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US Government Issues NASA Demand - ‘Get Humans to Mars By 2033’

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posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:22 AM
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Both chambers of Congress just passed the NASA Authorization Act of 2017. With this transformative development, the space agency got a lot more than just $19.508 billion in funding. They also got a very clear mandate: Get humanity to Mars.

...In order to get to Mars by the 2030s, Congress is asking NASA to develop “an initial human exploration roadmap” that must be submitted before December 1, 2017.

...The document states, “A human exploration roadmap should begin with low-Earth orbit, then address in greater detail progress beyond low-Earth orbit to cis-lunar space, and then address future missions aimed at human arrival and activities near and then on the surface of Mars.”

US Government Issues NASA Demand - ‘Get Humans to Mars By 2033’

So there you have it. We're gonna colonize Mars. Space workers and travellers will get sick of course. Acceleration, microgravity, radiation-exposure, deceleration and more all trigger disease-causing epigenetic effects - like partial blindness - that can be passed on and inherited.

Note that the US government will not be responsible for your problems without comprehensive "universal coverage." And private insurance companies are ready to disqualify epigenetic diseases and susceptibilities too.

So best get an airtight, guaranteed lifelong comprehensive health package before you go.

Space Leaves Astronauts Partially Blind

Life Insurance Company Bypasses Genetic Discrimination Laws with Epigenetic Workaround


More on the Mars mandate:


Congress just passed a bill that tells NASA to send humans to Mars by 2033

For the first time in more than six years, both chambers of Congress passed a bill that approves funding for NASA and gives the space agency new mandates.

The NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017 is a bill that the Senate and House collaborated on for months, and it appropriates $19.5 billion to the agency. (NASA received $19.3 billion in 2016, or 0.5% of the total federal budget.)

When the Senate brought the bill before the House of Representatives for a vote on March 7, "no members spoke against the bill" and it passed, according to Jeff Foust at Space News.





edit on 10/3/17 by soficrow because: add link




posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

From the article...


A human exploration roadmap should begin with low-Earth orbit before December 1, 2017.


You'd think they would have had the low earth orbit logistics figured by now....baby steps?

Overall though aiming for Mars is is great

thanks



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:35 AM
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And so Elysium is born...

lol

Mars is hostile to life. IMO, they want to mine it sure, precious stuff is just lying around on the surface to sweep up and return.

Be the first Tycoon on your Manhattan block to have an ingot of Mars gold on your desk.

Be the first corporation to drop a ton of refined mars gold on a major city by accident.

(Popcorn)

edit on 10-3-2017 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: intrptr




Mars is hostile to life.


Got to start somewhere...farms start with uncleared land...it takes time and investment.
Corporations will benefit and monopolize; the taxpayer may see a return on their investment trickled down in a 100 years time. I know, I'm cynical.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: soficrow

From the article...


A human exploration roadmap should begin with low-Earth orbit before December 1, 2017.


You'd think they would have had the low earth orbit logistics figured by now....baby steps?

Overall though aiming for Mars is is great

thanks

Thats what the space shuttle and the ISS were originally slated for, those 'baby steps'. The chain was load carry to orbit via shuttle to build the space station, to build lunar trajectory craft to establish bases on the Moon, then jump from the moon to Mars.

It was way more expensive and costly (Challenger) than anyone figured. Or was total BS. The most expensive space stuff like development of hi tech, medicine, spying from orbit and military applications are reserved for the rich, not the proles.
edit on 10-3-2017 by intrptr because: spelling


+4 more 
posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 09:51 AM
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I am seriously confused here. Why is space exploration a bad thing?

Do people really hate cell phones? Computers? The Internet? GPS? All these things were developed from technology designed to allow space exploration. If JFK had not demanded we stand on the moon, many of them probably wouldn't exist. Even if they did, they would not be as developed as they are today.

Space exploration creates new technology, provides new high-paying jobs, gives a national sense of pride, and encourages out-of-the-box thinking. It increases our knowledge not just of space, but of the world around us.

But yeah, I guess I get it. Bad because.... Trump! Better to wallow in ignorance, doom ourselves to mediocrity, curl up in a fetal position with our ears covered and yell "NANANANANA!" all day long than to try to accomplish anything important that might get written in a history book someday as Trump's achievement.

Not me. I'm going to help us get to Mars. If anyone is still laying in that fetal position when I get done, I'll kick you in the side and call a diaper service for you when we get done.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Got to start somewhere...farms start with uncleared land...it takes time and investment.

Our money, their profit. Our sweat and toil, their reward.

"Conquering Mars" is a lot more complex and expensive than they are making it out to be. Especially considering the necessary stages of development required. Like the initial moon landings were, they have to approach it the same way again, in stages.

Meaning ten twelve trip$ for each phaSe of development. Including accident$ and disaster$.

One micrometeorite, solar flare or launch failure can set the program back a decade or two, destroy popular interest and cause whole programs to be scrapped, due to lack of interest, cost or even corruption. Nowadays it seems every budget is a trillion dollars of black hole waste. The original moon missions were discontinued due to boredom, if you can believe that.

just saying...

Unless they are aware and aren't telling about a 'slate wiper' asteroid or comet they found thats heading our way and suddenly are infused wth survival instinct, this is another ruse to garner money for more projects that are disguised as Humanitarian and Necessary up front, but are really hidden agendas on the part of any number of oligarchal and military 'experts'.

Sorry for the cynicism, been around monitoring the world for too long to trust the the gubment and their spokespersons about it.

"I don't believe anything my government tells me...nothing." --George Carlin



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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Hmmm would that be 19THOUSAND and 508 billions
Or 19 point 508 billions?!?!?!?

And about all the hazards...GET OVER IT......
There IS a way to fix those problems, we
just have to find it...



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:27 AM
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NASA needs a focused dircetion! Well done trump for putting a boot up NASA arse!



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
I am seriously confused here. Why is space exploration a bad thing?

.... Bad because.... Trump!

TheRedneck



Hmm. Not everything is about party politics. ...When was Trump inaugurated?



...The NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017 is a bill that the Senate and House collaborated on for months





Good job btw! Way to polarize, divide, sow hostility, hatred etc.





edit on 10/3/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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I would love to see human get to Mars, and always have since I was a kid and wanted to be an astronaut.

But as the OP suggests, "getting there" is only one part of the problem. The human body is not meant to withstand the space environment for any length of time. In addition to radiation (from which astronauts on the Space Station are shielded partially by Earth's fields), there are the extreme risks of long term exposure to microgravity, including loss of eye sight (as mentioned in the OP), fluid buildup, and the very serious deterioration of muscle/bone mass.

The two astronauts who spent almost a year on the ISS and who recently returned to Earth could barely even stand because of bodily degeneration.

Until that is figured out, a (human-led) mission to Mars is simply far too risky, not to mention returning from the surface.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
I would love to see human get to Mars, and always have since I was a kid and wanted to be an astronaut.

But as the OP suggests, "getting there" is only one part of the problem. The human body is not meant to withstand the space environment for any length of time. In addition to radiation (from which astronauts on the Space Station are shielded partially by Earth's fields), there are the extreme risks of long term exposure to microgravity, including loss of eye sight (as mentioned in the OP), fluid buildup, and the very serious deterioration of muscle/bone mass.

The two astronauts who spent almost a year on the ISS and who recently returned to Earth could barely even stand because of bodily degeneration.

Until that is figured out, a (human-led) mission to Mars is simply far too risky, not to mention returning from the surface.


Nice job!

...I think we can work it out - IF the problems are not brushed under the carpet. They must be acknowledged truthfully, and the commitment made to solve them.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

One has to wonder why 2033?

What happens around then that makes us humans being there a priority?

Mars will be tough to colonize at first, she has no magnetosphere thus limited atmospheric protection from radiation, and dust storms that can run wild over a significant percentage of the planet.

Not saying it cant be done all the same, and hopefully it will.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: soficrow

One has to wonder why 2033?

What happens around then that makes us humans being there a priority?



One does wonder, doesn't one.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

Then please, please, please explain to me why space exploration is a bad thing? If I assumed wrong, so be it, but I honestly don't see another explanation.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Are you suggesting I think or said space exploration is a bad thing?



....because I don't.



edit on 10/3/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

America needs to stop being such risk avoding pussys.

Yes there are health risk

But these astronauts will be WILLING VOLENTEERS. If they want to take the risk then let them!



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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Building the Interstate highway system cost thousands of lives. People died of exposure, disease, and killed by wildlife right here in Florida, especially going South through the Everglades. Other states had their own hazards over time. The guilt does not seem to stop people from using the interstate system.

Point is, infrastructure does not just cost money, it usually costs lives too. That is a sacrifice the individual makes though with knowledge of the risk.

NASA and subcontractors do not force people to work for them. People will be told of the dangers of the interstellar exploration and infrastructure development before they signup, and there will still be more than enough people to sign up. Humans will sacrifice everything usually in an effort to provide for family. SO the human toll, while sad, is necessary. Except for the fact that we live in the future now, and most likely the super dangerous "death imminently likely" type jobs will probably be handled by machines.

But there seems to be a strange urgency to this Mars trip, almost as if it is not an option ...



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry



...People will be told of the dangers of the interstellar exploration and infrastructure development before they signup





The cover-ups date back to the 1960's. Acceleration, microgravity, radiation-exposure, deceleration and more all trigger disease-causing epigenetic effects that can be passed on and inherited. The things we're hearing about now - like partial blindness - are just the tip of the tip.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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