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Artificial Earthquakes: Oklahoma’s Risk “Now Equal to That of San Francisco”

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posted on Mar, 6 2017 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed


The ground water gee i wonder where it came from

The water is clean when extracted and poisonous when it is returned....pretty simple stuff

I think you are speaking to the fracking fluids, which was not the intent of my question as it is not the majority of the fluids that are disposed of.
Where does the produced water associated with petroleum production come from? You know, the waste water that is being referred to in the articles, the cause of the quakes.

You are obviously not talking about the produced water, as that is not clean when extracted.
edit on 6-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



My issue with fracking is it is unsustainable and destructive, we both know the politics of money re more important than doing the job properly .
It's just another method of enhanced oil recovery. As far as the job being done properly, the regulatory body has oversight, if it's not done to standards, there will be consequences.
edit on 6-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 6 2017 @ 11:42 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee




It's just another method of enhanced oil recovery. As far as the job being done properly, the regulatory body has oversight, if it's not done to standards, there will be consequences.




Like there was consequences for the bp disaster ? (which i realize is not a fracking incident, but that is beside the point)

The oversight on these practices are pathetic and in need of overhaul. Fining a business for poor environmental practice is part of the problem, like it is cheaper to dump rubbish and pay the fine than it is to dispose of the rubbish safely.



posted on Mar, 7 2017 @ 12:01 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: D8Tee




It's just another method of enhanced oil recovery. As far as the job being done properly, the regulatory body has oversight, if it's not done to standards, there will be consequences.




Like there was consequences for the bp disaster ? (which i realize is not a fracking incident, but that is beside the point)

The oversight on these practices are pathetic and in need of overhaul. Fining a business for poor environmental practice is part of the problem, like it is cheaper to dump rubbish and pay the fine than it is to dispose of the rubbish safely.

I'm in agreement with you here in a general way, however, i'm not familiar with the way the regulatory body in Oklahoma works, so can't speak to them specifically.
The BP disaster wouldn't have happened in certain other jurisdictions like Canada, Norway or Brazil.

You never answered my question with regards to the produced water associated with petroleum production.
edit on 7-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2017 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee



You never answered my question with regards to the produced water associated with petroleum production.



AS far as i know they use wells, or rivers, groundwater, they sometimes have to truck it in, and no i am not talking about the produced water. I have never really looked into what they do with the produced water, i bet it ends up back in the river.


A 2011 EPA report estimated that 70 to 140 billion gallons of water are used to fracture 35,000 wells in the United States each year - approximately the annual water consumption of 40 to 80 cities each with a population of 50,000, according to Earthworks. Fracture treatments in coalbed methane wells use from 50,000 to 350,000 gallons of water per well, while deeper horizontal shale wells can use anywhere from 2 to 10 million gallons of water to fracture a single well.

source



posted on Mar, 7 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

The produced water that is mentioned in the articles is brought up along with the oil and separated out. It is then disposed of deep within the earth in geological zones that have no communication with freshwater. Fracking isn't even the focus of the earthquake swarms, it's the disposal of the produced water. What you might not realize is that for every barrel of oil produced, there is an associated amount of water that comes up as well. In some wells, it could be as much as 10 barrels of produced water to every barrel of oil.


approximately the annual water consumption of 40 to 80 cities each with a population of 50,000

Move the decimal points around and it don't look so bad.
Approximately the annual water consumption of 0.4 to 0.8 cities with a population of 5,000,000.




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