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Edward Snowden Is A Hero, Not A Traitor

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posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:09 AM
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Time to do my civic duty. Ed Snowden is a hero, not a traitor. To put it as simply as possible, he blew the whistle on enemies of the constitution. Every soldier takes an oath to support and defend the US Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. This means that we have a duty to refuse unlawful orders, and to work against superiors issuing those unlawful orders. It is a serious crime to follow unlawful orders under the Uniform Code Of Military Justice(UCMJ). The UCMJ requires that a soldier refuse to follow unlawful orders. What's a good soldier to do then, when given orders that he knows are unconstitutional? Quite simply, refuse to follow them. Work against the agents issuing those orders, or relieve them, if necessary.

This is the prime reason I can't fault Snowden for his actions. Frankly, it's upsetting to me to see people here and elsewhere on the web and in the news calling for his imprisonment, execution, or assassination. Those of you engaging in this sort of behavior are the real traitors, in my opinion. You'd flush our rights down the toilet for the temporary fleeting illusion of increased security? You ought to be ashamed of yourselves. Calling this man a traitor for doing the right thing is pitiful and disgusting in my opinion. He compromised no human assets during his disclosures, though he was certainly in a position to do so. He hasn't sold the information he departed with, though he was certainly in a position to do so. He has compromised his anonymity in order to give voice to the cause of liberty, which was a major sacrifice on his part.

I think his actions are brave and admirable. I don't know the guy, but if he'd gotten into my cab and told me what he was up against, I would have given him a pep talk. What he has done is the right thing to do. It is what a true patriot should do, in my opinion. This man should not be jailed, he should be given a medal and ten million dollars.

Thanks to Ed Snowden we know (at least partially) just how far we've fallen away from the lofty ideals of liberty for which this country is supposed to stand. We know that the metadata and text messages from our cell phones is being collected and stored, courtesy of our government. We know that everything we do online is tracked and recorded, including our private correspondences, courtesy of our government. We know that our government has intimidated thousands of businesses into handing over that data, and threatened them into silence as they are doing it. Of course his revelations have shown that our intelligence agencies have been spying on governments, their citizens, and leaders around the world, though this last revelation probably comes as no surprise to most of us.
www.pri.org...
mashable.com...

Amongst the most disturbing of Ed's revelations is one mentioned in this der spiegel interview with Snowden:

Interviewer: But if details about this system are now exposed, who will be charged?

Snowden: In front of US courts? I'm not sure if you're serious. An investigation found the specific people who authorized the warrantless wiretapping of millions and millions of communications, which per count would have resulted in the longest sentences in world history, and our highest official simply demanded the investigation be halted. Who "can" be brought up on charges is immaterial when the rule of law is not respected. Laws are meant for you, not for them.

Rule of law circumvented in regards to unconstitutional actions...What's a good soldier to do?

When one enlists in the United States Military, active duty or reserve, they take the following oath:

I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Officers, upon commission, swear to the following:

I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.

Military members who fail to obey the lawful orders of their superiors risk serious consequences. Article 90 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) makes it a crime for a military member to WILLFULLY disobey a superior commissioned officer.

Article 91 makes it a crime to WILLFULLY disobey a superior Noncommissioned or Warrant Officer. Article 92 makes it a crime to disobey any lawful order (the disobedience does not have to be "willful" under this article).

In fact, under Article 90, during times of war, a military member who willfully disobeys a superior commissioned officer can be sentenced to death.

These articles require the obedience of LAWFUL orders. An order which is unlawful not only does not need to be obeyed but obeying such an order can result in criminal prosecution of the one who obeys it. Military courts have long held that military members are accountable for their actions even while following orders -- if the order was illegal.

"I was only following orders," has been unsuccessfully used as a legal defense in hundreds of cases (probably most notably by Nazi leaders at the Nuremberg tribunals following World War II). The defense didn't work for them, nor has it worked in hundreds of cases since.

The first recorded case of a United States Military officer using the "I was only following orders" defense dates back to 1799...

www.thebalance.com...
www.constitution.org...
www.ucmj.us...
www.counterpunch.org...
www.washingtonsblog.com...

Personally I think the most frightening aspect of this situation we have with these runaway mechanisms is the potential for abuse. Anyone can be targeted with these mechanisms, not just 'the bad guys'.

Mr. Snowden has been charged with espionage and theft of government property.

www.law.cornell.edu...

On the other hand, he was given illegal orders, so he had a duty to disobey them:

The program eventually came to include some purely internal controls - but no requirement that warrants be obtained from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court as the 4th Amendment to the Constitution and the foreign intelligence surveillance laws require.

In other words, no independent review or judicial oversight.

That kind of surveillance is illegal. Period.

www.aclu.org...
www.eff.org...
www.pbs.org...

Out of room. More will follow.
edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: edit




posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:09 AM
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I've probably been targeted by these programs, as have many of you. Perhaps I'll be targeted again for posting this thread. Oh well. Somebody needs to say these things here. Since no one else will, I guess it falls to me once again to be that guy. I'm proud of you Mr. Snowden. You did the right thing. You're doing the right thing. I wish there were more I could do for you. Know at least that this patriot recognizes your brave and noble sacrifice, and also remembers the oath he took so many years ago.

And you...you there on the other side of the screen, prying into my personal life, prying into countless people's personal lives, illegally...you can go to hell for what you're doing to this country. I love my country, and I'm upset about what you're doing to it. Allow me to remind you of this small piece of historical literature that many of us consider to be more than just a piece of historical literature:

Article [IV]

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

constitutionus.com...
Stop violating our most sacred laws, please.
To close on a slightly lighter note, here's a Jean Michel Jarre music video with Snowden in it. Love Jarre's work, and it's nice to see him supporting Snowden in this fashion.


edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: damn you VEVO!

edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:31 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

Great thread, well done. I haven't got time just now to watch the vids but will later. That's one of the things that pisses me off with Trump, he claims he loves wikileaks and then calls Snowden a traitor. Quite the contradiction.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

I think we've had this thread before. Of course he is a hero. A whistleblower of course. Not a traitor.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

Frankly the way "some" people on here speak of Snowden and Assange is down right absurd, I would hope after being on here a bit you would start to see a bigger picture of what is going on. These guys made a quantum leap in our understanding of how we are manipulated by peoples that have no right doing what they do. Conspiracy theory turned into fact.

I personally think they where both extremely brave to do what they did, I mean Snowden may well never get back to his home soil and people calling for his execution is well troubling and shows the level that some people are at regarding what they think of their freedom...


RA
edit on 16-3-2017 by slider1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:39 AM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes

He did say such things awhile back, I'm not sure that he's repeated it recently though. I wonder if some of the military boys he's surrounded himself with might have had a little talk with Donald J, explained the way things are, perhaps broadened his perspective a little bit. I dunno.
Edit to add this video posted by Reason TV:

edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: add video



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:44 AM
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a reply to: reldra

If we did I've not seen it. I searched.
This video is hilariously informative, by the way:

edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: add video



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

As I've said on this person before and will continue to say, there is a fine line between whistleblower/hero and traitor.

He was good when he told the entire country of the NSA's domestic activities.

He crossed the line when he told other countries the NSA's foreign spying policies, activities, and tactics.

I commend him for what he did, but no, he is no hero. Traitor is a more appropriate title for him.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:03 AM
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Edward: I'm a Whistle Blower Not a Doctor Traitor.

Clinton: You're a Traitor!

Obama: He's a Traitor, stop interrupting my drive for world domination via the UN.

The Secret Gestapo: Traitor!

Most of the previous Admin: Traitor Traitor off with his head.

Do you see the problem?

I can see the problem. Everyone before Jan.20th with any kind of power, wanted to Crucify Snowden for telling YOU the truth.

It's so obvious..



edit on 16-3-2017 by Neith because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: Vector99

On that we shall have to disagree, then.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:08 AM
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Snowden Tip #1 - Take the Battery out of your phone and place both phone and battery in microwave oven to avoid detection and intervening on private conversations. Caution: Do Not Plug In. Do not Turn On.

Tip #2 - Your Gov't is Spying on you, Do not trust your Government. (then shows evidence of it).

Tip #3 - Refer back to #1 and #2 if confusion ensues.
edit on 16-3-2017 by Neith because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:10 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

He should have stopped with domestic affairs. Then I would call him a hero as well.

That said, I hope he doesn't ever come back to the US, he will be crucified by the courts to make an example. He is better off in Russia.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:11 AM
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Tip #4 - Do Not listen to Vector. He's clearly drinking right now.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:16 AM
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Im still stuck on violating an oath.

So hate me.. who cares. I dont violate oaths and I know how to keep a secret. Lord knows Ive kept where the husbands most favorite hideously ugly shorts and have never told anyone.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: Neith
Tip #4 - Do Not listen to Vector. He's clearly drinking right now.

I actually like what Snowden did. up to the point he started telling foreign governments when, where, and how we spied on them. That is the kind of thing that could potentially start a war.

Like I said, he should kept his leaks to domestic affairs only. I was all for the guy at that point.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:26 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: Neith
Tip #4 - Do Not listen to Vector. He's clearly drinking right now.

I actually like what Snowden did. up to the point he started telling foreign governments when, where, and how we spied on them. That is the kind of thing that could potentially start a war.

Like I said, he should kept his leaks to domestic affairs only. I was all for the guy at that point.

As if they didn't already know that. The only difference is now they can publicly bitch about it.

edit on 16-3-2017 by TheBadCabbie because: to add Snowden quote



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:29 AM
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a reply to: Vector99

I'd probably do the same thing he did. I mean, they must have their tentacles in deep to expose this stuff right, fifty five eye network and all. It may just be he did what he did in order to coerce the rest to admit it, or maybe he just wanted to see them all yell at each over it and get their stories wrong so people could see it for what it really was. Team Work done badly.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:29 AM
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a reply to: TheBadCabbie

I'm sure most knew, but did they know the full extent? Not likely.

He shouldn't have meddled in foreign affairs. For reasons like you said, now they can publicly bitch about it, and we cannot in return, because we haven't proven they do the same even though we all know they do.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:34 AM
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originally posted by: Neith
a reply to: Vector99

I'd probably do the same thing he did. I mean, they must have their tentacles in deep to expose this stuff right, fifty five eye network and all. It may just be he did what he did in order to coerce the rest to admit it, or maybe he just wanted to see them all yell at each over it and get their stories wrong so people could see it for what it really was. Team Work done badly.

Personally, I would have done exactly the same thing Snowden did, and stopped before releasing information regarding foreign surveillance. That info is for other governments to figure out on their own, and I know for sure all governments do it.

Then again I guess I am a hypocrite in a sense because I welcome vault 7 releases from wikileaks with open arms.

I just feel something else was behind Snowden's leaks.



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 03:37 AM
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If the roles were reversed and Snowden defected to the US with Russia's secrets, Putin would have sent an army Polonium bearing assassins and Snowden would have been dead for his treason rather quickly.



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