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a strange question about tires and air

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posted on Mar, 21 2017 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

I could’t care less whether you believe me or not. I am correcting your information for the benefit of others.




posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: StallionDuck

I could’t care less whether you believe me or not. I am correcting your information for the benefit of others.


what an asshat

...and I'm still saying you're wrong. You'll be leading others astray.


People might believe you if you show your work. Just dont be a dick about it.


edit on 22-3-2017 by StallionDuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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On the same subject, has anyone ever seen the use of small ball bearings in a tire, about an ounce or two, to replace lead weights to balance the tire as it gets up to roadway speed? I have seen small, 3/16" to 1/4" ball bearings fall out of a tire when it was changed but couldn't get any information on it from the owner.

Also, Nitrogen has been the go to gas in recent years to put in a well sealed tire. Unlike air molecules which eventually escape (that's why you must check your air pressures routinely, as well as for slow leaks and punctures) Nitrogen molecules are much larger than air molecules and are less likely to escape through the synthetic rubber compounds that make up a tire. Also, supposedly the nitrogen isn't affected by heat or cold as much as air molecules.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: NightFlight

Spot on. I use them in my tires because of the pressure difference. Since my tires are only inflated to 28psi (factory recommended), when it's cold outside (say 40s and even 50s) the pressure drops. In the 40s, the pressure drops low enough to trigger my alarms (25psi). When driving about a mile, the pressure will go up to 30psi.

With Nitrogen, the pressure doesn't change all that much if hardly at all.

Only drawback.... If you have even the smallest amount of O2 in that tire, you'll get moisture and that's not good.

It also seems to keep my tires from dry rotting too quickly. This happens in about 2-3 years if I'm lucky.



posted on Mar, 24 2017 @ 04:18 AM
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a reply to: StallionDuck


I'm still saying you're wrong.

See Ducky go quack.




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