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Inside Blue Origin's New Shepard flight capsule that will take tourists to into orbit next year

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posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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This looks like it will be a fun trip.


Blue Origin, the rocket company owned by Amazon's Jeff Bezos, has revealed the first images of its reusable passenger capsule, due to take tourists to space next year.

The 'New Shepard' capsule's roomy interior includes seats for six travellers, who will be treated to views from the 'largest windows in space'.

The capsule offers 530 cubic feet (15 cubic metres) of space - large enough for passengers to float freely and turn weightless somersaults.

The include reclining black seats with blue piping, and seats emblazoned with the Blue Origin feather logo.


www.dailymail.co.uk...





Whatever you think of Bezos and Musk, you have to say they're on the cutting edge of technology. Musk is talking about a Neuralink which is a brain/computer interface and also Space X.

The Private space race is on.

Here's a recent article on CNBC.

China's secret plan to crush SpaceX and the US space program


China's breakneck economic expansion may be flagging, but the country's ambitions in space show no signs of slowing down. Alongside ongoing efforts to rival NASA by placing robotic landers, and eventually astronauts, on the moon and Mars, China's government is increasingly looking to its burgeoning space sector to rival U.S. companies like Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin and Elon Musk's SpaceX, which is targeting March 30 for the latest launch of its Falcon 9 rocket.


www.cnbc.com...

Space tourism is here and we live in some exciting times in terms of technology.




posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 09:27 PM
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a reply to: neoholographic

Pretty, but glass, pressurized from within and struck by fast-moving debris has particular mechanical failure issues.




posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 10:31 PM
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Cool idea. The skeptical part of me says the "glass" is made of 10k video monitors



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 02:20 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: neoholographic

Pretty, but glass, pressurized from within and struck by fast-moving debris has particular mechanical failure issues.


And reading is your friend too

Every seat on the flight will have access to a large window, which the company says is made of multiple layers of fracture-tough materials.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 05:05 AM
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a reply to: neoholographic


Blue Origin, the rocket company owned by Amazon's Jeff Bezos, has revealed the first images of its reusable passenger capsule, due to take tourists to space next year.


2018 will go by and the thing will still be on the ground.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 07:05 AM
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Taking note, I really want this whole space tourism stuff to take off so I can put the Flat Earth theory to rest. Let's hope this also doesn't get delayed. (and delayed. and delayed) Looking at u, Musk.



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 02:00 PM
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SUB-orbital, not orbital.

This "New Shepard" rocket and capsule that the article mentions could fly next year will only go to 100 km altitude and come back down, making it a sub-orbital flight.

The "New Glenn" rocket would be able to reach an orbital trajectory, but the article say that is years away. Plus, I don't think they have any idea for an estimated date that tourists will be taking orbital flights launched by the "New Glenn" launch vehicle.



Edit to add --
By the way, I don't think the names "New Shepard" and "New Glenn" are accidental.

Alan Shepard was the first American in space, but his flight was sub-orbital -- just like the flights of the "New Shepard" rocket and capsule.

John Glenn's flight came after Shepard's but he was the first American to orbit -- just like the flight of the "New Glenn" rocket.


edit on 2017/3/30 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 07:52 PM
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oh god i hate this another way to rich assholes to shown how they are better than everyone



posted on Mar, 30 2017 @ 10:53 PM
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Well, the sub-orbital flight is the only explanation for those large windows. They'd be a real trouble in Low Earth Orbit.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

I realise you're one of the more ignorant members, thinking that 'organic matter' meant some sort of baryon made of organics, as though this was the same as organic chemistry and compounds, But you do realise a suborbital flight could go as far away from the earth as it likes, so long as it does not make a full orbit, but has a periapsis at least into space, i.e. to the height of low earth orbit?
edit on 11-4-2017 by Subterranean6 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-4-2017 by Subterranean6 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-4-2017 by Subterranean6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: humanoidlord
oh god i hate this another way to rich assholes to shown how they are better than everyone


Wouldn't it be nice if they raffled off a seat now and again and gave the proceeds to charity?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 08:51 AM
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originally posted by: Subterranean6
a reply to: wildespace

I realise you're one of the more ignorant members, thinking that 'organic matter' meant some sort of baryon made of organics, as though this was the same as organic chemistry and compounds,

I'm not sure what you exactly mean by this, considering wildespace did not mention organic matter in his post, so I assume you are talking about some other post from him. However, from my experience with wildespace on ATS, he (or she) seems to understand what "organic molecules" means. I would NOT characterize wildespace as ignorant on this or many other ATS topics...


...But back to the topic of this thread:

originally posted by: Subterranean6
... But you do realise a suborbital flight could go as far away from the earth as it likes, so long as it does not make a full orbit, but has a periapsis at least into space, i.e. to the height of low earth orbit?

The Shepard One spacecraft cannot reach the altitudes of low Earth orbit, even on a suborbital flight.

Low Earth Orbit (LEO) begins at roughly 100 miles (160 km) up. The Shepard One vehicle can only reach a altitude of 60 miles (100 km), which is below the altitude of what is considered to be LEO.


edit on 2017/4/13 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)




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