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Incredible sharp and clear image taken of Saturns Moon Mimas by NASA - Feb 1, 2017

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posted on Mar, 8 2017 @ 08:46 PM
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That is certainly a well-battered little sponge cake. Even if I had no idea of it's orbit, I would guess it to be near the main body of the debris cloud/ring system.
Thank you. That's a great image.




posted on Mar, 9 2017 @ 05:57 PM
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Looks like CGI to me.... Just saying



posted on Mar, 9 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: hutch622




First thing i thought of was golf ball before they became cut proof


Same here - those craters look mighty deep if its diameter is 396 kms



posted on Mar, 9 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: carewemust




If true, shouldn't the "clump" that coalesced into the Saturn and it's moons, be made of the same material..thereby causing all the moons to look nearly the same?


shhh...don't speak too loud, nothing to see here.

saturndeathcult.com...

I rewatched Interstellar again the other night. Funny how they said in the movie that a wormhole appeared near Saturn to enable wormhole travel to save the Earth



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 03:40 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: hutch622




First thing i thought of was golf ball before they became cut proof


Same here - those craters look mighty deep if its diameter is 396 kms

That would be because Mimas is mostly ice rather than rock. Impacts in ice are deeper and sharper than in rock.



posted on Mar, 10 2017 @ 04:06 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

carewemust,

By the logic you are using to query the construction of Saturn's moons, their variety and disposition, one would assume that all the worlds orbiting our Sun ought to be made of largely the same things, and look relatively similar. This is, of course, flawed thinking.

Saturn and Jupiter have large gravity wells, larger than any body in the solar system other than the Sun itself. This means that their moons behaviour relative to them, is more similar to that of planets around a star, than it is to that of a mere moon around a planet.

Those moons formed out of what was left over from the formation of the planet itself, and in similar ways to the way that planets formed around the sun. The gravity well of the planet captured the chemicals of which those moons are made, and because those chemicals have different mass and weight and so on, they coalesced at different distances from the parent planet. Jupiter and Saturn are like microcosms of a solar system, having as they do complex systems of orbiting moons in their own right. When spacecraft pass through or close by Jupiter's gravity well, those craft are considered not to simply be visiting Jupiter, but to be visiting the Jovian system, for precisely this reason. You could say the same of Saturn without being in error.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 05:28 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

thanks



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:01 AM
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Another version of the true-colour image I posted earlier:



You can tell that it's ice surface, not rock.



posted on Mar, 14 2017 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Indeed.

That glare from the crater edges in the top left quadrant of the image is clearly a reflection from ice, as opposed to some sort of metallic substance.



posted on Mar, 15 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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Turns out, those are Cassini's last closeup images of Mimas! All future observations of Mimas will be from more than twice this distance... So it's time to say Goodbye, Mimas, and thanks for all the Star Wars jokes.


Here's one of those latest shots, enhanced to better show the night side, lit by santurnshine: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...




posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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I did a little image enhancement to see what details I could bring out:




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