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EU Employers can now ban Burkhas and all established religious Jewellery

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posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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EU employers now have the right to ban Burkhas, Crosses and all other established religious apparel and jewellery.
The EU has just placed a ruling that allows employers to ban all established religious symbols from being worn by their employees. This is a great move to have a more secular space. I suppose it is fine if religious jewellery is worn out of sight. I do not think it will generate more hate crimes.



European Court of Justice

edit on 15-3-2017 by Tiger5 because: addition




posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Tiger5

Their nations, their laws, their rights.

Will be interesting to watch though.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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Ah, so inclusive!



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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EU Employers can now ban Burkhas and all established religious AND POLITICAL Jewellery.

That´s what we were told in Germany yesterday!

I am ok with banning religious/sects/cults stuff. Because religions are nothing more than fairy tales to control the people, a part of the people. One of the worst things mankind invented.

But on the other side, if we start to censor and ban everything, where will this end?
Maybe you will get arrested in the future, just because your clothes had the wrong colors???

Yeah, freedom...

edit on 15 3 2017 by DerBeobachter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:07 PM
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Interesting.

This isn't really in keeping with the all inclusive pro Muslim immigration policies the EU has been pushing.

I wonder what the underlying goal is here.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn

I wonder what the underlying goal is here.


“First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.”
Martin Niemöller



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: DerBeobachter

Ironic how you just made a post about how it's great that they came for the religious because you look down on them, but now you are quoting a religious person.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: DerBeobachter

it says employers can ban, not, gov'ts... so no, you might get fired for wearing the wrong clothes, but not arrested.
it's a workspace, kind of think that the employer should have the ability to limit the extent that hot topics like those that arise in politics, are allowed to raise havoc in their business.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: DerBeobachter

Ironic how you just made a post about how it's great that they came for the religious because you look down on them, but now you are quoting a religious person.


I knew that one "Schlaumeier" had to come up with this.
I am sorry that this man was right, even if he was a religious nut...

edit on 15 3 2017 by DerBeobachter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: dawnstar

First they came for the employees...



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Ah, so inclusive!


Wearing religious garb is by its very nature exclusive. It sets a person apart as they declare their adherence to one god or another. I'd say the same whether t as a burkha or a cross around your neck. You are still advocating one religion over another. NOT wearing religious stuff is more inclusive than wearing it. that's the whole point.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: Tiger5

Good.
The business which fought this case of wrongful dismissal had a blanket ban on employees expressing religious, political, and philosophical ideology through clothes, wristbands and anything else you may think of.

There was no discrimination against anyone, just a neutral work place dress and appearance code.
Don't like it, work somewhere else.
Your unverifiable religious beliefs stop you complying? Tough luck buttercup.

I support the right of employers to choose a neutral dress code. This was the correct judgment by the court in my opinion.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: DerBeobachter




First they came for the employees...


only the ones who had the audacity to think that their wages should be enough to provide a halfway decent living!!

I find it kind of puzzling, you have no problem with them banning religious items.. but don't believe that the should be allowed to ban political items? meanwhile there are companies out there, at least here in the state the will tell you what color pair of pants to wear, provide you with their shirts to wear, or, provide both pants and shirts. there are probably still some that are demanding that women wear high heels even. and, there are even some who will ban all types of jewelry... because it happens to pose a danger on production lines.
the employers seem to have quite a bit of freedom in this area.

have a question about the "burkas" though, which by what I read extends over to headscarves..
so, let's say you have an employee who just had surgery that required a good bit of hair to be shaved off, is anyone going to enforce a ban on head scarves on her, really? I kind of think that if they did, they might find that a number of female employees would be having a head shaving party after work in solidarity for the person or something.. but if an exception was made for her, then one would have to ask, why would her need to be able to wear be deemed more worthy than another person's freedom to practice their religion? a head scarf is a head scarf, and they come in many forms by the way.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: dawnstar

The headscarf is central to the case.
EU employers can legally dictate 'fashion' in workplace clothes, that has always been their freedom.
Employee was sacked for refusing to comply citing religious reasons. Employee went to court, employer defended arguing neutral policy so no religious, anti religious, philosophical or political messages/symbols etc at work.

The court agreed such a neutral policy is not discriminatory.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: Tiger5

Only bad that can come of this in my eyes is the slippery slope of banning more things and letting some people get away with religious jewelry and not others due to the type of religion



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: GraffikPleasure

That would be discriminatory though.
The court would quickly rule against discrimination against specific ideologies.

This decision affirms the right of businesses to have neutral dress and appearance code.
If an employees particular ideology requires public display so they are unable to comply with the neutral workplace rules then the employer can fire them legally.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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Well is about time somebody decided that we are to cater to everybody, no to one particular group or believes.

For some reason seems to me that the silent minority all over the world is now second class citizens over the vocal and very disruptive minority.

I know many people that feel intimidated by religious articles are clothing that some people wear.

Having a big Jesus crucifix handing in the neck of somebody can take the attention away from business, people may think that somebody is about to do some kind exorcism somewhere.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: marg6043

I would absolutely have a neutral appearance code if I employed staff.
Now if I find myself in that position I will have the right to do so, well, until Britain leaves the EU then it depends how legislation goes after that.
I imagine the judiciary here would make a similar judgement.
Neutral dress code is not discriminatory.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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Will they be able to bring it in retrospectively? You employ a Sikh person who's worked there for 10 years then say sorry you either remove your turban or we sack you. Will it lead to court cases?



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Tiger5
We've had previous news reports of employers being allowed to ban crosses.
So at least the new ruling establishes genuine equal treatment across religions.




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