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posted on Mar, 26 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Rolling over in mostly all animals is an expression of submission in this case perhaps a reaction to being, In the case of the OP the sharks in question were not being fed.




posted on Mar, 26 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

What do you think was in the crate? Why do you think there was a camera there?
It was a shark diving adventure. They use bait to get sharks to show up. One of the sharks that showed up had a hook in its skin.

edit on 3/26/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: Phage


To be clear I was not their and am really bad a reading shark minds but as a teaser to the rest of the content I was able to draw attention to the issue at large.

Parallel in humans abound that can not simply be dismissed as mimicry or otherwise passive responses to a positive reinforcement.

Further...

sharkopedia.discovery.com...

Enjoying the conversation

edit on 26-3-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Mar, 26 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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Sure.
Shark gets a hook stuck on its belly. "Hmm, I have hook stuck on my belly. What am I going to do? I know! There are those tourists who come to take videos of them feeding us every other day. They have hands! I'll just go over and bump into them and they will take the hook out!"



posted on Mar, 26 2017 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Its possible. What specifically motivates you to think otherwise?

The idea of distressed wild animals asking for help is not new Phage.

Do a You tube search on, "Injured wild animals aproaching humans for help".

Its just to many to link to here. But here are the search result...

www.youtube.com...











edit on 26-3-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

I agree with you that animals DO approach humans for help. I have countless examples of it happening to me, and I am not "anthropomorphizing" them.

Animals are far more conscious, aware, intuitive, thoughtful, and intentional in their behaviors than people give them credit for. They are also VERY capable of learning, and have memories.


edit on 3/27/2017 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)


Humans are not so high and mighty above ANYONE else. The great apes, the dolphins, the elephants, the whales, the horses, the birds, the....sheesh!!!........

infact, there is a fantastic ad on youtube right now about how dogs are our best friends......I tried to cue it up but can't find it yet. I'll add if I find it before someone else can link it. Important stuff.

Also, just stream of consciousness stuff here....did you all see the docu on Netflix about the Icelandic Intuition Study thing?


INN-SAAee or something like that?

edit on 3/27/2017 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/27/2017 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs


Thank you looking forward to it.



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 06:41 PM
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Reading this thread made me recall a story I heard once somewhere.

Androcles


the reciprocal nature of mercy.


Just like a lion would stalk/follow a weaker member of the herd, animals are aware of strength and weakness.


I had a neighbor once whose ferocious chow chow's got lose all the time chasing cats. One day I walked them back into their yard and they became friendly to me ever since.



posted on Mar, 28 2017 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: loveguy


That is actually to me very profound....


Not that I would ever recommend taking in a wild animal as a pet.



There are those who do and have been successful in that regard .....





A major problem is how exactly the wild animal in question was separated from the conditions that would have allowed it to function in the wild.

In other words they remember and if those conditions resulted in distress, when they get older it is very possible they could retaliate against, human caretakers. Hypothetically that would imply that a Chimpanzee that witnessed the death of his or her parents and other adult tribal members as a result of poachers. Who's purpose is to kill he adults so as to sell the children can result in a Chimpanzee who at a certain age could harm its human caretakers.


Because
they could actually have remembered what happened.






edit on 28-3-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Apr, 2 2017 @ 05:23 AM
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I think it has less to do with how one raises wild animals and more to do with the fact that they are wild and thus not tuned to us in the same way domesticated animals are for instance. A dog will understand a human's cues, emotions and intent whereas a tiger cannot and thus is prone to misinterpreting signals.



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