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Animal vs. Plant Protein

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posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 08:26 AM
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We are taught that protein is a super nutrient that will make us lean, strong, and healthy. We need protein, but more is not necessarily better, and high-protein foods are not always healthful.

Why do we need protein?

In every cell in the human body, the DNA contains a code that tells the cell which proteins to make. Proteins have a lot of different roles in the body, some provide structure like collagen, some facilitate contact or movement, and others act as enzymes, signals, receptors, or transporters. In order to make all of these proteins, we have to consume protein and break it down into its constituent amino acids.

High-protein diets

High-protein foods do tend to be low in glycemic load. This is what the high-protein, low-carb diets get right. They avoid dangerous high-glycemic refined carbohydrates—sugar, white rice, and white flour products. In the process, they also limit dangerous trans fats. It is important to remember though, just like excess carbohydrate and fat calories, if you take in more protein calories than your body can use right away, those calories get stored as fat.

Refined carbohydrates are empty calories that are absorbed quickly, and they lead to overeating. Foods that are higher in protein, fiber, and/or resistant starch provide the satiety factor that is missing in refined carbohydrates and help to prevent blood glucose spikes, so we are not driven to overeat. For some people, high protein diets can be successful for weight loss in the short-term, but because they are so focused on animal foods, they are dangerous in the long-term. Low-carbohydrate/high-protein diets have been linked to increased risk of heart disease, cancer and premature death.

Plant protein vs. animal protein

Although plant protein is often described as “incomplete,” it has been known for many years that all plant foods contain all of the amino acids necessary for life. Different plant foods may be low in a certain essential amino acid, but as long you are eating a variety of plant foods, you will get adequate amounts—but not too much—of all the essential amino acids.

Animal protein and plant protein both provide us with adequate amounts of all of the amino acids, but animal protein is more concentrated in complete protein of a high biological value, so the body does not have to wait to utilize it to be combined with amino acids from other foods. Their proteins get absorbed and utilzed quickly, especially the amino acids that raise growth promoting hormones. For these reasons animal protein increases the body’s production of a hormone called IGF-1, which is associated with aging and an increased risk of several different cancers.

One interesting study followed over 85,000 women and 44,000 men for more than 20 years, (26 years in women and 20 years in men) recording over 12,500 deaths. This research team found animal protein-rich diets were associated with a 43% increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer, compared to diets low in animal protein. In addition to animal protein, a diet high in animal products delivers additional harmful, pro-inflammatory, or pro-oxidant substances. Animal foods are higher in arachidonic acid, saturated fat, carnitine and choline, heme iron, substances linked to inflammation, premature aging and other diseases.

How much protein?

The number of grams of protein humans need in a day has been estimated at 0.8 g/kg/day (about 36 grams of protein per 100 pounds of body weight). However, it is not important to count the number of grams of protein in the food you eat to make sure you reach this number. If you are eating a variety of foods, it is almost impossible to consume too little protein. For a typical day, a Nutritarian menu of 1700-1800 calories provides approximately 60-70 grams of protein. Green vegetables, seeds, nuts and beans are all relatively rich in protein. The point is that when you eat an anti-cancer diet to promote longevity, you strive to consume more of these low glycemic colorful plants, which contain plenty of protein, to secure adequate amounts even with the increased needs of aging. It is rare that a person needs to eat animal products to get sufficient protein when eating a Nutritarian diet, but even those individuals that require that, can do so with only a small amount, avoiding the dangers of too much animal products.

It is these features that lead to the dramatic disease-protective lifespan benefits. Eat Nutritarian, and forget about protein, you will automatically get the right amount; not too much and not too little.




posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Nice put. Some real information.

Re emphasizing one thing, the more processed and refined foods are the less food value they contain.

White flour, white rice, white sugar, all processed and refined too much. Same with additives, preservatives, GMOs and toxins.

Good luck removing all that from your daily poison. The best one can hope to do nowadays is make sure you also drink plenty so the body can de toxify itself. The best thing to stay hydrated is water, distilled water, lots of it.

An eight ounce glass in the morning, after meals and before bed.

glick, glick, glick...



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Agree! It's very difficult these days sticking to a diet plan that removes all of the poisons!

We can try our best to look for most organic, whole and real foods out there but with all of the new findings and information coming out daily, you just never know.

Best practice is to grow your own, but that's not always possible.

Yes... H2o! Super important!



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 09:27 AM
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I have been a vegetarian since I left the Armed Forces, and I lift heavy weights so my build has always been good. I'm not quite so good at keeping up the cardio because quite frankly it bores the hell out of me. Since I hit my forties and quit smoking I have had a slight increase in body fat that would not to shift.

Since I did not want to give up alcohol (my one and only vice) I decided to try a vegan diet. After one week I lost two and a half pounds and had to make another hole in my belt and have not felt hungry. My muscle mass has noticeably increased and I feel much more energised.

When I hear people say you need animal protein to build muscle mass I always think of the thirty stone silver back Gorilla at my local zoo that is fed solely and fruit and veg, or the rippling muscle of thoroughbred racehorses. There is biological process in you r body that requires animal fat to function effectively.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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but as long you are eating a variety of plant foods, you will get adequate amounts—


MOST people cannot do this....MOST. As in....at least 6 BILLION people.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 09:58 AM
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The condition of the animals environment changes the chem profile that you take in when you eat it. Grass Fed, pastured beef is very different from Feed lot, corn fed beef. The grains are what creates the high arachidonic acid profile of feed lot meat.

Also it is impossible to get adequate B12 from a vegetarian diet. B12 is only from animal products naturally.

The other issue is adequate amounts of DHA. You only get DHA directly from Fish. You can turn ALA from flax(mainly) into DHA but at a 60-1 loss, meaning you need to eat 60x the amount of flax as you would of fish, or fish oil. Every cell membrane in your body is made of EPA/DHA which is derived from Fish Oil, again from almost nowhere else.

Long story short. You need to eat fish at least.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: tribal



but as long you are eating a variety of plant foods, you will get adequate amounts—


MOST people cannot do this....MOST. As in....at least 6 BILLION people.


And why is it that most people can't do this?



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:13 AM
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Unfortunately universal pasture feeding is completely unsustainable.

a reply to: zardust



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:14 AM
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I've found that as I get older, if I have to do any exercise, even snow shovelling, I have to eat (or drink) protein first.
I noticed this when I was shovelling snow a few years ago - I would get an ammonia like taste/smell in the back of my throat for awhile after, and light dizziness.
People always said "carb up", but that didn't make any difference.
I researched online and on the livestrong site, I finally found what he referred to as catabolism, which I don't totally understand, it's to do with a protein breakdown (?)

If I have even a small amount of protein, in any form, then exercise, I don't get the problem.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: zardust
The condition of the animals environment changes the chem profile that you take in when you eat it. Grass Fed, pastured beef is very different from Feed lot, corn fed beef. The grains are what creates the high arachidonic acid profile of feed lot meat.

Also it is impossible to get adequate B12 from a vegetarian diet. B12 is only from animal products naturally.

The other issue is adequate amounts of DHA. You only get DHA directly from Fish. You can turn ALA from flax(mainly) into DHA but at a 60-1 loss, meaning you need to eat 60x the amount of flax as you would of fish, or fish oil. Every cell membrane in your body is made of EPA/DHA which is derived from Fish Oil, again from almost nowhere else.

Long story short. You need to eat fish at least.


While that might be true, I also have ethical reasons for not eating animals. Also, like "organic", just because a product states an animal is "grass fed", it doesn't also mean they are not given antibiotics and other chemicals in another form of fashion. Just like anything else you pick up in the grocery store, it behooves the consumer to read nutritional labels. The real bottom line is two-fold. One, animal consumption causes a variety of health problems as we age going way beyond what the animal is fed, that's only part of it. Two, people are too focused on what they like and what they might have to give up vs. the future and what they have to gain. Instant gratification is an issue.

As far as B12 goes, what you stated is true except that soy products, many fermented vegetable products and mushrooms are a source of B12. Most Vegans supplement. All of the other micro-nutrients can be found in plant based foods.

You can eat all the fish you want. Our oceans are so polluted I wouldn't go near it. But that's me. To each their own.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
I've found that as I get older, if I have to do any exercise, even snow shovelling, I have to eat (or drink) protein first.
I noticed this when I was shovelling snow a few years ago - I would get an ammonia like taste/smell in the back of my throat for awhile after, and light dizziness.
People always said "carb up", but that didn't make any difference.
I researched online and on the livestrong site, I finally found what he referred to as catabolism, which I don't totally understand, it's to do with a protein breakdown (?)

If I have even a small amount of protein, in any form, then exercise, I don't get the problem.


Catabolism is when your body begins to consume it's own protein/muscle because you are either not eating enough in general (macro's for your body to use for performance), or you're missing some key nutrients in your diet.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: CulturalResilience
I have been a vegetarian since I left the Armed Forces, and I lift heavy weights so my build has always been good. I'm not quite so good at keeping up the cardio because quite frankly it bores the hell out of me. Since I hit my forties and quit smoking I have had a slight increase in body fat that would not to shift.

Since I did not want to give up alcohol (my one and only vice) I decided to try a vegan diet. After one week I lost two and a half pounds and had to make another hole in my belt and have not felt hungry. My muscle mass has noticeably increased and I feel much more energised.

When I hear people say you need animal protein to build muscle mass I always think of the thirty stone silver back Gorilla at my local zoo that is fed solely and fruit and veg, or the rippling muscle of thoroughbred racehorses. There is biological process in you r body that requires animal fat to function effectively.



Right, some of the worlds most powerful creatures are vegans

My spinach has more protein than your steak! LOL!

I also lift heavy and practice Krav and Muay Thai, I am muscular and lean and eat plants!



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Yep. And I had thought I was getting a good variety of foods in my diet, but I think as we get older we need to make sure that we don't consume so many waste calories on junk food.
When I was younger, it didn't seem to matter what I ate, and I had to build muscle to have shape. I was a skinny girl growing up.
Now, I retain more weight, 😕 and calories need to be healthier.
With age, we seem to absorb more of the bad, and have to eat much better for proper nutrition.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

Where do you get collagen for your bones, cartilage and skin? Plants don't contain it. Are you scientifically mixing lysine and proline from various sources or you don't care much? I was mostly vegetarian for two decades and my connective tissue sucks badly. Arthritis, atopic dermatitis, allergies. I was thinking that I have Lyme but maybe gluten is the problem. After multiple vaccines (yeah, military shots) I got a grass allergy and wheat is kind of grass too. Our bodies don't like grains even without allergy. It contains many self-protective substances. Without grains it leaves you with potatoes, rice and indigestible legumes. Potatoes are even worse for cartilage probably because of solanine and chaconine. Btw Tomatoes belong to Nightshade family too and it's always harvested unrippen if you don't grow your own!

I'm actually switching to paleo diet as I type. Infowars Caveman paleo style! Screw it, without working cartilage I'm not able to work. This estrogenic, vegetarian diet is gonna kill me in this way. I've just started with bone broth, marine collagen and strictly testosterone herbs. No beer anymore. They are pouring us with beer everywhere to keep us weak, feminized and sedated lol. I'm a wine-guy from now!



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

If you don't know already, check out Mike's Daily Apple, unsure if I can link and endorse his site but it's that + .com.

By far the most reasonable diet/exercise regime, presented with facts and citations, unlike the OP.

No offence OP, but I disagree with a lot of what you have said. Meat is not bad for you. Saturated fat is not bad for you. Heme iron is not bad for you (it's much more bioavailable than plant based iron). Like anything though, you must have a diverse diet, low on processed foods.

Look deeper into the research that states meat is bad for you. EVERY TIME I see one of these studies, it's meat eaters eating burgers, sausages bacon and steak. Even eating good quality steak for dinner every night would probably not be good for you in the long run.

But a healthy diet will include animal products EVERY DAY. Red meat maybe 3 times a week, fish and poultry the rest, lots of eggs and lots of animal fats.

If animal fat is so bad for you why does your body store energy as SATURATED FAT?? When someone is losing weight, they could be losing 3-4 lbs a week of fat, but that fat is being absorbed. In essence, they are ingesting 3-4 lbs of saturated fat (basically lard) a week, but noone would call that unhealthy.



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Yep. And I had thought I was getting a good variety of foods in my diet, but I think as we get older we need to make sure that we don't consume so many waste calories on junk food.
When I was younger, it didn't seem to matter what I ate, and I had to build muscle to have shape. I was a skinny girl growing up.
Now, I retain more weight, 😕 and calories need to be healthier.
With age, we seem to absorb more of the bad, and have to eat much better for proper nutrition.


I know right?
When I was younger I think I lived on a diet of Dorito's and Mountain Dew! haha!



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: PapagiorgioCZ
a reply to: CulturalResilience

Where do you get collagen for your bones, cartilage and skin? Plants don't contain it. Are you scientifically mixing lysine and proline from various sources or you don't care much? I was mostly vegetarian for two decades and my connective tissue sucks badly. Arthritis, atopic dermatitis, allergies. I was thinking that I have Lyme but maybe gluten is the problem. After multiple vaccines (yeah, military shots) I got a grass allergy and wheat is kind of grass too. Our bodies don't like grains even without allergy. It contains many self-protective substances. Without grains it leaves you with potatoes, rice and indigestible legumes. Potatoes are even worse for cartilage probably because of solanine and chaconine. Btw Tomatoes belong to Nightshade family too and it's always harvested unrippen if you don't grow your own!

I'm actually switching to paleo diet as I type. Infowars Caveman paleo style! Screw it, without working cartilage I'm not able to work. This estrogenic, vegetarian diet is gonna kill me in this way. I've just started with bone broth, marine collagen and strictly testosterone herbs. No beer anymore. They are pouring us with beer everywhere to keep us weak, feminized and sedated lol. I'm a wine-guy from now!


For cartilage repair Vegan style I'd recommend researching ginger and willow root as well as bumping vitamin's A, C, D and K for inflammation and repair and also research the benefits of apricot, broccoli, swiss chard, watercress, parsley and kale... all useful for building and supporting cartilage. For straight up arthritis, do some research on 'Just Black Cherry Juice'.

Foods containing vitamin A, C, D and K are also beneficial. Meat, liver, cheese, eggs, fish, apricot, broccoli, Swiss chard, watercress, parsley, kale, all are useful in building and supporting the cartilage.

I did the Paleo thing for a while, also did the slow-carb thing and every other thing you can think of. I didn't have great results on any of those things but some folks really thrive on them. I just don't think they are sustainable...



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: Dem0nc1eaner
a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

If you don't know already, check out Mike's Daily Apple, unsure if I can link and endorse his site but it's that + .com.

By far the most reasonable diet/exercise regime, presented with facts and citations, unlike the OP.

No offence OP, but I disagree with a lot of what you have said. Meat is not bad for you. Saturated fat is not bad for you. Heme iron is not bad for you (it's much more bioavailable than plant based iron). Like anything though, you must have a diverse diet, low on processed foods.

Look deeper into the research that states meat is bad for you. EVERY TIME I see one of these studies, it's meat eaters eating burgers, sausages bacon and steak. Even eating good quality steak for dinner every night would probably not be good for you in the long run.

But a healthy diet will include animal products EVERY DAY. Red meat maybe 3 times a week, fish and poultry the rest, lots of eggs and lots of animal fats.

If animal fat is so bad for you why does your body store energy as SATURATED FAT?? When someone is losing weight, they could be losing 3-4 lbs a week of fat, but that fat is being absorbed. In essence, they are ingesting 3-4 lbs of saturated fat (basically lard) a week, but noone would call that unhealthy.


I Love Marks' Daily Apple and that's perfectly OK if you don't agree with me, no need to be sorry. To each their own. My post wasn't up for debate, just wanted to share some information with like-minded individuals.

Like I said, I also have ethical reasons for not eating animal products.

OH... and for readers, if you do check out Mark's Daily Apple please read what Mark has to say, a lot of the folks that post there are all about bro-science and supplementation.
edit on 13-3-2017 by Scorpiogurl because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Scorpiogurl

I think basically everyone would benefit hugely from cutting out sugar and wheat, whatever else you eat whether vegan, veggie or carnivorous!



posted on Mar, 13 2017 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: Dem0nc1eaner
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

I think basically everyone would benefit hugely from cutting out sugar and wheat, whatever else you eat whether vegan, veggie or carnivorous!


Oh totally agree!




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