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Mars rover discovered gravitational wave affecting Mars' clouds.

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posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 07:32 PM
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www.sciencemag.org...

I never even knew Mars has clouds so I figured I'd share this. They must be invisible such as CO2 cause everytime I've ever seen a pic of the red planet it looks barren. Methane is invisible too right? I've read that Mars has methane for a debatable reason.

Also, the site shows an animated GIF of the clouds, that might make visiting the site more later likely for uninterested folk.
edit on 22/3/2017 by Gyo01 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

Sry, I was barely through the article before I posted. Lol. Apparently it is CO2 and also water vapor which requires computer enhancement to see. There are multiple GIFs on the site from the rover.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

The title first had me: What!? No way! But then I realised they don't really mean gravity waves as in graviton waves and then

Puh nothing.
Big article about nothing because these honks can't sell their finds without stooping to The Sun levels...



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Gyo01

The title first had me: What!? No way! But then I realised they don't really mean gravity waves as in graviton waves and then

Puh nothing.
Big article about nothing because these honks can't sell their finds without stooping to The Sun levels...

Gotcha. I just didn't know it had that much elements in it's sky. I always thought it didn't have an atmosphere like the moon? I'm not the sharpest pencil in the drawer. So, this was news to me. The GIFs are cool though, enjoy!
edit on 22/3/2017 by Gyo01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

Mars has an atmosphere too thin for liquids, but I am no expert either.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Gyo01

Mars has an atmosphere too thin for liquids, but I am no expert either.


The planet doesn't have a strong magnetic field, so the atmosphere gets stripped away by the solar wind. If we could generate an artificial magnetic field, that would enable a new atmosphere to build up.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

So nuke Mars to create an greenhouse effect won't work as some suggest?

I always thought that idea is way F crazy

edit on 22-3-2017 by Charly182 because: Typo



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:20 PM
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originally posted by: Charly182
a reply to: stormcell

So nuke Mars to create an greenhouse effect won't work as some suggest?

I always see that idea way to F crazy

Heh. Yet, if we do ever figure out how to colonize it, I'd hate to see it fall into many nation states. I hate to say it, but it would be quite probable it would happen unless someone really really smart can invent a system where that can't happen.
edit on 22/3/2017 by Gyo01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

I would hate see the same errors there again that's teue..
Truw thing is that I want so bad to see humans arrive there before dying but I also can't stand the idea of destroying another planet or just use it for company purposes



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Charly182

That was soooo stupid to begin with I can't believe it was actually quoted and attributed to...

The real idea is to put up a 2T coil at the Legrange point and let Mars create an atmosphere in a hundred years.

@stormcell, it has a magnetic field but it is not coherent anymore (it appears scattered, for lack of a better term)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Charly182

Oh, it could work.

You could create an atmosphere on Mars without a magnetic field, however the atmosphere will be stripped away once again in time, but that could take many thousands of years.

Without a Magnetic field you have no protection from outer radiation, even with an atmosphere, you would need shielding, or a nice bubble dome.
edit on 22-3-2017 by MuonToGluon because: Added Content



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:31 PM
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originally posted by: MuonToGluon
a reply to: Charly182

Oh, it could work.

You could create an atmosphere on Mars without a magnetic field, however the atmosphere will be stripped away once again in time, but that could take many thousands of years.

Without a Magnetic field you have no protection from outer radiation, even with an atmosphere, you would need shielding, or a nice bubble dome.

Whatever gets me of this planet. Heh. Maybe people could have fun again.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

I am in complete agreement with you, even if the radiation causes my skin to melt off, but we get seperate bubbles..
edit on 22-3-2017 by MuonToGluon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: MuonToGluon

I wonder what the cave complexes look like on mars. If there were any kind of semi intelligent life, they would have went underground as their atmosphere was slowly stripped away. Oh well. Nice to imagine.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 04:29 AM
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Clouds in the martian sky are visible, but not as clearly as here on Earth. mars.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 05:40 AM
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Important clarification from the comments section of the article:

"'Gravity wave' is a term used in fluid dynamics, which is very different from the same term used in general relativity. Something the author should consider mentioning."



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

To be fair, gravity waves are a feature of weather systems. We know that Venus has them, we know our atmosphere has them, so it stands to reason that other atmospheres will have them too, since gases in systems like atmospheres tend to behave in familiar fashion.

Using the term gravity wave is legitimate as can be, when talking about atmospheric phenomenon. It is also not the fault of the scientists that the journalists who produce the actual media content, are sensationalist in their output. So to be clear, the "honks" are not the ones "selling" their findings. The media group which published the article are.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Point taken



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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Gravity Wave Gravitational Wave

EDIT TO ADD:

The author of the original article linked in the OP must have been made aware of his mistake and has since updated the article (and title) to make the clarification.

In addition to making the correction between "gravity wave" and "gravitational wave" in the article, he's added this to the end of the article

*Update, 23 March, 10:13 a.m.: This story has been updated to clarify the difference between gravity waves and gravitational waves.


edit on 23/3/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: 3daysgone

It is nice to imagine.

As I like to say, just about anything is possible, until we actually set foot on the surface or shoot over advanced robotics, we wont know until then.

Imagine complex life that developed, went under ground and built a cave system of filtration and geothermal power, one by one the power levels are dropping as the hot spots of magma start cooling as the core slows, the population leveling down more and more until only the final 2 decide to set foot outside there underground home to see the sun once more unprotected... thousands of years pass with the methane in the atmosphere we detect now is from a broken seam in their cave shielding releasing the dying greenhouse plants and bacteria within.

*Sigh*



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