It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

In historic break, Britain gives formal notice it is leaving the European Union

page: 1
7
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 06:52 AM
link   
In historic break, Britain gives formal notice it is leaving the European Union

A little over nine months after British voters chose to withdraw from the European Union, Britain took a decisive — and likely irreversible — step Wednesday toward leaving a partnership that has bound the country to the continent for nearly half a century.

With the simple handoff of a letter in Brussels in the early afternoon, the British government became the first country to ever trigger Article 50 — the mechanism by which nations can exit the European Union.

The move instantly plunged both Britain and the 27 other E.U. nations into two years of what will almost certainly be messy and acrimonious negotiations over the terms of divorce.

Well it's started. Brexit begins.

For both sides, the stakes are enormous.

Britain could be forced to reorient its economy — the world’s fifth largest — if it loses favorable terms with its biggest trade partner. It also may not survive the departure in one piece, with Scotland threatening to bolt.

Britain may not like this choice as much as they originally thought they would as they are about to shoulder TONS of costs and lose a bunch of EU benefits. And Scotland wants none of this.

Speaking of Scotland. Scotland and Ireland want nothing to do with this:

Scotland’s semiautonomous parliament voted on Tuesday to seek another independence referendum. Advocates argue that an E.U. departure against the will of Scottish voters has sufficiently changed the calculus since the last independence vote, in 2014, that a new one is justified.

Irish nationalists in Northern Ireland have also used Brexit to renew their decades-long efforts to break away from Britain.

And Europe is standing strong against Britain. Expect them to dump most of the costs into Britain's lap. Not that Britain can complain. They are the ones leaving.

Europe has taken an unusually united stand in asserting that Britain won’t be able to secure a better deal than the one it has today. If it does, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other stalwart defenders of the E.U. fear that Britain could be just the start of a broader unraveling.


If Britain and the E.U. can’t come to terms on a new trade deal before the deadline, the two sides would revert to World Trade Organization rules for exchanges across the English Channel. In practice that means significantly higher tariffs, and likely economic harm to both sides.

I really think that Britain has cut off its nose to spite its face here, but it looks like this is the point of no return and it has just passed. I feel sorry for the Brits who voted against this. As well as Ireland and Scotland. Good luck guys.
edit on 29-3-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)


Additional link:
Brexit Day LIVE: Article 50 officially triggered as ambassador Tim Barrow presents Theresa May's historic letter to Brussels
edit on 29-3-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



+5 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 06:55 AM
link   
The EU is in the process of collapsing, and by now too many dominoes have fallen to stop it. Getting out now, before the exits become crowded, is the smart thing to do. Good job, UK



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 06:57 AM
link   
a reply to: AndyFromMichigan

You realize this may backfire on the UK and cause THEIR economy to collapse instead right? Their country is literally about to tear itself apart if Scotland and Ireland break.
edit on 29-3-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)


+15 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 06:58 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

If The U.S. had to abide by rules drawn up by say Canada or Mexico would you be happy?

Britain want's it's sovereignty back. We want to rule our own destiny, as we did until 44 years ago.

What's your problem with that ?



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 06:59 AM
link   
The 1% can only take so much before the 99% start revolting. Brexit, a Trump presidency, Le Pen, ... is a close to a revolution we can have these days. May the EU, NATO and every other global power structure crumble under their own corruption.

Order out of chaos has been their philosophy, let's hope this time the order (post chaos) benefits everyone, instead of the lukcy few at the top.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:00 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

I think it'll be good for Britain. For one thing, they send over 12 billion to the EU annually and now they can keep that money. I hope it all works out for them.

Why does Scotland want to leave the UK? Would they re-join the EU?



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:00 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

Today is a great day. We have started to break away fron the EU. I see great things ahead, some short term pain but then great gains.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:01 AM
link   
I am still happy with leaving this union, I do not have a say in who becomes an MEP so they can keep their 1%ers club, everything else at this moment in time is just specualtion.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: Krazysh0t

If The U.S. had to abide by rules drawn up by say Canada or Mexico would you be happy?

If you look at the EU as a collection of States then I can argue that is already the case since the US is a collection of states with their own governments governed by a central authority.


Britain want's it's sovereignty back. We want to rule our own destiny, as we did until 44 years ago.

What's your problem with that ?

I just assumed you guys liked having a prosperous economy like the rest of the world.


+3 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:02 AM
link   
Scotland, as part of the UK will do what Parliament as a whole decides.

As for the costs and benefits from EU membership, in pure pounds sterling (Or euros) The UK sends more money to the EU than ever comes back, so, no, arguments about EU subsidies don't bear scrutiny.

Now, as to whether the EU want's to try and punish us for exercising our democratic rights, that raises the question as to whether the EU is this benevolent collection of civilised nations or an undemocratic, nasty little dictatorship that cares nothing for either it's former citizens nor those who remain as putting blocks in the way of trade will have very real consequences for the citizens of the EU that rely on the UK as an export market.


+6 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:03 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

Its about bloody time that letter was sent, its been 9 months since the referendum.

Thank you Mrs May for finally doing it.

As a reminder to all the Remoaners who harp on about hard or soft Brexit and all the #e in between ........ the original question on the ballot paper was :-

Should the UK remain in the EU (options were Yes or No)

Nothing there about hard or soft and nothing in there about Scotland, N Ireland, Wales or England as individuals.

The MAJORITY of the UK citizens voted NO
edit on 2017-03-29T07:04:29-05:002017Wed, 29 Mar 2017 07:04:29 -0500bWednesday0403America/Chicago177 by corblimeyguvnor because: typo



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:04 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

More links and info:
race for a 60-Billion Euro Brexit Battle

Like many a divorce, the U.K.'s separation from Europe threatens to get bogged down over money. While the U.K. wants to focus straight away on building a post-European Union identity, for the EU the first order of business will be the 60 billion euros ($64 billion) the bloc says Britain owes it.

So to start with Britain is going to shoulder a BUNCH of new debt for this decision.


The EU says that Britain owes money for civil-service pension liabilities, projects already underway, loan guarantees and other unpaid budget commitments. While 60 billion euros is the top estimate, even the lowest figure I've seen mentioned by any EU official comes to 40 billion euros -- about the same as total U.K. central government spending on education each year.

That EU demand for money is bound to lead to an awkward conversation. One piece of propaganda used by the pro-Leave camp in the referendum campaign was the claim that Britain's EU contributions could be diverted instead to the National Health Service. "We send the EU 350 million pounds a week," was the slogan emblazoned on the side of a campaign bus. "Let’s fund our NHS instead."

That implicit pledge of more money for the health service was swiftly abandoned once the referendum was over. That claim was always absurd; it didn't take into account that Britain gets a rebate, which is applied straight away (or indeed any of a number of other EU payments that would stop).


+3 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:04 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

Our economy won't collapse. We're British. Believe it or not, that actually means something to the rest of the world.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:07 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

One source, you could equally find others that say we will owe nothing. (For a start, that source doesn't take into account all the money we have tied up in the ECB and the property that we helped finance).



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:07 AM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Which is? I can't remember the last time I thought to myself. "Man I REALLY want to buy British stuff today." There are a few economies outside of the US that I think that thought for, but never Britain (ex: Japan, Mexico, Canada, S. Korea, Germany). What do you guys produce again?
edit on 29-3-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:10 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

Yes. Well, like personal debt, we will pay it and pick up the pieces afterwards.

They can threaten us all they like but we're leaving. Sometimes the most difficult decisions are the best ones for the future.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: SprocketUK
a reply to: Krazysh0t

One source, you could equally find others that say we will owe nothing. (For a start, that source doesn't take into account all the money we have tied up in the ECB and the property that we helped finance).

Well it's still being negotiated, but all the countries remaining in the EU are looking like they want you guys to pay. So you COULD find a source saying you won't pay, but that sounds more like wishful thinking to me.


+6 more 
posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Which is? I can't remember the last time I thought to myself. "Man I REALLY want to buy British stuff today." There are a few economies outside of the US that I think that thought for, but never Britain. What do you guys produce again?


Some of the best, most lethal weapons systems in the world.
The most recognisable, luxury cars.
Some of the best, bleeding edge IT and scientific stuff.
Tweed, lots of tweed.
The sort of shoes that will last you a life time.
Beef that tastes like it was raised in heaven and won't give you cancer because it is full of hormones and stuff.
Beer to die for.
Wine that even the French buy now.
Whisky, Gin and a whole bunch of other stuff that you can use to dull the pain of not being British.

A bunch of other stuff I can't be bothered to quote because it's such a lovely day and I want to enjoy my tea.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:12 AM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes
While the US has its own problems with Trump, I'm glad I'm not you guys. I'm not entirely sure you guys understand the bumpy ride y'all are in for.



posted on Mar, 29 2017 @ 07:13 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t




just assumed you guys liked having a prosperous economy like the rest of the world.


Britain survived and in fact did really well before we joined the E.U. In fact it was The EEC we joined, which was nothing like what The E.U had become.




If you look at the EU as a collection of States then I can argue that is already the case since the US is a collection of states with their own governments governed by a central authorit



You have the luxury of voting for your president.

We don't. The President Of The E.U. is imposed on us.




top topics



 
7
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join