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What Exactly Are People Marching for When They March for Science?

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posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee
www.nwhm.org...

You know, I've said more than once that Trump is not entirely a bad thing. Well, actually he is, but at least he's gotten more people to pay more attention to what's going on.
edit on 3/8/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee
www.nwhm.org...

You know, I've said more than once that Trump is not entirely a bad thing. Well, actually he is, but at least he's gotten more people to pay more attention to what's going on.

I had to grab that into a quote before you went back and edited it lol.
Yes, it's an awakening of sorts.
I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?
I wish that Kerry and Clinton hadn't killed the nuclear research industry, we could be much further along the path of intrinsically safe nuclear reactors. I know, the byproducts.... But until something else comes along, i don't see renewables doing it without a substantial increase in the cost of energy.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:02 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee




I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?

As long as oil is so cheap? Not in the near term. What's your point?
Price is the only factor to be considered? Costs do not only involve prices.

edit on 3/8/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee




I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?

As long as oil is so cheap? No.
What's your point?

Put the price of energy up in this country and energy intensive industry no longer becomes profitable and flees to other countries, along with the jobs.
Not good for the economy, people gotta eat.
C02 is like airborne fertilizer, it's not all bad.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee




Put the price of energy up in this country and energy intensive industry no longer becomes profitable and flees to other countries, along with the jobs.

There will always be a demand for energy.



C02 is like airborne fertilizer, it's not all bad.
No. But it's certainly not all good.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

whilst walking atleast a few will question what they are doing and why this is the start of science



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: daniel2sxc

LoL



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:48 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee
www.nwhm.org...

You know, I've said more than once that Trump is not entirely a bad thing. Well, actually he is, but at least he's gotten more people to pay more attention to what's going on.

I had to grab that into a quote before you went back and edited it lol.
Yes, it's an awakening of sorts.
I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?


Not without some additional research and developments.

... you know: science.

That stuff.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:51 AM
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originally posted by: daniel2sxc
a reply to: Byrd

whilst walking atleast a few will question what they are doing and why this is the start of science


No, they already know why they're there.

And yes, they'll be asking questions but not the kind you're thinking of. Things like crowd density, energy flow, crowd composition, sociology, psychology, crowd patterns, traffic flow, internet connections, crowd composition (gender, race, economic status, etc)... and a million other questions.

I tell kids that science is like "CSI: Earth" - there is something to learn about everything and once we know what is currently known about something, we can think of a lot more questions to ask.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:53 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee
www.nwhm.org...

You know, I've said more than once that Trump is not entirely a bad thing. Well, actually he is, but at least he's gotten more people to pay more attention to what's going on.

I had to grab that into a quote before you went back and edited it lol.
Yes, it's an awakening of sorts.
I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?


Not without some additional research and developments.

... you know: science.

That stuff.

New Manhattan Project, Goal? Nuclear Fusion power generation for the masses.
edit on 8-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 01:56 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

Improving the
level of scientific knowledge is the rising tide that raises all the ships in the country. We cannot go back to "Mom and Pop" stores and Soda jerks a la happy days! We do not need big strong men to lay track! We do not need hordes of blacksmiths and wheel rights. In short manual labour is a declining requirement for the USA and we have overproduced labourers.

If we are going to progress into a high tech and innovative economy we are going to need to develop and maintain how based talents. There are many morons passing gas about "people coming over here taking our jobs". Yet they do not seem to realise that one driver for immigration is the chronic shortage of homegrown science talent..
How many senators have science degree? In the UK only about 4 Members of Parliament out of 650 have science degrees. in 2015 only 2 congressmen had science degrees. How can that be right.

Dear Sir/Madam

I really do not care who you voted for but I must say that I salute your post totally.


I am so very excited abut this.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 02:01 AM
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There is a maths educator called John Allen Paulos (Temple University) who despairs of the level of maths knowledge I this country. According to him over 50% of US Phds awarded for numerate science go to people who were not born in the USA. Now if these people get snapped up to work in the US by science-based businesses who is at fault?



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 02:33 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

tru



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 02:45 AM
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originally posted by: Tiger5
There is a maths educator called John Allen Paulos (Temple University) who despairs of the level of maths knowledge I this country. According to him over 50% of US Phds awarded for numerate science go to people who were not born in the USA. Now if these people get snapped up to work in the US by science-based businesses who is at fault?


I've read his books - quite an interesting and entertaining man. Love the Innumeracy (and its followup), and "I Think Before I Laugh"



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

Get yourself a good sign to carry around, check these out lol.

www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 04:34 AM
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I just think it's funny that most of the people in the science march are liberal arts students.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: Konduit




I just think it's funny that most of the people in the science march are liberal arts students.

Citation required.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 07:51 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: MysticPearl



Professor Jim Gates, former adviser to Barack Obama, told journalists that the march appeared to lack an end goal – a prerequisite for political action – and would simply be perceived as “science against Trump”. “At least as far as I can detect, there is no theory of action behind this,” he said. “This bothers me tremendously. “To have science represented as this political force I think is just extraordinarily dangerous.”


judithcurry.com...

J. Curry couldn't quite make sense of it either, so I'm not alone.
If people are going to politicize science, then the scientists need to fight back.



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee




I'd like to ask you, do you see any energy alternatives on the horizon that don't involve substantial rises in the cost of energy?

As long as oil is so cheap? No.
What's your point?

Put the price of energy up in this country and energy intensive industry no longer becomes profitable and flees to other countries, along with the jobs.
Not good for the economy, people gotta eat.



Just imagine if the US was completely energy independent where we didn't need to import oil or find new sources of oil. We have plenty of resources that are self replenishing. Wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, there are some fields researching tidal energy.
I admit that many of those are costly at start up, but think about how much it costs the US to deploy our military to the regions we keep importing our energy sources from.
I bet if you look at the costs factoring in those things you would find it is much cheaper to produce and harvest our energy here.
edit on 8-3-2017 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
Just imagine if the US was completely energy independent where we didn't need to import oil or find new sources of oil. We have plenty of resources that are self replenishing. Wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, there are some fields researching tidal energy.
I admit that many of those are costly at start up, but think about how much it costs the US to deploy our military to the regions we keep importing our energy sources from.
I bet if you look at the costs factoring in those things you would find it is much cheaper to produce and harvest our energy here.


If we gave Americans first dibs on buying any energy product we produce, the US is already energy independent. For as much flack as Obama got for being anti drilling, under his administration we increased oil production significantly. The US produces almost as much oil as Saudi Arabia, and we actually export more than we import.

As far as energy goes, the US is in a fantastic position right now. Like always, there's areas we could improve like expanding geothermal and nuclear while opening up more offshore drilling, but we have the capability right now to be fully energy independent if we were to withdraw from the world market and only sell domestically. The thing is though, there's diplomatic reasons to not do that. For example, we're in something of a trade war with Russia right now in supplying Europe with energy especially during winter. Whoever wins that, gets immense leverage in getting Europe to go along with the victors geopolitical goals.

Personally, I think the solution is an all of the above approach (with the possible exception of expanding coal). If it makes energy build it, mine it, or tap it. The more we have, the better off we are.



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