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The ABC Preon Model. Relationship to the Standard Model.

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posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:53 AM
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This is the sixth thread in the series on the ABC Preon Model. Links to earlier threads will appear in the comment below.

As a review before we delve deeper into the model, it is now useful to recap what we've covered so far and see how the ABC Preon Model relates to the Standard Model. Recall that the massive leptons are identifed within the ABC Preon Model as the various states of an anti-A preon bound to a B preon while encompassing a single neutrino, and that the massive antileptons are simply the antimatter counterparts of the massive leptons, as shown below.



The electron is understood to be the ground state of the massive lepton depicted above, the muon the first excited state and the tauon the second excited state. The positron is understood to be the ground state of the massive anti-lepton depicted above, the anti-muon the first excited state and the anti-tauon the second excited state. Along with the neutrino (which we will discuss more fully in the next thread) this shows that all of the leptons employed in the standard model are also available in the ABC Preon Model.

The quarks are identified as a bound state of an A or B preon to a portion of a C preon, while the anti-quarks are identified as a bound state of an anti-A or anti-B preon with a portion of an anti-C preon. Below we see an example baryon and an example meson family, using the delta plus as the example baryon and the pion family as an example meson family.





The up quark is understood to be the ground state of an A preon bound to a portion of a C preon with a neutrino as depicted above, the charm quark is the first excited state of that system and the top quark will get its own thread later in this series. The bottom quark is understood to be the ground state of a B preon bound to a portion of a C preon with a neutrino as depicted above, the strange quark is the first excited state of that system and the bottom quark is the second exited state. The anti-quarks are constructed by replacing each preon with its anti-preon. This shows that all of the quarks (except for the top, as will be discussed later) that are employed in the standard model are also available in the ABC Preon Model.

Since all of the quarks and massive leptons employed in the Standard Model are also available in the ABC Preon Model, all known hadronic and massive leptonic particles consistent with the Standard Model are also consistent with the ABC Preon Model. This is a very important point, since it is well known that the Standard Model is capable of modeling all known particles. Hence (setting aside issues regarding neutrinos and the top quark that will be addressed in future threads) the ABC Preon Model is also capable of modeling all known particles.

The fact that the ABC Preon Model dovetails into the Standard Model is a result of the fact that the ABC Preon Model is a preon model. Preons are assumed to be lower level building blocks for what have heretofore been assumed to be nature's elementary particles. Since the Standard Model so successfully predicts the vast array of experimental data, any preon model will need to be consistent with the Standard Model within certain limits, and we now see clearly how the ABC Preon Model achieves that needed consistency.

Yet in order for any scientific theory to really make a difference, it must have a difference. It is not sufficient to just proclaim a new model that in the end does everything the same as the one we aim to replace. And while a simpler set of elementary particles is appealing, it isn't really enough to separate the ABC Preon Model from the Standard Model. What is needed are different predictions that can be tested. And those different predictions will come into play when one considers high energy physics phenomena beyond what quarks and leptons allow. Those important issues will indeed be looked at in future threads.

Since all of the quarks and heavy leptons employed in the Standard Model are also available in the ABC Preon Model, all known hadronic and heavy leptonic particles consistent with the Standard Model are also consistent with the ABC Preon Model. This is a very important point, since it is well known that the Standard Model is capable of modeling all known particles. Hence (setting aside issues regarding neutrinos and the top quark that will be addressed in future threads) the ABC Preon Model is also capable of modeling all known particles.

The fact that the ABC Preon Model dovetails into the Standard Model is a result of the fact that the ABC Preon Model is a preon model. Preons are assumed to be lower level building blocks for what have heretofore been assumed to be nature's elementary particles. Since the Standard Model so successfully predicts the vast array of experimental data, any preon model will need to be consistent with the Standard Model within certain limits, and we now see clearly how the ABC Preon Model achieves that needed consistency.

Yet in order for any scientific theory to really make a difference, it must have a difference. It is not sufficient to just proclaim a new model that in the end does everything the same as the one we aim to replace. And while a simpler set of elementary particles is appealing, it isn't really enough to separate the ABC Preon Model from the Standard Model. What is needed are different predictions that can be tested. And those different predictions will come into play when one considers high energy physics phenomena beyond what the quarks and leptons allow. Those important issues will indeed be looked at in future threads.



edit on 20-3-2017 by delbertlarson because: minor grammar changes




posted on Mar, 20 2017 @ 05:54 AM
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