It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Duck liver mousse

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:04 PM
link   
Duck liver mousse

This recipe makes approximately 18 four oz jars. Or one large 72 oz big gulp.

Ingredients:

Duck livers 34.5 Oz cleaned 1" pieces
Pork fatback 40.5 Oz 1" pieces
Chicken stock 1 pint
Heavy cream 1 pint
Shallots 22.5 g sliced
Parsley leaves 15 g
Egg Yolks 8
Madeira wine .5 cup
Pink salt 5.2 g
Salt 31.4 g
Dextrose 9 g
Black pepper 13.4 g
Five spice 1 g
Duck Fat 1 pint if you are not heavy handed.

Procedure:

1. Cook pork fatback in boiling water for five minutes. Drain and let cool to room temp.

2. In a sauce pot simmer stock, cream, madeira, shallots and parsley.

Depending on your blender this next step is best done in parts (I do three). That means you want to third all your ingredients and then blend. It doesn't need to be perfect.

3. Combine all ingredients and blend in vitaprep until very smooth.

4. Pour into four oz glass containers.

5. Place jars in a Hotel/roasting/deep pan lined with a towel. Bake in a water bath for anywhere from 10 to 25 min at 250 degrees F.

6. Cook until you reach desired internal temp of 140 degrees F.

7. Remove jars from water bath and cook until solid.

8. Once cooked add a thin layer of duck fat.

9. Once the fat has set, light sprinkle of maldon sea salt.

10. Seal and enjoy.

11. Sell to your friend for 14 bucks a pop.

This is before the duck fat is added.



This is after the duck fat is added but not cold.


edit on 22-3-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:20 PM
link   
I do love a liver pate. I make mine with chicken livers which are less fatty than duck or goose. And much less expensive.
I roast the livers in a 350F oven dressed in olive oil and salt and pepper. About twenty minutes.
Then I blend with cream and brandy and red wine. Amounts depend on how many livers you have. I aim for a peanut butter consistency. Fresh sage marjoram and English thyme are the herbs I use. I grow my own and they are available year round here in Virginia.
The herbs are added when I roast the livers.
It's a quicker method and yields good results.
Yours sounds delicious but more complicated than I want to tackle. But I may anyway just because it does sound good.
Duck fat and duck livers are not available in all grocery stores here.
I'm assuming from your weights and measures that you're in Europe or you're a professional chef in which case stay handy. I'm a home cook with a desire to star in my kitchen and ill want to pick your brain.
edit on 3222017 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:20 PM
link   
Duck liver mousse..? no offence but it sounds disgusting..



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:23 PM
link   
Oh and honey your photos are all upside down.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:25 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Sounds gross but I would give it a try just because I'm curious.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:26 PM
link   
Well just saw your location. I had forgotten about the Chinese restaurant. Ok NYC.
I'm a transplanted New Yorker. I grew up on the Island.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Sillyolme

Yeah, I'm a cook in NYC. You can always order duck livers online and I bet you could find duck fat somewhere. Where did you first get your recipe?


a reply to: Misterlondon


disgusting


You can't have any pudding if you don't eat your meat misterlondon!!!!!!



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
Oh and honey your photos are all upside down.


Fixed?



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 02:45 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Looks good. I would eat the hell out of that.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 04:22 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

For my birthday this year I'm going to buy a 10-20lb suckling pig from dartagnan and throw that little monster in the over! Very excited.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 04:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
For my birthday this year I'm going to buy a 10-20lb suckling pig from dartagnan and throw that little monster in the over! Very excited.


I live two towns over from them so I get to shop at the warehouse. That place is awesome.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 04:53 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I have a recipe somewhere for wild boar pâté with pistachio and dried cranberry. We would use the dartagnan boar. It's feral caught from Texas. It's real nice. Great color, great texture and great taste.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:01 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

That's all I use for my Bolognese sauce.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:05 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

No veal or beef?



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
No veal or beef?


1/3 veal, no beef. Plus I add pancetta.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:45 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I'm not at my house but I have two go to bolognese recipes. One is the pretty standard classic Hazan Bolobnese. The other is a bit different. No milk, pancetta, Prosciutto and I would have to get the recipe to tell you the rest. I was given this by some amazing French chefs at culinary school some years back.

Both very different. Both amazing.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:55 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

I use Big Red's recipe. It seems to be everyone's favorite from the few I cycled through.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 06:02 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Marcella Hazan is the author of Essentials of classic Italian cooking.

This is her bolognese recipe. I would double or triple the amounts. It's an amazing bolognese.

Hazan bolognese



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 06:12 PM
link   
Duck liver is one food I do avoid. I know some people like it because it is fatty and oily. To increase yields of its production the animals are force feed to over eat. This results in a larger liver for more profits. I know that not every duck is force feed, but some of the suppliers that do specialise in duck liver have a bad reputation for the mistreatment of their stock.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 06:16 PM
link   
a reply to: kwakakev

It's a good thing I didn't post my ortolan recipe then.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join