Surya 1 and 2 : India's ICBM's

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posted on Feb, 1 2005 @ 03:21 AM
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The Surya-1 is an intercontinental-range, surface-based, solid and liquid propellant ballistic missile under development. It is based upon a space launch vehicle being developed by India’s space program to improve the nation’s aerospace industry. This project would result in India’s first intercontinental-range ballistic missile.

The Surya-1 and -2 will be classified as a strategic weapon. It will likely be used to extend the Indian nuclear deterrent force to targets deeper within China. India can only hit a limited number of targets within China, even upon the completion of the Agni-3 missile. The development of a true ICBM would make almost any strategic target within China vulnerable and decrease India’s relative weakness. This would develop a credible deterrent for India against any Chinese aggression.

The Surya-1 will have an expected range of some 8,000 km (4971 miles). It reportedly has a length of 40 m and a launch weight of 80,000 kg. As the missile has yet to be developed, the payload and warhead are as yet unknown. It is believed to be a three-stage design, with the first two stages using solid propellant and the third-stage using liquid.

The Surya-2 is a longer-ranged variant of the Surya-1. It has a reported range of 12,000 km (7456 miles). This is likely accomplished by decreasing the payload.

The first test flight is expected in 2005 and the Surya-1 is expected to enter service in 2008.

Class: ICBM
Basing: Surface based
Length: 40.00 m
Launch Weight: 80,000 kg
Propulsion: First/second stage solid, third liquid
Range: 8,000, 12,000 km
Status: Development / Developed to be tested
In Service: Exp. 2008




posted on Feb, 1 2005 @ 11:05 PM
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India alredy have cryogenic engines for their space launch vehicles .

It is believed that this tech will be used in the ICBM's





Read :

GSLV (Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle)

ASLV - Augumented Satellite Launch Vehicle

PSLV - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle

SLV - Satellite Launch Vehicle



posted on Feb, 1 2005 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by Stealth Spy
India alredy have cryogenic engines for their space launch vehicles .

It is believed that this tech will be used in the ICBM's



Cryogenics are very poorly suited to ICBM's. It takes a signifigant amount of time to fuel, and the process of fueling is very sensitive, not the best if you're under attack.

I'd be surprised if they didn't try to use a large solid fuel engine with some sort of hypergolic (stable liquid fuel) post-boost vehicle - like pretty much every modern Russian and US ICBM. I would think they would have the technology for this.

The tricky part of ICBM design is making the warhead smaller and more accurate and making an accurate, reliable, independant navigation system.



posted on Feb, 2 2005 @ 12:03 AM
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Most likely it would be a development from the Agni ICBM, and will use components from the SLVs. The speculation is that the first version Surya will comprise 2 stages, first a cryogenic and then solid-fuel second phase, but I'm not too knowlageable in this field and not sure of specifics. I do know that India is only begining to master rocket engine technology, and an indigenous cryogenic engine has been developed by the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPCS) in Trivandrum, and will unveiled this year. But this is designed for satellite launchers.

India has seen success at miniturizing nuclear warheads, and has partnered with Russia to develop the GLONASS navigation system, a main reason for which is strategic.

I don't think there is a big impetus in India for developing the Surya as yet, especially not until GLONASS is somewhat operational. It makes sense, as India's nuclear program is developed around the doctrine of 'credible minimum deterrance.' The Prithvis and Agnis do just fine in keeping away hostile nuclear states for the moment, and in a decade or so when India's growing power will see the remote potential for American/Western strategic concern ('threat' is too strong a word), we'll see the program more developed. Most likely by then India would have mastered those technologies.

-Raj



posted on Feb, 2 2005 @ 11:46 AM
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The Agni -3 is an IRBM



IRBM Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile. A ballistic missile having a range of 2,750 km to 5,000 km.

ICBM Intercontinental Ballistic Missile. A ballistic missile with a range in excess of 5,000 km. The term ICBM applies only to land-based systems, to differentiate them from submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs).

source : www.missilethreat.com...



-----------

Agni 3


Country: India
Class: IRBM
Propulsion: 3-stage solid/liquid
Range: 5,000 km
Status: Development
In Service: Exp. 2005


Details

The Agni-3 is an intermediate-range, surface-based, solid and liquid propellant ballistic missile. It is still in development and is expected to utilize the Agni-2 for its second and third stages. It is believed to be a three-stage missile created by adding a third stage onto the first and second stages of the Agni-2. It will probably be deployed from either mobile launch vehicles that are road or rail mobile. It will likely be equipped with an inertial guidance systems with an improved optical or radar terminal phase correlation system. This would likely give it a high degree of accuracy with a medium to large nuclear payload.

The primary purpose of this new missile is to extend India’s nuclear deterrent to the PRC. It has a range of 5,000 km (3107 miles), rendering the missile more than capable of reaching its primary target: Peking (Beijing). While not technically an intercontinental ballistic missile, the Angi-3 would certainly be classified as a strategic asset for India.

India’s Defense Minister Pranab Mukherjee announced on June 19 that India would test launch its Agni III missile “as and when required.” The nuclear-capable Agni III has never yet been fired, but tests have been put off since last November. The missile is believed to have a range of about 3,000km. Several days later, defense sources revealed that the missile is scheduled for launch sometime in July. The test should take place in the second week of July, and be launched from the test range in Orissa, east India.

www.newindpress.com...

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Agni 2


Country: India
Class: IRBM
Basing: Railcar mobile
Payload: Single warhead, 1,000 kg
Warhead: 700 kg; Nuclear 0.8, 45, 200 kT, HE, chemical, submunitions
Length: 20.00 m
Diameter: 1.30 m
Launch Weight: 16,000 kg
Propulsion: 2-stage solid
Range: 3,000 km, upgraded - 3,500 km
Status: Operational
In Service: 2001


Details

The Agni-2 is an intermediate-range, railcar mobile, solid and liquid propellant ballistic missile. Developed to counter India’s threats from the PRC and Pakistan, the development of the Agni-2 is believed to have been instigated by advancing Chinese missile designs. The range of the Agni-2 is significantly greater than that needed to strike targets within all of Pakistan and is likely meant as a counter to the PRC. The coupling of inertial guidance with a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system and radar correlation results in a relatively high accuracy at long ranges.

The Agni-2’s range falls short of the primary Indian targets within the PRC, thus the missile is more likely deployed as a tactical asset against the PRC or Pakistan. The missile’s relatively high accuracy, especially at close range, gives the warhead extensive applications against conventional targets, whereas the limited payload makes it a less probable counter value system. There is little value in it as a counter force weapon, as the Pakistani and Chinese missiles are mobile and hidden.

The payload of the Agni-2 is a warhead weighing up to 1,000 kg. The payload section independently maneuvers with four moving control fins during the terminal phase. The Agni-2 is fitted for 0.8 kT, 45 kT or 200 kT yield nuclear warheads, in addition to chemical, high-explosive and submunitions versions. It has a minimum range of 500 km (311 miles) and a maximum range of 3,000 km (1864 miles), with an accuracy of 40 m CEP. It is a two-stage solid propellant design. It is 20.0 m in length with a diameter of 1.3 m in the first stage and 0.9 m in the second stage.

The Agni-2 underwent its first flight test in April 1999 from Wheeler’s Island, near Orissa in the Bay of Bengal. The test was conducted from a railcar launcher and in 2001 there was a launch test from a mobile launch vehicle. There were thought to be less than 5 Agni-2 missiles operationally available in 2001, with a production rate of around 10 missiles per year. There is another long-range version of the Agni-2 that has yet to be flight-tested. It is anticipated that the range of this upgraded version, the Angi-2A missile, will be around 3,500 km (2175 miles).


-----------------------


Agni 1


Country: India
Class: MRBM
Basing: Surface based
Payload: Single warhead, 1,000 kg
Warhead: Nuclear 45 or 200 kT, HE, chemical,
Length: 21.00 m
Diameter: 1.30 m
Launch Weight: 19,000 kg
Propulsion: First-stage solid, second-stage liquid
Range: 2,500 km
Status: Terminated


Details

The Agni-1 is an antiquated medium-range, surface based, liquid propellant ballistic missile. While about five to ten Agni-1 systems are still reported as active, these are considered second-echelon missile systems. As a test in technology, the Agni-1 served as the basis for the more advanced Agni systems: Agni-2, Agni-3 and the Agni-SR. However, in the case of hostile action from both China and Pakistan, the Agni-1 will likely be deployed purely as a stopgap measure.

The Agni-1 is 21.0 m in length, has a diameter of 1.3 m in the first stage, 0.9 m in the second stage, and has a launch weight of 19,000 kg. Its payload is a single warhead, weighing no more than 1,000 kg. The Agni-1 may be fitted with warheads containing 800 kg of cargo, either nuclear (45 or 200 kT), chemical, high-explosive or sub-munitions. The range is 2,500 km (1553 miles) with an accuracy of 100 m CEP, provided by an inertial guidance system coupled to an optical correlation system in the warhead. It uses a two-stage solid/liquid propellant engine.

Under the direction of the Indian Deference Research and Development Organization (DRDO) the development of the Agni-1 began in 1979. The missile uses a first-stage motor like the first-stage, solid rocket motor in the Indian Satellite Launch Vehicle-3. The SLV-3 was based on a US Scout rocket design and has been used in other satellite launches since 1979. The second-stage of the Agni-1 uses the liquid propellant motor system that is used in the Prithvi missile.

The Indian government terminated the Agni-1 program in 1996 and explained that it was not developed for use as a weapon, but rather as a demonstrator of technological capabilities. However, there are about 5 or 10 produced which remain in operational storage, and the Indian government expressed the possibility of the Agni-1 being used as a weapon if there was a threat that required military assets against both Pakistan and China. In 1997, the Agni program began again and it was announced the Agni-2 missile would be launch tested. The new solid propellant missile in the PRC may have instigated restarting the Indian research program.



posted on Feb, 2 2005 @ 02:07 PM
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Yes, IRBM. Typo on my part.



posted on Feb, 2 2005 @ 02:25 PM
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Launch campaign for CARTOSAT-1 going well

CHENNAI, FEB. 1. The launch campaign at Sriharikota for putting into orbit CARTOSAT-1, the only satellite in the world for mapping/creating atlases, is progressing briskly.

India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) will put the satellite in orbit, at a height of 620 km above the earth, in the first week of April

...

P.S. Goel, Director, ISRO Satellite Centre, said: "This is the first time in the world [that] a satellite (CARTOSAT-1) with camera systems for cartography for taking stereoscopic pictures has been built."

The imageries will have a resolution of 2.5 metres and a swath of 30 km.

...

The satellite can cover 30 km everyday. Thus the entire country can be mapped in 100 days. "In a year's time, we can have the map of the whole world. Whatever limitations we had in mapping so far will be addressed by this satellite," Dr. Goel said.

============

The significance of the CARTOSAT, obvious realtime intelligence gathering aside, is that it allows India to develop in one fell swoop a comprehensive digital terrain contour map of the world, something critical for terrain-following cruise missiles and smart bombs. Unlike all the other of India's satelites, CARTOSAT is government, not civilian, operated.



It also carries communication transponders that would help establish communication links during disasters using the HAM radio network.



posted on Feb, 3 2005 @ 02:44 AM
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India has no need for ICBM .

what India needs is food , cloth, and shelter for its masses.


what did alexander,nepoleon, cesear gain from world domination.

Nothing just pain,death and a lousy place in history



posted on Feb, 3 2005 @ 06:47 AM
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I agree, India has no need for ICBMs. What India needs only are IRBMs capable of hitting all of China. That is why India has Agnis, and why Surya will not be soon developed.

People in all countries need food, clothes and ho hum. Even in America, the richest country in the world, there are homeless. I guess ideally America needs to dismantle its military-industrial complex and spend money on that.

India spends among the lowest as a %age of GDP of any major country on defense. Far less than both of its neighbors Pakistan and China who spend anywhere between 8-10%. Far less than both of those neighbors who, in the last 50-odd years, unilaterally attacked India a total of six times in major conflicts, killed over 280,000 Indian civilians; whilst India has never started a war of aggression or for territorial conquest.

The Indian poverty level is decreasing at an average rate of an unheard of 2% per year in the last decade: a whole 213 million people -- nearly the entire population of the United States -- lifted out of poverty, with the rate of decrease increasing in greater margin each passing year.


History has shown that there are countries that have designs on Indian territory and irrational ideological hatered of its very people, neccesitating a credible military deterrance of hostile foreign powers. Indian defense and technological growth is not at the expense of the poor in India, but simply because the poor are getting less poor.

If you are to lecture any country about defense spending, India should be at the very last of the list.

-Raj





[edit on 3-2-2005 by rajkhalsa2004]



posted on Feb, 3 2005 @ 08:16 AM
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Originally posted by rajkhalsa2004
Launch campaign for CARTOSAT-1 going well


India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) will put the satellite in orbit, at a height of 620 km above the earth, in the first week of April


The imageries will have a resolution of 2.5 metres and a swath of 30 km.

...

The satellite can cover 30 km everyday. Thus the entire country can be mapped in 100 days. "In a year's time, we can have the map of the whole world. Whatever limitations we had in mapping so far will be addressed by this satellite," Dr. Goel said.

============

Dr. Goel made a big mistake.
1year=365days=3.65 x 100
1/3.65>1/4
So India counter 1/4 of the total world.
We know the biggest nation Russia take only 1/6 of the total world land.

But it is possible to reach a resolution of 2.5mx2.5m above 620km. Suppose the camera focal length is 1m, then the sensor pitch on CCD we need is 2.5/620000=0.000004m=4um. The best comercial camera Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II sensor size is 24x36/(4992x3328)=5um.
Anyway, in principal only.

[edit on 3-2-2005 by lmairforce]



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 05:41 AM
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Oh drat... that little post about poor, backwards
(
) India by some member was deleted. I was planning to reply to his hissyfit too

Anyway, good on you mods for keeping the place clean


[edit on 4-2-2005 by rajkhalsa2004]



posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 12:31 AM
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Originally posted by rajkhalsa2004
Oh drat... that little post about poor, backwards
(
) India by some member was deleted. I was planning to reply to his hissyfit too

Anyway, good on you mods for keeping the place clean


[edit on 4-2-2005 by rajkhalsa2004]


i u2u'd to a mod called ADVISOR, about the horrible post by phoenix, and he deleted it in a matter a seconds.

[edit on 5-2-2005 by Stealth Spy]



posted on May, 6 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by rajkhalsa2004

India spends among the lowest as a %age of GDP of any major country on defense. Far less than both of its neighbors Pakistan and China who spend anywhere between 8-10%. Far less than both of those neighbors who, in the last 50-odd years, unilaterally attacked India a total of six times in major conflicts, killed over 280,000 Indian civilians; whilst India has never started a war of aggression or for territorial conquest.



what the hell is the 8-10% from even at the highest estimate china spends 3.5-5.0% mid-range 4.3 of the GDP and that is $67.49 billion. while offically spends 20 something billion. that means if you take the offical estimate china spends less of their military than india. pakistans is only 4.9%



posted on May, 6 2005 @ 08:38 PM
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8-10%, biggest BS I've heard in some time. At 10% we'd be spending a crap load more than the 50-60 Bil US estimates now.

How come China's GDP varies by each source I go to? CIA world fact book states 7.262 Trillion dollars.
www.odci.gov...

Some say 1.65 Trillion
www.pwcglobal.com...

Others say 5.6 trillion

Anyone care to explain why and which one is the real number? I've never learned about our real GDP in China.

[edit on 6-5-2005 by COWlan]



posted on May, 6 2005 @ 11:50 PM
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It also carries communication transponders that would help establish communication links during disasters using the HAM radio network.


ham trasponder carry by another miniture stal. not by cartoset as you mention.
carry by same vehicle



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 04:18 AM
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Originally posted by COWlan
8-10%, biggest BS I've heard in some time. At 10% we'd be spending a crap load more than the 50-60 Bil US estimates now.

How come China's GDP varies by each source I go to? CIA world fact book states 7.262 Trillion dollars.
www.odci.gov...

Some say 1.65 Trillion
www.pwcglobal.com...

Others say 5.6 trillion

Anyone care to explain why and which one is the real number? I've never learned about our real GDP in China.

[edit on 6-5-2005 by COWlan]


theres different types of GDP theres real GDP and theres PPP. real GDP is what a country can buy in forigen currency and PPP is what someone can buy in there own country. becuase things in there home country is cheaper they have more to spend.

takes my take on it. dont balme me if im wrong

i think the 5.6 is outdated



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 05:24 AM
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Originally posted by COWlan
8-10%, biggest BS I've heard in some time. At 10% we'd be spending a crap load more than the 50-60 Bil US estimates now.

How come China's GDP varies by each source I go to? CIA world fact book states 7.262 Trillion dollars.
www.odci.gov...

Some say 1.65 Trillion
www.pwcglobal.com...

Others say 5.6 trillion

Anyone care to explain why and which one is the real number? I've never learned about our real GDP in China.

[edit on 6-5-2005 by COWlan]


CIA just updated it's factbook this month... these are the latest figures.

You were reffering to old data... and since then China's economy has grown



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 11:45 AM
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how many time i remind you that poster should start there discussion according to topic .

there is no conetion between GDP and ICBM and if you want discuss something do it about ICBM Vs ICBM SURYA Vs DF.

remeaber guy this topic is not about economy discussion

[edit on 7-5-2005 by mirza2003]



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 12:12 PM
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Stealth Spy, what is your source for this information, especially the test launch of this ICBM?



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 08:48 PM
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india got a lot of help from the russians designing their ICBM





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