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Dear Liberal Arts Grads: Your Skills Are Essential - Silicon Valley Needs To Get Schooled

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posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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I received a LinkedIn Notification on a newly posted article. It is hilarious! The Politically Correct crowd that has sold an almost useless bill of goods to our youth are trying their damnedest to con the tech sector into hiring non-qualified degree holders into STEM positions.

I put this in the mud-pit as it is a fine example of leftest ideology and humor! (Move to the Rant if more appropriate). The comments on this article are comedy gold. (The term "well rounded" appears to be the only positive thing the commenters repeat over and over as any kind of plus).

www.linkedin.com...




In a 2014 blog post the prominent venture capitalist Marc Andreessen declared “for people who aren’t deep into math and science and technology, it is going to get far harder to understand the world going forward.”

Literatures—like in-depth journalism, plays, music, art, and even activities like cooking—can put you in the shoes of people unlike you in profound, empathetic way. But the importance of these activities is under attack from the big data-mindset that has invaded both Silicon Valley and many of the world’s biggest corporations.

The ability to truly understand someone other than you is not something that can be broken down into 1s and 0s. We shouldn’t ask people to forgo books and great art in order to code. In an increasingly technologically-driven society, we should do the opposite: cherish it, respect the human abilities it fosters, and applaud our kids for wanting to spend time with great stories. You don’t need to do it because it’s nice, but because it’s smart business.

To those of you with a liberal arts degree, I say this: your skills are essential in today’s world, and more companies need to recognize that. To those of you with a STEM degree (or who never bothered with college in the first place), I would say: pick up a book or two every month. Go to plays. Travel and immerse yourself in a culture unlike your own.

Without a deep, empathetic understanding of other people, turning that good idea into the next big thing may prove elusive.




Choice Comments:

So in a nutshell, it's not the students fault that their Lib Arts degrees aren't landing them jobs, it's the employers lack of understanding the value of those degrees that's the problem?
I don't think so.

Great! Just what we need more garbage articles such as this to encourage people to go into useless programs such as Liberal Arts. Listen students, if you want a good and successful career you are better of studying STEM programs or taking in skilled trade such as pipefitting, electrician, welder, etc.


Thankfully, one can read the classics for the cost of a computer with internet, without having to plop down the cost of a house to someone who wants to vilify capitalism. The classics are great! You can keep the degree.

Engineers read books too. Liberal arts majors are adaptable. Literature is not the sole source of empathy. Zuckerberg learned Chinese. This article is nonsense.

omg this article is hilarious save your money kids go in to engineering , product development, accounting , any thing but a liberal arts degree

Data scientists can also read Shakespeare. Problem solved, no need for Art graduates

Considering this article was written by a founder of a consulting company which keeps an inventory of consultants with such degrees, it really seems more like a sales brochure for their product.

Nice try in fabricating your own usefulness but if the lights went out the world would look to engineers to get the juice flowing again while they look at you to satisfy their more 'primal instincts'. LA is akin to moving to Hollywood and trying to become a multimillion dollar star. The odds are ever stacked not in your favor.

The next time you interview for position that requires a MSEE bring this article along to help educate the interviewer as to his blindness to the benefits of your STEM-free education. (BS Biochemistry/Business, Juris Doctor)

I've worked with plenty of people who have Liberal Arts degrees. The ones who don't serve me coffee had some other marketable skill to add to the equation. They learned technology, mechanics or some other technical subject and became tech writers or instructors.




posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.


To the employers, the A would stand for "and".

Welcome to the 21st Century... Revenge Of The Nerds.
edit on 20-3-2017 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.


My son is highly ranked in STEAM related expertise.

He is on the computer night and day communicating with other STEAM experts where, apparently, his team skills are highly valued.




posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

I don't disagree. My skills are only in demand so long as a good understanding of the technical aspects of the language are still a necessary skill to employers.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: ketsuko
Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.


My son is highly ranked in STEAM related expertise.

He is on the computer night and day communicating with other STEAM experts where, apparently, his team skills are highly valued.



An engineer or innovator could be said to be highly skilled in STEAM with a side of the Art bit.

We have a 6-year-old who is currently going through a phase where his "toys" are things he invents for himself. They generally consist of bits and pieces he scavenges out of our recycling bin, maybe a toy or two of his, some LEGOs or Tinker Toys, duct tape and/or modeling clay, string, and possible mom or dad to stand in as technicians when he needs a steadier hand to carry out some of his "vision."

He'll make his contraptions and spend entire days tinkering, testing and playing with them instead of just playing with all the toys he has. I would argue there's a good dollop of creativity in that.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:07 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: ketsuko
Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.


My son is highly ranked in STEAM related expertise.

He is on the computer night and day communicating with other STEAM experts where, apparently, his team skills are highly valued.



I wonder how many got that....




posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

One must acknowledge that there is a lot in commerce that requires skills other than the academic or manual.

I'm a bit aspergers and am continually amazed that my eldest son can sell people goods that cost more than ten times what their requirements mandate.

And these people walk away with smiles, happy in their purchase. Go figure?

My son is what is called a 'salesperson'. These people, if they are good at their role, can earn significant incomes for both themselves and their employers. Apparently, businesses are already savvy to this information and choose to employ many people with this 'gifting'.

Although my son is a qualified tradesman and has done STEM courses, he soon discovered his natural persuasiveness and so, he now takes over the sales departments of companies, in a managerial capacity, and usually exponentially boosts their profits from sales. This pleases both him and the company.

Although there are courses in motivation, persuasion and business acumen, these courses are not STEM courses.

edit on 20/3/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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College. It's not just Liberal Arts, but stuff like Communications and really anything that's general, that to really get a good job you'd need to really drill down to some useful skills.

Even IT Degrees don't guarantee anything these days.

I've taken many college courses in several different colleges, but don't have a degree. Nope, not even an AA degree, but I've beaten many people with college degrees when I was out looking for jobs or jumping departments in a company.

The college degree, even Liberal Arts, is just a way for a recruiter to cull, thin out the applicants.

But what's more important is how you do on interviews, your experience and your perceived value to the team.

Recruiters will forgo superstar for someone that fits well into the team.

The first step is to become a very hard worker. work harder than anyone in your position or your department, next is to review interview questions so they don't take you by surprise. There are many books out there. Then get recommendations and make connections with everyone in your department. Don't burn any bridges. Then go on lot's of interviews until it's not a big deal and they don't make you nervous. Do that and you'll never be without a good job.

Cheers.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:21 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: ketsuko
Didn't you get the memo? It's no longer STEM. They are calling it STEAM now. The "A" stands for Art.


My son is highly ranked in STEAM related expertise.

He is on the computer night and day communicating with other STEAM experts where, apparently, his team skills are highly valued.



An engineer or innovator could be said to be highly skilled in STEAM with a side of the Art bit.

We have a 6-year-old who is currently going through a phase where his "toys" are things he invents for himself. They generally consist of bits and pieces he scavenges out of our recycling bin, maybe a toy or two of his, some LEGOs or Tinker Toys, duct tape and/or modeling clay, string, and possible mom or dad to stand in as technicians when he needs a steadier hand to carry out some of his "vision."

He'll make his contraptions and spend entire days tinkering, testing and playing with them instead of just playing with all the toys he has. I would argue there's a good dollop of creativity in that.


Encourage his creativity! Excellent!

However, I was sarcastically referring to this STEAM.

The
icon at the end was the giveaway.

edit on 20/3/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:26 PM
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I have a MFA but I knew that it was worthless unless I wanted to be an academic. My dad showed me the business ropes long before I ever went to University to party for 6 years. No regrets here. My advice to students starting on the degree path is to get a degree in linguistics. In the near future, English won't be the preferred language for business; it will be Putonghua a form of Mandarin Chinese. Actually you don't need a degree in todays world if you have marketable skills, some discipline, and a fair amount of physical attractiveness and charisma.

www.businessinsider.com...



Brave New World a comin....


edit on 20-3-2017 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Yes, I caught it on second perusal. I'm slow today.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

Looks like to me it's to help those people connect to others better and to be more innovative. I don't know the statistics but I am sure many of those tech people have some kind of autism, which makes it difficult for them to connect. Reminds me of the TV show "Scorpion" where a woman helps the group to connect better.



posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 06:29 PM
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originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: infolurker

Looks like to me it's to help those people connect to others better and to be more innovative. I don't know the statistics but I am sure many of those tech people have some kind of autism, which makes it difficult for them to connect. Reminds me of the TV show "Scorpion" where a woman helps the group to connect better.


Yes, but the writers are very "Liberal Arts" because their science (and common sense) sucks.




posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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Cultured Programmer is an oxy moron.



posted on Mar, 21 2017 @ 06:06 AM
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Art and science are closely related, I can see a need for artists in tech positions. Consider video games are now bigger then Hollywood, designers are needed in 3D printing etc etc... I am a welder fabricator, I am astute to many methods of measurement which is math heavy as well as metal chemistry which is both math and science related yet I am also a painter and illustrator and try to blend the two by metal sculpting. I can see both sides here.



posted on Mar, 21 2017 @ 07:56 AM
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The issue is deeper than that. We have grads with degrees in STEM areas and they still wind up with jobs as waiters, it's not just the liberal art guys.

Just wait till the Silicon Valley bubble bursts, and software engineers and others flood the market. The problem now is that the "no qualified americans" is just a place holder for A) the tech center of the world is not America, it lies East B) Outsourcing of positions as other countries tech sector catch up (India) C) The abuse of the H-1B Visa program where it's cheaper for corporations to bring others in. D) there are a lot of people competing for the same job.

Lastly, a degree is just a foot in the door in apply for any job, you don't necessarily have to stick to your field.



posted on Mar, 21 2017 @ 10:02 AM
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Einstein On Creative Thinking: Music and the Intuitive Art of Scientific Imagination

Wow! Anyone looking for connections between music, mathematics, and physics? How about intuition and reason? Einstein shows us how it all connects. But what do our students typically get, especially in high school and college? They get math without music. They get science without images, feelings and intuition. They get knowledge without imagination. Not only does intuition go undeveloped, many math and science teachers do not give credit to answers (even though they may be correct) that are not explicated by detailed logic. What these teachers appear not to understand is that translating intuitive insights into words or mathematical symbols is a secondary process that can - and should be -- be taught just as explicitly as translating from one language and another.

No wonder so many of our students don't like math and science: what is there to imagine and feel? Where is the art in their learning?"



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