It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

1930's Cadillac Abandoned in the Mountains

page: 1
24
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:
+5 more 
posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:29 AM
link   


In the early 1900's logging dominated what would become The Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Remnants of the industry remain and can be seen in various mountain areas.

In the video you will see the hike along an abandoned logging route that includes many historical places related to the logging. The hike takes place along an abandoned logging railway, where logging trains would transport materials and lumber into and out of the area.

Many of the larger waterfalls were used as dams. The dam would be constructed and the resulting pool would be filled with cut lumber. Once the pool was full of lumber, the dam would be blown up and the lumber would be washed down river.

One of the most intriguing relics can be found hidden just off the trail. It is a 1930's era Cadillac that was abandoned by one of the logging bosses when the operation shut down. It's very strange to see the old car sitting in the middle of nowhere.

If you have any questions about the hike, I'll do my best to answer them.




posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:40 AM
link   
a reply to: esteay812

I wonder how things like a Cadillac got left out there. Was it broken down? Did things go sideways that fast?



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:43 AM
link   
a reply to: esteay812

Wish I was there right now.
Thanks for sharing such stunning and peaceful beauty.




posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:44 AM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

Logging is rough. When the weather acts up you can lose things fast.
I lost a skidder to sugar sand in the floods up here 6 years ago. We got 4 in of rain in an hour and half.
My Oshkosh was plowing road with the front bumper. We ended up with 12-14" of rain in 36 hours. Most of superior, wi and duluth, mn was flooded out.
edit on 3142017 by Natas0114 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:48 AM
link   
My dad talked about equipment used in building the Alaska pipeline or hiway just being left behind or pushed into lakes, the stuff paid for itself and was costly to trasnport..a personal ride is a bit different.
Maybe broke down..did you check for a skeleton



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:50 AM
link   
a reply to: Natas0114

Yeah, there are a lot of ways to lose things, even when they are the size of a car or larger. I think the story goes that the logging operation shut down and the car was either stuck or the road was impassable at the time, so they just left it behind when they cleared out.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:54 AM
link   
a reply to: vonclod

I am always looking for crazy stuff on the trails. A while back I found a massive timber rattler. I walked right up on it because it was camouflaged so well. It must've been 5' long. It was really impressive and really scary at the same time.

I didn't find a skeleton on this trip, mainly because I felt like I was being stalked by a mountain lion, lol. They are not confirmed to be here, but there have been tons of sightings lately. I know how to deal with a black bear, a big buck, or a bull elk, but I have no clue how to shake a mountain lion.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:01 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812
Thank you for this beautiful post!!! I have about a month and a half before I am in the Great Smokey Mountains. I can't wait!!!!! Gonna get me some Salted Caramel Whiskey!!!! Woohoo!



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:03 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812

.454 casull


Otherwise the mountain lion shakes you.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:03 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812

The Cadillac is interesting, but the S&f is because of the gorgeous landscape. In summer, I would love to folic in that creek with my dogs!



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:08 PM
link   
a reply to: Martin75

Let me know when you're gonna be here and I can tell you some of the stuff to check out, that is, if you aren't already really familiar with the area.

There's a secret cemetery right in the middle of downtown Gatlinburg that's pretty neat, it you're not really into hiking.

Just a couple more weeks and all the flowers and plants will be turned on. It's gonna look crazy seeing the new growth surrounding all the charred trees from the wildfire. Should really be something to see.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:14 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812
Yes I am so excited. We got lucky, our honeymoon cabin is still standing. The big resort right behind us burnt so we thought we had lost it.

I absolutely LOVE Gatlinburg and although I like to think I "know" all the spots, I'm sure there are some you can point me to that I have never found.

Our cabin is about 1 1/2 miles up Ski Mountain Rd on Holly Branch Rd.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:14 PM
link   
Someone took the engine



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:15 PM
link   
a reply to: angeldoll

There was something pretty neat about this hike. It had been pretty warm here days before, then turned cold and got a few inches of snow. It had already started warming up the morning of this hike, the temperature was about 50dF. It was really comfortable weather for the hike and all the melting snow from above had the rivers swollen pretty well.

There was just enough snow to keep people off the trail and make the views incredible. I saw 2 other hikers the whole time - an 8.5mi round trip.

You can swim anywhere you want to in the mountains and there are lots of good holes you can find all along the trail. If you get a chane to visit and decide to jump in the river, just be sure to check the depth first and resist the temptation to go under a waterfall.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:20 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812


resist the temptation to go under a waterfall.


But but but, I love to sit behind waterfalls. It makes me all giggly and peaceful.
What might happen?



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:21 PM
link   
a reply to: esteay812

Growing up in Vancouver in the 70's/80's I lived next to a ravine with a creek, and at the bottom was a 55 chevy and a sedan delivery of simular..perhaps a bit earlier age.
We as kids loved to explore and always wondered what happened and how they got there..never did find out. I bet still some debris there to this day.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Martin75

Yeah, Chalet Village got hit pretty hard there. Surprising how it burned too, cabins burned everywhere and then a random cabin in the middle of it all, untouched.

I'd say try the Middle Prong Trail, near Cades Cove. That's where this video was made. It's a really easy walk/hike and has more scenery than pretty much any other trail I can think of. You can walk 1/4 mile and see great waterfalls or you can go 4+ miles to Indian Flats and see the big waterfall that's toward the end of the video.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:23 PM
link   
a reply to: angeldoll

Death could occur. Really, some of these waterfalls are a lot stronger than they seem. They are really bad about pushing you under water into a hidden hole and holding you there. As long as you use caution, you should be OK.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 12:25 PM
link   
a reply to: vonclod

I bet there are parts of it still there, unless someone had the bright idea to try and salvage it or something.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 02:46 PM
link   
Awesome piece of history.



new topics

top topics



 
24
<<   2 >>

log in

join