambered on rocky hillsides and grazed on shrubbery.

The shepherd faced the ongoing challenge of teaching the sheep and goats to obey his commands. Even so, good shepherds took tender care of the animals in their charge, even giving them names to which they would respond.—John 10:14, 16.

The Seasons of the Shepherd

In spring, each day a shepherd might take his flock from a pen near his home to graze on the fresh, succulent growth in the nearby village pastures. During this season, the birth of lambs and kids would expand the size of the flock. At that time, workers would also shear the winter fleece from the sheep, and this was an occasion to celebrate!

A villager might own only a few sheep. So he would hire a shepherd who would add the small flock to another one. Hired shepherds had a reputation for showing less concern for the animals of others than for their own.—John 10:12, 13.

After the fields near the village were harvested, the shepherd would allow his sheep to graze on new shoots and on grain left among the stubble. When summer heat set in, shepherds moved their flocks to cooler pastures on higher ground. For days on end, shepherds would work and sleep outdoors, allowing the flock to graze on the steep green slopes and spending the nights guarding the open sheepfolds. At times, the shepherd might shelter his flock overnight in a cave, where they would be protected from jackals and hyenas. If the howl of a hyena panicked the flock of sheep in the dark of night, the shepherd’s calm reassuring voice would still them.

Each evening, the shepherd counted the sheep and checked the health of the animals. In the morning, he would call, and the flock would follow him to the pasture ground. (John 10:3, 4) At midday, shepherds led the animals to cool pools of water to drink. When the pools dried up, the shepherd guided them to a well and drew water for them.

Toward the end of the dry season, a shepherd might move his flock to the coastal plains and valleys. When the cold rains began, he would lead them back home to winter indoors. Otherwise, the animals could perish outside in the lashing rains, hailstorms, and snow. From November till spring, shepherds would not graze their flocks outdoors.
Equipped for Work

The shepherd’s clothing was simple but robust. To protect him from rain and the frigid night air, he may have worn a mantle made of sheepskin, with the fleece turned inward. Against his skin, he wore a tunic. Sandals protected his feet from sharp rocks and thorns, and he wrapped his head in a woven woolen cloth.

The shepherd’s equipment usually included the following: A scrip, or leather bag, that contained food supplies, such as bread, olives, dried fruit, and cheese; a rod, which was a formidable weapon, usually three feet (1 m) long with sharp slate embedded in the bulbous end; a knife; a staff, which the shepherd leaned on while walking and climbing; a personal water container; a collapsible leather bucket for drawing water from deep wells; a sling, which he used to lob stones near the straying sheep or goats to frighten them back to the flock or to drive off prowling wild animals; and a reed pipe, which he played to entertain himself and to soothe the flock.

In return for the shepherd’s care, the animals provided the necessities of life—such products as milk and meat for the table. The fleece and skins were used as a medium of exchange and for clothing and bottles. Goat’s hair was spun into cloth, and both sheep and goats were used for sacrifices.

A Model to Follow

Good shepherds were diligent, dependable, and brave. They even risked their lives to protect the flock.—1 Samuel 17:34-36.

Little wonder, then, that Jesus and his disciples used the shepherd as a model for Christian overseers. (John 21:15-17; Acts 20:28) Like a good shepherd in Bible times, congregation overseers today strive to “shepherd the flock of God in [their] care, not under compulsion, but willingly; neither for love of dishonest gain, but eagerly.”—1 Peter 5:2.

Some more about "Life in Jesus' Day":
Jesus' Life in Nazareth | Life of Jesus
The Life of Jesus—From His Birth to His Death | Bible Stories
Jesus—The Way, the Truth, the Life Book | Life of Jesus
Life in Bible Times—The Fisherman —
Burial Preparations of the First-Century Jews | Did You Know?
The Synagogue—Where Jesus and His Disciples Preached
Why Does Jesus Condemn the Pharisees? | Life of Jesus (this one is about hypocrisy of those who claim to believe in and/or serve God)



posted on Apr, 2 2017 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: whereislogic

Thank you! I enjoyed reading the excerpt you posted, and now I look forward to reading the other links you posted.

Thank you -- much appreciated



posted on Apr, 3 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Here's a chapter from the book about the life of Jesus with something that I'm pretty sure of you've never heard before:

CHAPTER 7: Astrologers Visit Jesus - Why did the star that they saw in the East initially lead them, not to Jesus, but to murderous King Herod?




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