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Prison Guards Who Boiled A Schizophrenic Man to Death Will Not Be Charged

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posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:00 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: CreationBro

I try.

The devil of it is, I know many Corrections Officers in my day to day life, one of them is one of my older sisters.

Those guys and gals would never in a million years even contemplate doing something of this nature. How in the Hell does one institution have four monsters of this calibre?

There is something else going on here, but I've no idea what. Frankly, looking too closely might cause me to projectile vomit.



Blessings. I have a good friend in the job as well. Not an easy occupation.

My guess? Cartel involvment as Ketsuko brought up.




posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: CynConcepts

Pack mentality. Of the guards, 2 are likely micrcephalic morons led by a smarter and more manipulative leader.

The guy was screaming for help. Their whole reason for having him in that position to begin with was bullying. I would bet anything that other prisoners were sick of him due to the behaviors of his mental illness, so were unwilling to defend him. The guards were simply taking care of a problem for them. Otherwise, you don't see guards harming prisoners...they're horribly outnumbers and perilously so. But they felt safe bullying this guy, because he was a pain in everyone ass. At least, that is what I'd suspect, given the details available.

My wife works in a forensic mental hospital, with patients like this guy. THey don't need to be in general population, and represent a risk to everyone involved in the operation. Hospitalization is the only way.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:24 AM
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simple. those four were paid off to do a job, and systematically protected to not face jail time.
whoever was pulling the strings possibly has a bunch of brass on their payroll.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Absolutely. Persons like him with severe symptoms should be hospitalized instead of imprisoned for a variety of reasons, some of which you mentioned. I wonder if he was properly medicated while imprisoned? Doubtful.


edit on 19-3-2017 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:35 AM
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a reply to: CreationBro

Im not convinced people are properly medicated in psychiatric hospitalizations. The elephant in that room is prohibition and an untapped medical miracle for a wide variety of ailments. BUt leaving that aside as a common pet complaint, I believe psychology is not a science. Its a liberal arts program that is "sciency". Thankfully they've stopped blindly stabbing peoples brain with sharp implements to treat behavioral disorders. But all they really did was begin blindly stabbing your brain with pharmochemicals.

Even the diagnostic manual for psychological ailments is flubbed for political convenience. The DSM clearly sttaes that the verbiage around "Gender dysmorphic disorder" is amended to prevent undue psychological stress. I.e, to not make people upset that transgenderism is classified as a disorder by psychologists. Because psychology is mistakenly thought of as a science.

Sorry for the off topic rant.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: CreationBro

In that sort of situation? I doubt it.

The medication will be the cheapest available, and the personnel issuing it won't be of the highest caliber. Not that they're bad people, but other institutions get the brightest and best.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

That or it was as BFFT hypothesizes, an in house hit. Taking out an individual who was less than well liked by staff and prisoners alike.

Little else really makes any sense.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:53 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: CreationBro

In that sort of situation? I doubt it.

The medication will be the cheapest available, and the personnel issuing it won't be of the highest caliber. Not that they're bad people, but other institutions get the brightest and best.


Even if he was medicated, periods of decompensation should still be treated on an inpatient basis. Prison is hard. Having to put up with someone who's insane doing insane stuff (i can only imagine...i've seen things) certainly doesn't make life any better.

I doubt it was a hit. It was probably more like he was filthy, smelled terrible, and was getting complaints from his peers. So the guards had to give him a shower (sigh). I doubt they intended to kill him. I would imagine they expected the water to max out around 130, as that is kind of the generally agreed upon range to prevent scalds by insurance companies. I would suspect that they were indifferent to his screams, thinking he's still crazy and just screaming. Since everyone is sick of him, they are able to get away with bullying him. Tey are "teaching him a lesson" on behalf of the whole cell block.

This is just me trying to take what the story says, use what I know about people, and paint a possible image. But I believe that the equipment was faulty. The water should never get to 180 degrees. I believe the prison guards were mistreating a prisoner because he was insane and needed someone to make sure they did basic stuff like bathe, meaning they had to do a task they didn't want to do. In the process of their bullying to "teach him a lesson", the malfunction cooked him alive. They simply thought his screams were more schizophrenic symptomology. They aren't trained to provide that kind of care, so did a terrible job at it. On top of bully and mistreating a prisoner for making them have to do work.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

You #ing nailed it. I literally cannot agree more.


edit on 19-3-2017 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

The video posted on page 2, they say he had defecated in his cell and repeatedly refused the guards demands that he clean it up. They say that the shower was about the size of a phone booth, the controls inside for temperature were broken and could only be controlled by the main switch by the guards. The other inmates could not help him as he was locked in, and requested for help over the course of at lest one hour while the man agonized and screamed in pain.

Its strange that the shower is lockable. They are the same size in one of our local county jails, but its covered with a simple curtain. The other one uses an open style with 9 showers for their dorms.

Well thats Miami for you. They just don't have that Tampa discipline. The worst that happens in the local jail is someone dumps an inmate out a wheelchair. thats pretty #ty too though.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Haven't gotten that far....been distracted trying to figure out neolithic asian migration routes.

I have a problem focusing sometimes. LOL



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 02:01 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
Yea I was just updating accordingly is all. But seriously, when do prisons and jails have lockable showers??? I was in juvee as kid once, and those showers were not lockable either. Just a handful of showers with walls separating them. I find that unorthodox from experience and from testimony from two friends I spoke with after just hearing this story. They had both spent multiple years in a state prison, but never saw a shower stall on its own that could be sealed in.

Could this be a discrepancy?? We not getting the whole story??



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

What governmental water system is said to be operational functional when it is capable of providing 180 degree water?

Im not an authority....but i do know that the range for hot water in public space is 110-120 degrees.

inspectapedia.com...

I cannot imagine that the building code, state law, general liability insurance and a whole other list of regulatory and interested parties would approve of the water system being able to provide water to a shower at that temperature.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I think you nailed it.

I've been watching the Kirov Ballet on you-tube, and pondering this story, as it hits fairly close to home, as you know...and that's about where my thinking was taking me. Don't ask me why I chose Swan Lake by the Kirov Ballet...I couldn't tell you.

Micro-cephalic morons and maladjusted hot water heaters, steam I would imagine, all combining for a horrible, horrible outcome. I don't know what's worse. This? A hit?



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 03:04 AM
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This is NOT the right way to gain "Florida Man" status.

Ideally, you want to gain Florida Man status by doing something zany and weird like drive an ice cream truck into bank.

"Florida Man Drives Frozen Treats Into Bank" ... not brutally boiling a human being to death with scalding hot water.

Not OK.

ETA: There's a reason the DOJ is investigating various correctional centers across the USA for gross negligence and horrible conditions in our jails. Reading some of the DOJ reports on certain jails would make most people physically ill.
edit on 19-3-2017 by Kettu because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 03:38 AM
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I some despair of what ATS has become however I am glad to see that in my quick skim of the 3+ pages of post that no one has justified this barbaric act.

The truth is I first checked to see where this murder was committed. Was it an Arab country/IS held territory? Sadly no. It was Miami, a place I am quite familiar with having been about 20 times. I then wondered about the victim's race....

In Britain there are very stringent health and safety rules. Having worked in Several multinational companies their kitchen facilities have stickers over the taps showing that the water may be dangerously hot. Apart from the inevitable "keep up after you" signs many now have instructions for the safe use of the Microwave. One such Company is US owned. So why was anyone put into a potentially unsafe shower in US soil?

I firmly believe that you can tell a lot about society by how you treat the most vulnerable!



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 05:04 AM
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a reply to: infolurker

I look forward to what President Trump - the peoples president - will action on the back of this story. It will be a lesson to us all.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 05:15 AM
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One of the many tragedies of this case is that the individual was jailed for a crime (coc aine possession) that is regularly committed by politicians and the mega-rich.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I think your scenario is the most likely to have happened with it explaining a lot of factors and falling short of 'evil.' Even the most sadistic of guards value their jobs enough to avoid murdering individuals in front of a crowd of witnesses. The article mentions the scalding treatment was a familiar technique.

In this case, it looks like the guards have been desensitised in their roles and lack the oversight to care. They possibly feel insulated from liability because mentally ill individuals make for very poor witnesses. A two hour shower implies disrespect and disregard for the victim. Nobody on staff to say, "Enough is enough." One member of staff frozen out of a job for complaining about the culture there. No leadership feeling pressured to enforce rules either.

They'll have another incident soon enough and heads will roll unless the staff are brought into line.

I was startled to see the nurse's description of his skin falling off being waved off as 'decomposition.' The complacency in such a lie is more evidence that oversight is practically non-existent. It's like a top to bottom absence of duty of care. They say a fish rots from the head.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

I think there is a general school of thought that "You don't ruin someones life because of scum".

Its what props up the "thin blue line", which tends to be similar to what you describe among the CO's in that facility. You can't fill jobs when you are known to imprison ex employees. And when everyone's dirty, the only way to start cleaning is to clean it all.



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