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U.S. Marshals Arresting People Who Have Outstanding Student Loans: OPERATION ANACONDA SQUEEZE

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posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 10:44 PM
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Perhaps they should always start such with all of those in government along with any other "social" or "legal" experiment; before moving it into the public masses.

Yeah panic would quickly ensue... and those with legislative power would immediately put a stop to it. Kinda like the only reason cannabis was really a target and remains a target is due to the Bush family owning the drug testing nonsense; why canabis?

That crap stays in your system for about three weeks; easy target... everything else two days or less... not much money when someone says have a nice weekend Represenative Bob and then they go and do blow off of some D.C. hookers ass Friday night and are all nice and "clean" by the time Monday rolls around.

The system profits on both sides of the fence; over the table and under the table; over the counter and under the counter... it means more j-o-b-s and excuses to play cops and robbers within and over borders in systems of "control" simply to do one thing: Profit.




posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 02:13 AM
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Soo... if you don´t wanna go to jail because of debts, better stay uneducated?
Uh, the former USA will be so great in it´s future, greater than the whole universe...



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 02:53 AM
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a reply to: Julie Washington


Thrown in jail for a $1,500 outstanding student loan? This is insanity!


no insanity is not repaying a debt - and making no attemopts to do so for 29 years

his debt could have been fully repaided at just $8 / week



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 04:25 AM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz
so how much did it costs the system to: pay the arresting officer's salaries, set up a court date, get court personnel, find an arbitrator or collection agency to set up the payment plan collection and allocate the funds the the accounts receivable of the loan lender, send the loan information to the credit bureau agencies when it is finally payed in full...etc

so $1500 from 1987 cost our system $35-55k in dealings to collect the $1500.

'murka...


Don't worry, money taken from the EPA will fund this kinda stuff from now on.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: strongfp tt


Get this



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 05:25 AM
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a reply to: Julie Washington

He said he had a gun, that's enough to escalate things.

This would be a non story if it wasn't for the 7 armed marshals.

I'm not sure what you expect them to do?



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 06:23 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

lol perhaps he should have added; and a "special" note for the bank I was about to visit... they couldn;t say he was irrational; I mean he's gotta pay off that loan somehow.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: Julie Washington

WTF - SWAT teams over an outstanding Govt debt $1500? Maybe you Americans should use tanks on the IRS when they delay your tax refunds!!!!

EDIT If what Chadwickus says is correct then I can understand why the Police were armed
edit on 15-3-2017 by TheConstruKctionofLight because: edit



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: NoCorruptionAllowed




Owing money is not any kind of crime unless they can prove a person took money on loan with the intent to defraud the loaner


Have they been forwarding reminders for payment? In Australia unless there is an element of fraud you cant really be arrested for failing to repay the Govt.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: NoCorruptionAllowed




Owing money is not any kind of crime unless they can prove a person took money on loan with the intent to defraud the loaner


Have they been forwarding reminders for payment? In Australia unless there is an element of fraud you cant really be arrested for failing to repay the Govt.


I haven't received any reminder or even a bill except only 1 about 2 years ago, and they make it impossible to speak to anyone to repay the balance, at least for me they have done this. It is also illegal here to arrest without evidence of fraud. Looks like they have decided to forego the law on this one. What they have done is malicious and felonious prosecution and a violation of constitutional rights.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: NoCorruptionAllowed

I feel for you...our govt is doing something similar...long wait times to get assistance over the phone for social security recipients....



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 10:04 AM
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Complete fake news.

It costs $30,000 to $90,000 for Feds like the Marshals to arrest someone.

A propaganda scare story of complete lies is however now legal thanks to Obama, and that's all this is.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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So, basically--

The government's anaconda does want some if you're past-due, hun?



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 10:47 AM
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originally posted by: abe froman
a reply to: seasonal

They are also illegal.

That's why our blood sucking legal system throws you in jail for "contempt of court" instead of just calling it what it is, debtors prison.

To be fair, though, not paying back your debt is a breach of contract, which in and of itself is against the law.

"Contempt of court" is something completely different concerning the subject of the thread.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Julie Washington
a reply to: Chadwickus

Yes, I understand the story came out last year, but it is new news to me, and there haven't been any threads on it here at ATS.

Also, Aker's didn't have a gun... when confronted at home he didn't know who these people were and said he was going to go get a gun.... after negotiations he was arrested and hauled into court to settle his $1,500 student loan debt.

Really? All that was necessary over a $1,500 debt and prior refusal to appear in court.... How about maybe garnishing his paycheck, seizing assets, or liens on property.... isn't that typically how other unpaid debts are handled?

Good lord, I had no idea there was still Debtor's Prisons in our day and age. Here is a list of qualifications broken down by state.

I still think that U.S. Marshall's coming knocking on your door to arrest you is insanity.

Debtor's Prisons By State


Yea actually SkepticOverlord did a terrific thread on this very subject the day your article came out last year.

SO's thread

It doesn't matter if Akers actually had a gun or not, he said he did and that he was going to get it. That's usually a good way to get people with guns called on you during a confrontation. It's his own stupid self's fault for threatening to get a gun when he didn't even have one.

It appears that multiple attempts were made to deal with Akers' debt and he decided his solution was to just ignore it and hope it went away. Generally that's a good way to get somebody to come looking for you.

Yea it's asinine that people can be put in prison over student loans, but it's also asinine to use this clown as your poster-child for the issue when he seems to have almost gone out of his way to create the situation.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Julie Washington

they cant put you in jail for unpaid debt, but if a judge orders you to pay it and you don't you can be throw in jail for contempt. at least that is how it worked out for me 20 years ago.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6




Yea actually SkepticOverlord did a terrific thread on this very subject the day your article came out last year. SO's thread


Thank you Shamrock - When I searched the archive nothing came up.

SkepticOverlord's thread is far better than mine!

SkepticOverlord's Thread



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 07:04 PM
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originally posted by: luke1212
a reply to: Julie Washington

they cant put you in jail for unpaid debt, but if a judge orders you to pay it and you don't you can be throw in jail for contempt. at least that is how it worked out for me 20 years ago.


There was a supreme court case that barred all 50 states from doing this because it's an end run around the constitutional protections against debtors prisons, but many judges either ignore that precedent case, or they are uninformed of it. I know in my own city in Washington state that the judges there could care less about the laws when they are being paid to do whatever they think they can get away with, and they use the contempt toolkit very quickly here still. Only a good lawyer would be able to stop it, (maybe)..



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