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Full Earth view from ISS Cupola Impossible 100 percent Fake

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posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: samara11278

Or are you trolling my thread? Let's stick to discussing the topic shall we.


What, the topic of denial?




posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: WaxingGibbons

Do you see Redbore's image? This is what you would see from the ISS if it metaphorically 'blasted off' and you were in the Capula. As you would increase in Height, the Size of the Round Image you were looking at would distort and details would shrink the center, and the image would Remain round. Only once you reached an altitude you could see "The whole Earth" would the Round object as a Whole start to shirk, until then it would be pushing the details into the center lens, with distortion at the inner edges not including area of land. For example, if initially as the rocket was blasting off you saw something in the "Rightish" pane, it would not immediately flux from the Right pane, to the Middle Pane, and would temporarily not even be part of the image during this flux.

originally posted by: redbore



edit on 25-3-2017 by MacK80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: yuppa

This is what NASA says, posting this for the 10th time,


Images of the earth may seem commonplace, but there are actually very few pictures of the entire planet. The problem, Simmon said, is all the NASA earth-observing satellites are in low-earth or geostationary orbit, meaning none of them are far enough away to see a full hemisphere. The most familiar pictures of the entire Earth are from the 1960s and 1970s Apollo missions to the moon.


This is a trolling thread. You are ignoring evidence. the Photo taken is from a special lense and in conjunction with th especial glass and set up of the CUpola you can get entire earth views thanks to its refraction. EPIC FAILURE OP.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: samara11278

Or are you trolling my thread? Let's stick to discussing the topic shall we.


Oh I have been quite on topic this full time. There are several people presenting data that makes sense and your reply continues to be that it's impossible. Please explain why a photo that includes data out of the main as well as side windows of the cupola would not show the edges of the visible horizon - NOT the hemisphere "full earth" - you are viewing the edge of the area of earth that is visible from that distance and the photo combines data from several windows into one distorted view of the earth as visible from the height of the ISS, not the "whole earth". Rounded edges does not equal hemisphere as you are looking at a spherical object.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: redbore

Wow, this has nothing to do with the situation, it doesn't inolve being too close to a spherical object to get it into view in it's entirety. Also it is a composite.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

Besides that my proof destroys your notion, NASA is lying too when they say you can't get a full view of Earth from LEO?
edit on 25-3-2017 by WaxingGibbons because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: WaxingGibbons

Combining several lens panes is a REAL TIME composite. What's the issue in the analogy again?



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: yuppa
NASA is lying too when they say you can't get a full view of Earth from LEO?


What did they say again?



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: MacK80


Images of the earth may seem commonplace, but there are actually very few pictures of the entire planet. The problem, Simmon said, is all the NASA earth-observing satellites are in low-earth or geostationary orbit, meaning none of them are far enough away to see a full hemisphere. The most familiar pictures of the entire Earth are from the 1960s and 1970s Apollo missions to the moon.


Again.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: MacK80

The issue is that you can't see the entire Earth from 450 km, regardless of lenses, fantasy, drivel and wishful thinking.

Can you look around corners with wide angle lenses? No? Then you can't look past the horizon either. From 450 km the horizon is at 2625 km in both directions. You can't see the full diameter of 12,700 km, no matter how ACME your lens is.


edit on 25-3-2017 by WaxingGibbons because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: MacK80


Images of the earth may seem commonplace, but there are actually very few pictures of the entire planet. The problem, Simmon said, is all the NASA earth-observing satellites are in low-earth or geostationary orbit, meaning none of them are far enough away to see a full hemisphere. The most familiar pictures of the entire Earth are from the 1960s and 1970s Apollo missions to the moon.


Again.


But that says "full hemisphere". We are not looking at the full hemisphere, we are looking at the horizon that is visible from this distance. Again.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: samara11278

So in this scenario, why do we see the Earth as a sphere with space all around it?



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: WaxingGibbons

So the middle sentence?

That definitively to you say's they're saying it's impossible?

Is this connected with your issue of it being round, that makes no sense?

Or the issue it's a full hemisphere? Because to me it doesn't look like a full hemisphere.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: WaxingGibbons

The 7 panes of glass distort where the horizon begins and ends, making it round at any height.

Edit: Another way to put it, is it's 6-7 different horizons.
edit on 25-3-2017 by MacK80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: smurfy

Seems like this is showing the full Earth.



Or least the curvature of the full hemisphere seems to match the curvature of the cupola more or less, or at least the part we see in this frame.

It is impossible for the Earth's curvature to match the 2m diamater cupola from 450 km.


That's showing the bordering of two colours, the bright Earth and the darkness of space, and because it is a fisheye type lens both colours are bent to the shape the lens...where convex meets concave if you like.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

So if that shows a portion of Earth, why do we see space curved around it? We shouldn't see space at all then, the surface would fill up the entire window to the frame.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: WaxingGibbons
a reply to: samara11278

So in this scenario, why do we see the Earth as a sphere with space all around it?


As I have said several times, because the outer windows are at angles to the earth. You are looking across the earth toward the visible hemisphere and it is rounded because this is a round object.

To use my analogy from earlier: Hold a basketball close enough to your face that you cannot see anything but the ball when looking straight ahead. Then turn your head left/right/up/down/diagonally. You will see an edge of the ball (that will look round because it is) as well as your surroundings, in this case, space.

The ball will be close enough that you cannot see the edges of the full ball when you turn your head, but the edges of the visible area - NOT the full hemisphere of the ball.

Say you were to draw a six inch diameter circle on that basketball and hold it close enough that the line you drew was on the outside edge of your vision when you turned your head - you would not be able to see more of the ball than that line. It's the same idea - draw a circle on the earth where the ISS' field of vision should be based on its distance, and you shouldn't be able to see further than that when looking out the side windows because the curvature of the earth will curve the rest of it away from you - but you WILL still see rounded edges because the earth is a sphere.

I literally don't know how to explain it any simpler than that. If you read to understand and not simply to reply, you should be able to see where we are coming from.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: MacK80


The last time anyone took a photograph from above low Earth orbit that showed an entire hemisphere (one side of a globe) was in 1972 during Apollo 17. NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites were designed to give a check-up of Earth’s health. By 2002, we finally had enough data to make a snap shot of the entire Earth. So we did. The hard part was creating a flat map of the Earth’s surface with four months’ of satellite data. Reto Stockli, now at the Swiss Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology, did much of this work. Then we wrapped the flat map around a ball. My part was integrating the surface, clouds, and oceans to match people’s expectations of how Earth looks from space. That ball became the famous Blue Marble.


If they could simply make a full Earth pic from LEO all this time, why go through the above trouble?



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



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