It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I am ordering my 1000 dollar gaming pc build this weekend, does this look like it will work.

page: 4
5
<< 1  2  3    5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 24 2017 @ 11:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: bananashooter
a reply to: Fisherr

What motherboard are you using with that xeon, are all xeons unlocked and overclockable ?


LOL... Don't try to overclock a xeon. The BCLK is the only thing you'll get anywhere with, multiplier is locked. They are actually highly efficient in stock form. If you want to overclock, stick with the K series i5.

Sorry if I spoke ahead of you Fisherr.

edit on 24-3-2017 by DrWily because: Additional comments.




posted on Mar, 24 2017 @ 11:55 PM
link   
I use a Gigabyte UD5 x58 as i have owned it from new. my PC is from 2009

But these Xeons are dirt cheap to pick up now like $50 on ebay.

Only problem is if you don't own a x58 board, its not worth it as they now go for $150/200

But for me it was a easy upgrade. 6 core/12 thread Xeon for $60 + GTX1070.

My Noctua NHD14 cools it no problem, 4.4Ghz all cores 1.295v be running it for 3 years now.

I also don't use a HDD, not had once in my computer since 2010..
All SSD's.. My storage is in a 4Bay connected via USB3.

Hope i can post this link. people are still building x58 systems hehe
forums.overclockers.co.uk...


edit on 24-3-2017 by Fisherr because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:01 AM
link   
"Servers" and "workstations" are totally different animals. "Servers" are designed for the rapid transit of data off of storage devices. I have a Pentium4 server computer that is plenty damned fast, but would SUCK as a gaming platform. It is not designed for it. "Workstations" are the high end machines that guys like "Pixar" and "ILM" use for CGI effects, or that big corps. use to crunch insane amounts of data... those machines are leased, then resold when refurbished. Mucho power for the peso.

And as the good Dr. said... don't overclock a Xeon.
edit on 25-3-2017 by madmac5150 because: My ducks are assholes



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:01 AM
link   
a reply to: Fisherr

And you achieved a 4.4ghz clock with that setup? That's pretty impressive. I didn't think you could get above 4ghz on BCLK alone.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:08 AM
link   
Yea, most everyone can push xeon's to 4.4 on air some run them at 4.6ghz
Even some x99 Board you can get a 8 core/16thread cpu and clock the snot out of it.


My x5670 has multi of 22.
200blkc x 22 = 4400.

www.overclock.net...

You could look up x5650 gaming on youtube.

But like i said, unless you own these mobo it's not worth it.
Just buy a AMD Ryzen.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:11 AM
link   

originally posted by: madmac5150
"Servers" and "workstations" are totally different animals. "Servers" are designed for the rapid transit of data off of storage devices. I have a Pentium4 server computer that is plenty damned fast, but would SUCK as a gaming platform. It is not designed for it. "Workstations" are the high end machines that guys like "Pixar" and "ILM" use for CGI effects, or that big corps. use to crunch insane amounts of data... those machines are leased, then resold when refurbished. Mucho power for the peso.


While that is true when describing the whole machine (workstation VS server), it's not really true when it comes to the CPU itself. Modern CPUs, by design, are multipurpose. For a given architecture, it doesn't matter if it's a XEON or a i7, they will both be able to handle the same sorts of tasks. Server CPUs have a bit more cache and more extensive testing at the factory, but are basically the same thing as their desktop counterparts. The rapid transit off of storage devices is less a matter of CPU and more a matter of bus speed, drive speed, network speed, etc.

Edit: And now I feel like kind of a dick because you praised my earlier comment.

edit on 25-3-2017 by DrWily because: Additional comments.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: DrWily

originally posted by: madmac5150
"Servers" and "workstations" are totally different animals. "Servers" are designed for the rapid transit of data off of storage devices. I have a Pentium4 server computer that is plenty damned fast, but would SUCK as a gaming platform. It is not designed for it. "Workstations" are the high end machines that guys like "Pixar" and "ILM" use for CGI effects, or that big corps. use to crunch insane amounts of data... those machines are leased, then resold when refurbished. Mucho power for the peso.


While that is true when describing the whole machine (workstation VS server), it's not really true when it comes to the CPU itself. Modern CPUs, by design, are multipurpose. For a given architecture, it doesn't matter if it's a XEON or a i7, they will both be able to handle the same sorts of tasks. Server CPUs have a bit more cache and more extensive testing at the factory, but are basically the same thing as their desktop counterparts. The rapid transit off of storage devices is less a matter of CPU and more a matter of bus speed, drive speed, network speed, etc.


I was speaking of motherboard architecture. A server or workstation can both have the same CPU, but, be optimized at the motherboard level for each function. A server computer motherboard, would be over-taxed trying to drive a modern video card... they just aren't built for it. The graphics card in my server computer is an old 16-bit card. It doesn't need high end graphics. It's not built for it... yet is very fast at data transfer/routing. It is an older Pentium4, but, it is perfect for what it was designed for.

A workstation would be a piss-poor server, and vice-versa. Two different animals.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:36 AM
link   

originally posted by: DrWily

originally posted by: madmac5150
"Servers" and "workstations" are totally different animals. "Servers" are designed for the rapid transit of data off of storage devices. I have a Pentium4 server computer that is plenty damned fast, but would SUCK as a gaming platform. It is not designed for it. "Workstations" are the high end machines that guys like "Pixar" and "ILM" use for CGI effects, or that big corps. use to crunch insane amounts of data... those machines are leased, then resold when refurbished. Mucho power for the peso.


While that is true when describing the whole machine (workstation VS server), it's not really true when it comes to the CPU itself. Modern CPUs, by design, are multipurpose. For a given architecture, it doesn't matter if it's a XEON or a i7, they will both be able to handle the same sorts of tasks. Server CPUs have a bit more cache and more extensive testing at the factory, but are basically the same thing as their desktop counterparts. The rapid transit off of storage devices is less a matter of CPU and more a matter of bus speed, drive speed, network speed, etc.

Edit: And now I feel like kind of a dick because you praised my earlier comment.


No worries Doc


The true advantage of Xeons vs. i7 is reliability. You never want to overclock one, but with their data throughput, you are exactly right... no need. My wife crashed the last 5 computers that she has owned, going back a decade. The Xeon must be "Cyrus" proof... just sayin



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:47 AM
link   

originally posted by: madmac5150
I was speaking of motherboard architecture. A server or workstation can both have the same CPU, but, be optimized at the motherboard level for each function. A server computer motherboard, would be over-taxed trying to drive a modern video card... they just aren't built for it. The graphics card in my server computer is an old 16-bit card. It doesn't need high end graphics. It's not built for it... yet is very fast at data transfer/routing. It is an older Pentium4, but, it is perfect for what it was designed for.

A workstation would be a piss-poor server, and vice-versa. Two different animals.


I think it also depends on the task at hand. I've got a little headless i3 setup that uses the cheapest mobo I could find... Yet it performs basic web serving tasks and runs most game servers without issue. But I couldn't do video editing on it, because it would eat up the little 64gb SSD like a Jolly Rancher. Actual servers usually come in a rack mountable case, so you can pack as many servers in a small area as humanly possible. When you have a datacenter with 40,000 physical hosts, you can't exactly have a bunch of desktop cases lying around. I think if you took a modern XEON based server and stuck a decent videocard in there, it would game just fine. You would just be spending more money than you need to and it would look ugly on your desk.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: DrWily
a reply to: bananashooter

I would make a few small changes...

It might be worth it to go with a Geforce GTX 1060 or even a 970. The 50's are good for basic gaming, but start to struggle when you really crank up the resolution / graphics settings. The upper end cards might seem a bit pricey, but it's worth it. I had a GTX 480 that lasted over 5 years before it started to show it's age.

It might be tempting to get the big 1tb HD... But WD Blue is on the low end in terms of speed for hard drives, which are already obsolete in terms of speed. 256gb or 512gb SSD are very affordable now and the difference in speed is dramatic.

Other than that your selections seem pretty solid, should make a proper gaming PC.


I'd disagree about the video card.

What commercially available game would "struggle" at high resolution on a 1050? The guy is keeping costs to $1k.

Or, think of it this way, how large and expensive would a screen need to be to properly display the highest resolutions possible with a 1050? (7680 x 4320 pixels is way above the display resolution of even a high quality 4k monitor. An 8k monitor would likely set him back $4,000.00+. If he's got that much money to blow on a monitor, why wouldn't he go for a couple of 1080 Ti's in SLI?).

Things seem to be a reasonable balance, and better than published recommended specs required for most games.



edit on 25/3/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 12:56 AM
link   
A $1000 gaming PC and a GTX 1050 ti?

You messed up somewhere bud. That rig needs to at least have a GTX 1060 as a graphics card

Edit:
My cousins $1000 rig from 2015 has a 970 on it and blows your rig away. I seriously suggest getting a 1060 if you want to enjoy any modern day game at good framerate and 1080p resolution.
edit on 25-3-2017 by Kuroodo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:01 AM
link   

originally posted by: chr0naut

I'd disagree about the video card.

What commercially available game would "struggle" at high resolution on a 1050? The guy is keeping costs to $1k.

Or, think of it this way, how large and expensive would a screen need to be to properly display the highest resolutions possible with a 1050? (7680 x 4320 pixels is way above the display resolution of even a high quality 4k monitor. An 8k monitor would likely set him back $4,000.00+. If he's got that much money to blow on a monitor, why wouldn't he go for a couple of 1080 Ti's in SLI?).

Things seem to be a reasonable balance, and better than published recommended specs required for most games.



Okay, I'll play. Fallout 4 for one. Pump that up to 1440p and crank up the settings? It will bring that 1050 to it's knees. And that's not even close to 4k. Gaming isn't always about resolution, it's mostly about frame rate. I feel like I'm about to have a seizure if the frame rate drops below 30. Heck, I've got a 7 year old card in my closet that could display things at 4k... But could I game on it with that resolution? Nope.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:07 AM
link   

originally posted by: DrWily

originally posted by: madmac5150
I was speaking of motherboard architecture. A server or workstation can both have the same CPU, but, be optimized at the motherboard level for each function. A server computer motherboard, would be over-taxed trying to drive a modern video card... they just aren't built for it. The graphics card in my server computer is an old 16-bit card. It doesn't need high end graphics. It's not built for it... yet is very fast at data transfer/routing. It is an older Pentium4, but, it is perfect for what it was designed for.

A workstation would be a piss-poor server, and vice-versa. Two different animals.


I think it also depends on the task at hand. I've got a little headless i3 setup that uses the cheapest mobo I could find... Yet it performs basic web serving tasks and runs most game servers without issue. But I couldn't do video editing on it, because it would eat up the little 64gb SSD like a Jolly Rancher. Actual servers usually come in a rack mountable case, so you can pack as many servers in a small area as humanly possible. When you have a datacenter with 40,000 physical hosts, you can't exactly have a bunch of desktop cases lying around. I think if you took a modern XEON based server and stuck a decent videocard in there, it would game just fine. You would just be spending more money than you need to and it would look ugly on your desk.


Yeah... my P4 server is a 1U mount, and when combined with my managed switch... the cooling fans sound like a shuttle launch.

I have worked on a lot of toasters, going back decades... servers and workstations have always been a different breed of machines.

But, I must admit, I am not well schooled on the latest generation of motherboards...
edit on 25-3-2017 by madmac5150 because: Cant sleep, the clowns will eat me



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:14 AM
link   
a reply to: chr0naut

Exactly, I haven't even bought a screen yet but am looking cheap, so yeah, I am not going 4k yet and when I do, 1060s will be a lot cheaper.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: madmac5150

Yeah... my P4 server is a 1U mount, and when combined with my managed switch... the cooling fans sound like a shuttle launch.

I have worked on a lot of toasters, going back decades... servers and workstations have always been a different breed of machines.

But, I must admit, I am not schooled well on the latest generation of motherboards...


Ha! I love this forum. When you say toaster, it makes me think of the old AMD Mobile Athlon XP overclocking days. The only machines I've used that you could truly call workstations were Sun workstations running Solaris. Which, those were pretty badass 15 years ago. I'm too much of a builder to actually buy a workstation, I love doing the research and building it myself.

LOL at your shuttle comment. Yeah, 1U isn't a lot of space. They have to put small but high RPM fans in those badboys. Usually no one cares because it's supposed to go into a dedicated room with other servers. Ever heard the sound of thousands of 1U servers? It's like a Saturn V taking off.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:27 AM
link   

originally posted by: DrWily

originally posted by: madmac5150

Yeah... my P4 server is a 1U mount, and when combined with my managed switch... the cooling fans sound like a shuttle launch.

I have worked on a lot of toasters, going back decades... servers and workstations have always been a different breed of machines.

But, I must admit, I am not schooled well on the latest generation of motherboards...


Ha! I love this forum. When you say toaster, it makes me think of the old AMD Mobile Athlon XP overclocking days. The only machines I've used that you could truly call workstations were Sun workstations running Solaris. Which, those were pretty badass 15 years ago. I'm too much of a builder to actually buy a workstation, I love doing the research and building it myself.

LOL at your shuttle comment. Yeah, 1U isn't a lot of space. They have to put small but high RPM fans in those badboys. Usually no one cares because it's supposed to go into a dedicated room with other servers. Ever heard the sound of thousands of 1U servers? It's like a Saturn V taking off.


I was in the USAF. When I was in Korea, I used to have to go into the "comm vault" to reset our servers. Never went in there without ear protection...



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: bananashooter
a reply to: chr0naut

Exactly, I haven't even bought a screen yet but am looking cheap, so yeah, I am not going 4k yet and when I do, 1060s will be a lot cheaper.



Good cheap 1080p monitors are about $80 - $120.

I still suggest getting a 1060 (specifically the 2gb models). The 1060 is the perfect 1080p gaming card. Get a 1080 if you wanna go 4k



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 01:33 AM
link   

originally posted by: bananashooter
a reply to: chr0naut

Exactly, I haven't even bought a screen yet but am looking cheap, so yeah, I am not going 4k yet and when I do, 1060s will be a lot cheaper.

Even the 1060 isn't great for 4k gaming. I'm probably going to get flamed for saying this... But the market isn't ready for 4k gaming right now. I have a 970 (just as fast as the 1060 basically) and it struggles a bit with 2k sometimes. 2k (1440p) is actually insanely sharp for gaming right now. Most games only have textures for 1080p resolution, in which case kicking up the resolution only gives you a little bit of added sharpness when it comes to the edges of polygons. In those situations you will not notice a texture detail difference going above 1080p.



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 02:10 AM
link   


MSI Pro Series Intel Z270 DDR4 HDMI USB 3 SLI ATX

Intel chipset. I hope they have improved over the last 10 years



posted on Mar, 25 2017 @ 03:02 AM
link   
This has probably been mentioned a million times already, but get a solid state drive for your OS drive. It's like going from a scooter to a Hyabusa. You'll never use HDDs again for anything other than storage.




top topics



 
5
<< 1  2  3    5 >>

log in

join