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Prison Labor is Slave Labor

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posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:21 PM
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"American slavery was technically abolished in 1865, but a loophole in the 13th Amendment has allowed it to continue “as a punishment for crimes” well into the 21st century. Not surprisingly, corporations have lobbied for a broader and broader definition of “crime” in the last 150 years. As a result, there are more (mostly dark-skinned) people performing mandatory, essentially unpaid, hard labor in America today than there were in 1830."

returntonow.net...

I'm so sick of all you so called Christians turning your backs are the real problems of this country. You can't tell me having corporate prison labor in this country is not the most anti-American and most immoral thing you've ever heard. I'm so tired of you spineless moral high grounders turning your back on the real problems in this country. How can we allow for-profit prisons? How can we allow prisoners to be used as labor? It's pure insanity beyond my imagination! Prison labor is like something out of Auschwitz but with black people who's only crime is they smoke marijuana. Are you kidding me?????




posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Chain gangs are part of American history.
It keeps them active and gives them something productive to do.

Pro tip for avoiding prison labor: Don't go to prison. I know it's a crazy idea, but hundreds of millions of Americans do it every day.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

from my experience there are two types of labor in prison, and neither can be classified as slave labor. Slave labor is working people for no pay towards a profitable purpose.

The first type of prison labor commonly used is hard labor, which people are still sentenced to (especially in the military). Since this is their punishment, it cannot thus be said to be slave labor, and typically there is no actual point to the labor other than it being done (i.e. ~ dig a hole and fill it back up).

The second type is voluntary paid (yes very low wages, but still paid) work that typically gets prisoners earned time off their sentence.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015




It's pure insanity beyond my imagination! Prison labor is like something out of Auschwitz but with black people who's only crime is they smoke marijuana. Are you kidding me?????


False equivalence much?

While I do think it is morally wrong to profit off of prisons, what is even more in the wrong is the fact that there is almost zero rehabilitation. Prisons foster the worst in people and breed some of the worst mental conditions imaginable.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:31 PM
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So, would you prefer that we put murderers, rapists and pedophiles in 5 star hotels so we don't hurt anyone's feelings?

Evil is real. And we have to do something with these people who are convicted criminals. They cannot just rot in cells all day with nothing to do.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:31 PM
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Those guys are not in prison for jaywalking. They're in prison because of violent crimes against fellow citizens, usually the same color they are. You may as well let them make license plates while they're there.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Those guys are not in prison for jaywalking. They're in prison because of violent crimes against fellow citizens, usually the same color they are. You may as well let them make license plates while they're there.


"Amount spent annually in the U.S. on the war on drugs: More than $51,000,000,000

Number of arrests in 2015 in the U.S. for drug law violations: 1,488,707
Number of these arrests that were for possession only: 1,249,025 (84 percent)
Number of people arrested for a marijuana law violation in 2015: 643,121
Number of those charged with marijuna law violations who were arrested for possession only: 574,641 (89 percent)
Number of Americans incarcerated in 2014 in federal, state and local prisons and jails: 2,224,400 or 1 in every 111 adults, the highest incarceration rate in the world

Proportion of people incarcerated for a drug offense in state prison who are black or Latino, although these groups use and sell drugs at similar rates as whites: 57 percent"

"According to the ACLU’s original analysis, marijuana arrests now account for over half of all drug arrests in the United States. Of the 8.2 million marijuana arrests between 2001 and 2010, 88% were for simply having marijuana. Nationwide, the arrest data revealed one consistent trend: significant racial bias. Despite roughly equal usage rates, Blacks are 3.73 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana."

"Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes — combined"

www.washingtonpost.com... 718e34ccf


It's actually not as bad as I thought:

felonvoting.procon.org...

Still, 20% of the prison labor force is not small number.


edit on 27-3-2017 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:45 PM
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"Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes — combined"


I'm having trouble finding statutes that pertain to drug USE. Plenty on possession, manufacturing, distributing and trafficking but none on use.

I'm not against marijuana by the way but the outrage you have seems to be a little unjustified.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: dfnj2015




It's pure insanity beyond my imagination! Prison labor is like something out of Auschwitz but with black people who's only crime is they smoke marijuana. Are you kidding me?????


False equivalence much?


"Slave labour at Auschwitz used by Ford"

www.independent.co.uk...

"Who is investing?

At least 37 states have legalized the contracting of prison labor by private corporations that mount their operations inside state prisons. The list of such companies contains the cream of U.S. corporate society: IBM, Boeing, Motorola, Microsoft, AT&T, Wireless, Texas Instrument, Dell, Compaq, Honeywell, Hewlett-Packard, Nortel, Lucent Technologies, 3Com, Intel, Northern Telecom, TWA, Nordstrom’s, Revlon, Macy’s, Pierre Cardin, Target Stores, and many more. All of these businesses are excited about the economic boom generation by prison labor. Just between 1980 and 1994, profits went up from $392 million to $1.31 billion. Inmates in state penitentiaries generally receive the minimum wage for their work, but not all; in Colorado, they get about $2 per hour, well under the minimum."

www.globalresearch.ca...



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI



"Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes — combined"


I'm having trouble finding statutes that pertain to drug USE. Plenty on possession, manufacturing, distributing and trafficking but none on use.

I'm not against marijuana by the way but the outrage you have seems to be a little unjustified.


Human nature will not prevent the people leveraging this labor to maximize their profits with total disregard to morality. I don't understand how you can have so much faith in CEOs, that is government, from not being as corrupt as possible!

"Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of state and corporate power." Benito Mussolini


edit on 27-3-2017 by dfnj2015 because: typos



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: dfnj2015

Chain gangs are part of American history.


Chain gangs breaking rocks, yes. But using prison labor to compete with union jobs. Come on, you have to see how that could cause problems. Are you really that much against labor in this country? Or do you just like to see black people and poor people suffer in prison?



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

"You do the crime"
You do the time."
No body promised you free room and board if you are convinced of a crime.
That is as about succinct as you can get in response to your thread title.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Sometimes prisoners can make $0.13 per hour, or as much as $4-something per hour. Either way, the companies exploiting this "demographic" are heartless scumbags trying to make maximum profits off of indentured servitude

one resource....




edit on 27-3-2017 by FamCore because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:59 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: dfnj2015

Sometimes prisoners can make $0.13 per hour, or as much as $4-something per hour. Either way, the companies exploiting this "demographic" are heartless scumbags trying to make maximum profits off of indentured servitude

one resource....





Thank you! When I first read this was happening I immediately had a pit in my stomach. This is pure insanity. Many people died fighting in WWII. This is what they were fighting against!



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Wow. So it's not the corporations running these private prisons who are the problem... and it's not the government critters that make private prisons and slave labor possible... not even the unholy collusion between crooked law enforcement/judges and the prisons... nope! It's those pesky Christians!!!

I can make a case for why private prisons and this involuntary labor is wrong from a Christian, Constitutional and humanitarian perspective.

But why bother? In your omnipotence and omniscience, you already know exactly who every single solitary Christian really is...

Sheesh. This could have been an important and valuable discussion.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 07:05 PM
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would you still complain if prisons turned to public tax dollars? and you paid the prisoners for their labor when they all they get is a free housing, food and free time?



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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Keep your eyes peeled for prison guards being either killed or badly injured in the U.K soon , A smoking ban is due to come into effect in England soon and the law has been changed on what size of packs can be sold tobacco rolling is 30 g packs , cigs 20 pack for the rest that can still smoke .


But if you work in the cooks or cleaners etc you will not earn enough in a week to buy the cheapest pack of smokes , wages are about 7 $ to 20 $ a week depending on the job .

Can you imagine saying to some lifer with nothing to lose , sorry you cannot smoke
one of my friends is a prison officer and has left because of this


Just watch those riots happen



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 09:02 PM
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Yes



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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If someone is in prison for having otherwise violated the rights of a fellow human being, then why do they need to have all their rights respected in turn?

And I would basically favor making prisons a place where prisoners are required to engage in labor rather than do nothing other than sit around thinking up ways to engage in further criminal enterprise while behind bars.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

I couldn't agree more. It's abhorrent to any so-called civilized society. In Massachusetts, for minor crimes and civil infractions, cases are frequently dismissed on community service, which is done through the community service department of the courts. It's shoveling snow, picking up trash, etc.. I had a client who had violated his probation in a minor way and the probation officer wanted him to do 40 hours community service as a punishment for the violation. The probation officer was a young black man, the defendant was an even younger black man. I'm a middle-aged white guy. I asked the probation officer if he had a problem with forcing another young black man to perform forced, unpaid labor. He got the point and withdrew the recommendation.

Another problem I have with all of this is that it takes away actual work from people willing to work. It suits business' objectives so, of course, it's allowed. Another point to be made is that this will all fall on deaf ears. Even liberals today are hard on crime. Fighting for convicts is never rewarded in this country.



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