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How can we stop a Tornado?

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posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: IngyBall

Thank you for the reply,are you aware of any experiments that have been done to test what I proposed?or something simmilar in nature?




posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: OlegK

Nope, although I haven't really looked into things of that nature. I'm still learning how things work so when I research something it's usually along those lines.



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:46 PM
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Under certain conditions, liquid like water and the gases in air can act in similar ways. Wind swirling in a tornado and water swirling down a drain both create a shape called a vortex. The funnel in a tornado is an effect, not a cause. The cause is a significant difference in air pressure. If you could interrupt a funnel, it would just recreate itself again because of the difference in air pressure.
edit on 22-3-2017 by charlyv because: s



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 05:56 PM
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As i understand it, tornadoes happen because of a temperature differential between the two weather fronts. The hot, or updraft side, rises rapidly when met with the colder downdraft side. The rapid upward motion will almost always tend to exhibit vortex motion. Strong enough updraft and rotation equals tornado.

The best way to stop one would be to eliminate the temperature differential by rapidly cooling the updraft side. You could also heat the downdraft side but hot air will rise and you could just be making the tornado stronger. The question is how do you rapidly cool a specific area large enough to make a difference and how do you know where it make the biggest difference?



posted on Mar, 22 2017 @ 06:58 PM
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That's so funny, the first thing I thought of when I read the title was detonate a missle inside of the tornado to disrupt the wind pattern that should dissipate the tornado, then when I started reading the thread those were the first ideas discussed.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: DonVoigt

Your a genius



posted on Mar, 27 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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It seem that no understands the magnitude of a storm systems. An explosion required to disrupt a tornado generating storm would need to be strong enough to blow up hundreds of square miles of atmosphere. Next question is what would it do to the ground? Do the math! A thunderstorm is roughly 20 miles by 20 miles by 15 miles high. Without taking my shoes off, that is approx. 6000 square miles of atmosphere.




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