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Blue Light Therapy Kills MRSA -- and so much more!!!

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posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 10:39 AM
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For some reason I got the bright idea -- pun intended hahaha! -- to search for clinical studies using light therapy to treat MRSA, really not expecting much. But boy oh boy was I very pleasantly surprised to find that blue light therapy in particular does indeed kill MRSA specifically, and bacterial infections in general. Both in vitro ("in glass," as in petri dishes and test tubes) and in vivo ("in the living," in this case, the bodies of mice). This is pretty exciting stuff. Especially for MRSA patients, who suffer so much and have so few treatment options. From Science Daily (2009):

Blue Light Destroys Antibiotic-resistant Staph Infection

Two common strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, were virtually eradicated in the laboratory by exposing them to a wavelength of blue light, in a process called photo-irradiation.

The "two common strains" are known as CA-MRSA (aka US-300) and HA-MRSA (aka IS-853). The "CA" stands for "community acquired," and causes very painful abscesses on the skin, and is often dangerous, leading to amputation, even death. The "HA" stands for "hospital acquired," infecting the blood stream and lymphatic system, and causes internal infections ranging from sinus infections to pneumonia to sepsis and everything in between. If it gets in the bone marrow, it can cause bone infections (ostemyelitis). If it gets to the heart, it can cause a heart attack (endocarditis).

The authors report that the higher the dose of 470-nm blue light, the more bacteria were killed. High-dose photo-irradiation was able to destroy 90.4% of the US-300 colonies and the IS-853 colonies. The effectiveness of blue light in vitro suggests that it should also be effective in human cases of MRSA infection, and particularly in cutaneous and subcutaneous infections.

The "470-nm" refers to the placement in the UV spectrum, which measures in nanometers ("nm") what we commonly know as colors. Going higher on the spectrum (500+-nm) moves into the green color... going lower on the spectrum (400-) takes us into purple. The higher the nanometers, the deeper the light can penetrate and be absorbed. The lower the nanometers, the greater the antibacterial properties.

However, the body has specific responses to light in the 600 – 900 nm wavelength range. This light can pass through the tissues much easier than other wavelengths. Specifically, light at about 660 nm has been shown to provide optimal biological responses. This energy is absorbed by the body up to a depth of about 10-12 mm and stimulates ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the mode of chemical energy transportation at the cellular level. The cells receive this rejuvenating, anti-aging energy boost that enables them to perform their natural functions at a heightened level.
Source (with graphic of visible spectrum)

For those more familiar with the imperial system rather than the metric system, 10-12mm would be just under 1/2 an inch. Not surprisingly therefore, blue light therapy has proven quite effective for the CA-MRSA strain which causes skin abscesses. It has also received FDA approval for the treatment of acne, including self-treatment at home, with notable success.

Subjects evaluated self administration of the blue light treatment according to the device’s labeling as being safe and effective. The study showed that daily self treatment using the device for mild-to-moderate inflammatory acne reduced the number of acne lesions significantly. Moreover, the study demonstrated a significant improvement of the subjects’ skin conditions. Subjects included in the study were able to safely and effectively administer self treatment with the device and felt confident doing so.
Source

Blue light therapy is also approved for Seasonal Affective Disorder ("SAD"). From the Mayo Clinic

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that typically occurs each year during fall and winter. Use of a light therapy box can offer relief.

Different colors offer different healing qualities. Green, for example, is also known to kill bacteria and other yukky stuff that makes us sick. Red is known for reliving aches and pains, as well as reducing wrinkles.

Technically speaking, as I understand it, light therapy alone is known as Phototherapy, color therapy alone is known as Chromotherapy, and combining these modes -- and/or others -- is known as Photodynamic therapy. For example, this study combined blue light, silver and prescription antibiotics, and found the efficacy of each were enhanced exponentially:

The bactericidal activity of AgNPs, at sub-MIC, and blue light was significantly (p < 0.001) enhanced when both agents were applied in combination compared to each agent alone. Similarly, synergistic interactions were observed when AgNPs were combined with amoxicillin, azithromycin, clarithromycin or linezolid in 30-40 % of the double combinations with no observed antagonistic interaction against the tested isolates.

(Note: AgNPs refers to silver -- "Ag" -- nanoparticles -- "NPs")

Another example would be the combination of topical agents with the light therapy:

At IECSC Las Vegas, Lightwave is demonstrating how topical skin care can be infused into the skin with light emitting diode (LED) technology. The company has developed Topical Light Infusion (TLi),which combines the effectiveness of LED therapy and functional topical formulations into one treatment program. This technology can safely and effectively address a variety of cosmetic concerns on the face and body.

The absolute best part of all is the virtual absence of adverse side effects!!! Well, with one notable exception:

The only valid risk of blue light therapy is over exposure of blue light to the eyes, or eye damage from the high glare of some devices. For these reasons, most products come with eye protection included, and you should always wear it.

LEDs -- "light emitting diodes" -- seem to be the preferred light source:

The optimal NIR technology is done by LED as you are able to control the surface temperature. Also LED disperses over a larger surface area than a RED light halogen or laser. Another major difference between LED and halogen and Laser is the way light energy is delivered (optical power output – OPD). The OPD of LED Near is measured in milliwatts and laser and halogen is measured in watts. This allows LED to have a more gentler delivery as it will not damage tissue and will not have the same risk of accidental eye injury. Also with LED NIR disperses over a greater surface area give a faster treatment time.


(continued in next post...)




posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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(Continued...)

Ooops...

While researching all this, I was reminded that Edgar Cayce's healing recommendations also incorporated colors and light. I was also reminded of the astrologer Linda Goodman's "purple plates" for healing, attributed to the work of Nikola Tesla. So I started looking for others who researched and/or promoted the use of color/light for healing -- and found a very long history of such!

Specific colors were used to restore health among ancient cultures in Egypt, Greece, China and India..... a priest and physician in England, John of Gaddesden, wrote a treatise on the use of red color to treat smallpox...... Skip ahead to nineteenth century Denmark and the work of Dr. Niels Ryberg Finsen. In 1892, he reported the successful use of red light to prevent scar formation from smallpox. He was honored with a Nobel Prize in 1903 for his pioneering work with light therapy. This time he had successfully healed tubercular skin lesions with ultraviolet light...... Edwin D. Babbitt, a contemporary of Finsen, published Principles of Light and Color in 1878...... Kate Baldwin, used color therapy extensively in the 1920s. Dr. Baldwin was the Senior Surgeon of Woman’s Hospital in Philadelphia in the US...... Dr. Baldwin’s words were echoed by Hazel Parcells, a leading naturopathic physician in the US during the latter half of the twentieth century. Dr. Parcells also used color therapy extensively. She remained active and in good health until she passed away peacefully in her sleep in 1996 … at 106 years of age. Her biographer reports: “Dr. Parcells often said that if all the tools for natural self-healing were taken away from her, save one, she would want that one to be color.”
Source

But the most detailed -- and most intriguing account I found was from one Augustus Pleasonton --

During the Civil War, Augustus was appointed to the rank of Brigadier General of the Pennsylvania militia in May 1861. He commanded a 10,000 strong detachment of home guard infantry, cavalry, and artillery for the defense of the city of Philadelphia. His younger brother Alfred served as a General for the Federal Union Army in the American Civil War.


-- and its effects on people, animals, and plants. General Pleasonton used sunlight streaming through blue glass for his efforts, with reportedly great results. But he also related stories of using blue gauze with sunlight for similar results.

Blue Glass and Sunlight Therapy

During the summer of 1871, Mr. Dreer, one of our most successful horticulturists, called my attention to another confirmation of my theory, which had just come to his notice. It was as follows, viz.: A professional gardener in Massachusetts (near Boston) had been trying for several years to protect his young plants, as they were germinating, from various minute insects which fed upon them, sometimes as soon as they were formed. For this purpose he adopted nearly every expedient of which he had any knowledge, and even used the primary rays of sunlight separately. Nothing succeeded, however, in these experiments but the blue ray, which proved itself to be a perfect protection against the attacks of these insects. He made a small triangular frame, similar in form to a soldier's tent, covered it with blue gauze, such as ladies use for their veils. Having prepared a piece of ground, he sowed his seed in it, and, covering a portion of the ground thus prepared with his little blue -frame and gauze, he left the other parts exposed to the attacks of the insects. His plants outside of this frame were all eaten by the insects, as soon as they germinated, while those under it escaped entirely from their depredations. This experiment was tried many times, and always with similar results.

I guess creepy crawly bugs aren't that much different than bacterial bugs! Many more such testimonies at the link.

I am so intrigued that I'm going to have some fun with it in my own garden. I have already seen remarkable results after placing a blue bandana over a mealy cup sage seedling that was withering, only to see it full and healthy looking the very next morning. I have three Texas Sage shrubs that I planted a couple weeks ago along my back fence. All are in the same soil, receive the same amount of sun, and otherwise identical conditions. I have placed a tomato cage around one and covered it with a blue bandana. Another plant I will keep uncovered, but I will water it with water from a blue bucket allowed to sit in the sun. The last one I will simply water and tend to as usual. We'll see what happens!

I've also ordered 40-yard bolts of blue, purple and green tulle to make a canopy to go over my pool this season. I know it's a mighty sacrifice for me to laze around in the pool all summer -- even in the name of medical science! -- but it's a sacrifice I'm willing to make. If anyone else is interested in making such a sacrifice (or similar), I'd love to hear your results.

If you're still with me -- and I thank you for that
-- there's one more reason I find this so exciting beyond the relief it offers for so many suffering people... It returns the power of healing to the individual. It is inexpensive, easily done at home, and can be done by one's self for one's self -- and/or our loved ones. We do not have to rely on anyone else, or hope that our craptastic insurance company covers it or that the it is approved by the crony capitalist FDA or another alphabet agency. And we desperately need to take back the power and control over our own health care. Especially now, when it seems the PTB are determined to absolutely destroy our healthcare system -- as evidenced by the new shade of lipstick on the Obamacare pig.

My daddy was right: If you want something done right, you've gotta do it yourself.

(continued in next post...)
edit on 18-3-2017 by Boadicea because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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Further Reading:
Marshall Medical Center: MRSA Fact Sheet
PubMed Clinical Study: Blue 470-nm Light Kills Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Vitro
PubMed Clinical Study: A combination of silver nanoparticles and visible blue light enhances the antibacterial efficacy of ineffective antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
PubMed Clinical Study: Blue Light Eliminates Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Infected Mouse Skin Abrasions
Science Daily: Blue Light Destroys Antibiotic-resistant Staph Infection
Avazzia (pdf): Blue Light Therapy: Another Tool for Battling MRSA
Proto Mag: Blue Light Special (much technical info here)
The Boil Bible: Blue light therapy is the biggest development in MRSA treatment in years.
PubMed Clinical Study: Clinical Efficacy of Self-applied Blue Light Therapy for Mild-to-Moderate Facial Acne
Mayo Clinic: Light therapy
Joov: Does Red Light Therapy Really Work?
Light Therapy Options: Your Complete Guide to Blue Light Therapy (more graphs here)
My Light Therapy: Color Therapy
Red Light Therapy: A Step-By-Step Guide to Infrared Light Therapy Treatment
Leaf: Green Light Therapy Benefits The Sunlighten Blog (pdf): Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in Dermatology
Wikipedia: Light Therapy
Wikipedia: Chromotherapy
Wikipedia: Photodynamic Therapy
Skin Inc: Combining Topicals and LED for Increased Efficacy
The Sunlighten Blog: The Difference Between Light Therapy and Near Infrared Therapy



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Where do I buy one? Serious question.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Boadicea

Where do I buy one? Serious question.


I ordered a simple blue LED bulb on Amazon (about $20), with a socket and 12 ft electrical cord (about $10):

ABI 12W Blue LED PAR38 Grow Light for Aquarium and Plant Growth (450-460nm)

There are plenty of other options, some designed for greater convenience, but prices go up from there.

I'd love to hear your results if you're inclined to share -- feel free to comment here again, or you can PM me.
edit on 18-3-2017 by Boadicea because: corrected link



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

This will cut into the hospitals profits. Someone getting a serious infection from one of these nasty viruses is big $$$ for the hospital.

I would find it very hard to believe the hospitals don't know this.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 11:15 AM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: Boadicea

This will cut into the hospitals profits. Someone getting a serious infection from one of these nasty viruses is big $$$ for the hospital.

I would find it very hard to believe the hospitals don't know this.


That's the truth!

And, unconscionably, the system is structured in such a way that inexpensive and unpatentable treatments are discouraged, while the most expensive and patentable are promoted and rewarded.

One more reason we all need to take greater responsibility and power for our own healthcare needs.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: Boadicea

This will cut into the hospitals profits. Someone getting a serious infection from one of these nasty viruses is big $$$ for the hospital.

I would find it very hard to believe the hospitals don't know this.


I saw a report a few years ago about hospitals using a portable light system to disinfect rooms in between patients. Thought it was brilliant at the time and expected it to become mainstream.

But I haven't heard much about it since then. Though I don't really get much hospital news. Perhaps some folks here that work in hospitals could respond. If it isn't mainstream by now them I'd bet that something is going on to block it.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: bluesjr



I saw a report a few years ago about hospitals using a portable light system to disinfect rooms in between patients.


Interesting! My head's been spinning with possible applications for the technology -- that would definitely be a brilliant one. I just found this -- 5 latest findings on UV light disinfection in hospitals -- from June, 2015.

1. In just 10 minutes, a pulsed xenon UV robot can kill Clostridium difficile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus on hospital room surfaces, a study in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology found.
2. Utica, N.Y.-based Faxton St. Luke's Healthcare was able to reduce rates of Clostridium difficile infections by 39 percent after implementing a bundle of evidence-based interventions and using the Sufacide Helios Triple Emitter UV-C disinfection system.
3. UV light disinfection can be used on personal protective equipment, while the healthcare worker is still wearing it, to reduce the risk of possible contamination while taking off the PPE, according to a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control.
4. Continuous UV-C disinfection robots were proven to be more effective in killing pathogens than pulsed xenon devices in a study funded by the U.S. Veterans Administration.
5. Germ-zapping robots using pulsed xenon ultraviolet light can clean hospital rooms about as well as manual cleaning, according to research from the Texas A&M Health Science Center in Round Rock. Last year in a different study, the same researcher also found that manual cleaning plus UV light killed 99 percent of MRSA bacteria.

Pretty impressive, eh? Nothing about which or how many hospitals are currently using it though.


Thought it was brilliant at the time and expected it to become mainstream.

But I haven't heard much about it since then. Though I don't really get much hospital news. Perhaps some folks here that work in hospitals could respond.


Yes! Please!!! We've got some pretty smart medical-type ATSers among us whom I very greatly appreciate...


If it isn't mainstream by now them I'd bet that something is going on to block it.


Sadly, simply the way the system is structured could do that all by itself. If there's no money to be made on it, then no one will do the research to prove the benefits to market and sell the product... Hospital administrators and other mucketymucks making the decisions may not even know.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: bluesjr
You don't have to work at a hospital to see the minimum wage cleaning staff go around with the solution in a bucket and a swisher style sweeper.

I have seen the same in both the hospitals and rest homes.

If hospitals were serious about sanitation, they would have well paid and well "armed" staff. Instead they use the same tech from the 1950's.

Maybe a class action law suit from the millions of people who got infections from hospitals "dirty" environment. The pocket book is all Big Medical understands.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: seasonal


Maybe a class action law suit from the millions of people who got infections from hospitals "dirty" environment.


From your keyboard to God's ears... but that has proven difficult. Too often, MRSA is not identified until too late. The testing protocol takes several weeks, and obviously when someone is sick and/or dying, they have to be treated immediately. If one lives, one would have to prove it was actually a MRSA infection caught in that specific hospital within a specific timeframe. One would also have to prove irreparable damage. (Much easier with the CA-MRSA resulting in loss of limb or vision or something similar.) If one doesn't live, quite often the testing is never done, and the cause of death is listed as the result of the MRSA infection -- such as pneumonia or cardiac arrest -- rather than the MRSA itself.

However, I have read of folks addressing these obstacles now that they know, so there is hope for the future.


The pocket book is all Big Medical understands.


Indeed, and they've worked hard to stack the deck against us.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

My apologies, I posted the wrong Amazon link before. This is the one I actually purchased:

ABI 12W Blue LED PAR38 Grow Light for Aquarium and Plant Growth (450-460nm)

It's about the same price, and pretty much the same, but does specify the nanometers, which the other does not. Again, I am so sorry.



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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Thanks for the info.

Marking for later
edit on 18 3 2017 by zardust because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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More interesting information/ideas for color therapy:

Solarized Water


A simple way of applying colour to the body is to use solarized water.

When exposed to sunlight, water in a coloured container absorbs the vibrational energy of that particular colour. This can then be drunk by sipping the water or used for bathing a particular part of the body.


Granted, "vibrational energies" sounds just a little woowoo... however, perhaps we could replace "vibrational" with "healing." I cannot find any clinical studies testing such a theory, but I'd love to see/read one!



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:03 AM
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Good for this. As antibiotics are building up immunities to infections, nice to hear there's a viable alternative when medication is said to be at it's end for helping to cure these.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 12:05 AM
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UV is actually pretty effective as a disinfectant. A bit beyond the blue though.

White LEDs are actually heavy on the blue, but word is, it's bad for your eyes.
edit on 3/19/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 07:35 AM
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originally posted by: dreamingawake
Good for this. As antibiotics are building up immunities to infections, nice to hear there's a viable alternative when medication is said to be at it's end for helping to cure these.


Yes! And one of the beauties about the light therapy is that the MRSA (and other antibiotic resistant conditions) cannot seem to develop a resistance to the light. If I remember correctly, one way that it works is by breaking down the biofilm encasing the bacteria which protect it from even our own bodies' natural defenses. That might explain why the combination of light, silver and antibiotics actually all work better together.



posted on Mar, 19 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
UV is actually pretty effective as a disinfectant. A bit beyond the blue though.


Yes! That was exciting stuff for me to learn!


White LEDs are actually heavy on the blue, but word is, it's bad for your eyes.


Yes again! I read about some therapeutic use for white light as well -- but with that precaution. Apparently even fluorescent lights are high in the blue light also.




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