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Will you get 5 volts if you give 5v to a 220to5v charger?

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posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:27 PM
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Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.
edit on 3-3-2017 by belkide because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: belkide

I am not sure what you are asking. You want to use a 5v charger to charge up a 220v battery bank?



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:37 PM
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No.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: belkide

I think it will just say its charging forever and never really be charged. And the off-chance one of those one in a million shorts that spark a dry static fire near gas fumes or something kinda final destinationish. Give it a go and let us know.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: belkide

NO just NO please do not start cutting leads and attempting to make things



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: belkide
Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.


Quit.

QUIT.

Before you burn your house down.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: belkide

What exactly do you have and what are you trying to accomplish?



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:14 PM
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a reply to: belkide

You CAN NOT CHARGE A BATTERY DIRECTLY WITH AC VOLTAGE!!!

Chargers that plug into a wall have a converter built into them to convert AC to DC.

If you attempt to apply 220 VAC directly into a 5 VDC battery, you run the risk of it rupturing, exploding or catching fire!

Do NOT DO THIS.




posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:23 PM
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I think the OP wants to use it backwards.

NO!

It will not work.

Take heed of the above comments. Electricity can and will kill you. It also does not care one bit if you die.

P



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: belkide
Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.


Agreeing with IgnoranceIsntBlisss...NO!



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:33 PM
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originally posted by: belkide
Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.


If you put 5v AC into a charger designed to take 220 and step it down and rectify it to 5v DC, at best you will get the proportional voltage which is about 0.11v DC. If you put 5v DC into the charger it will warm up the transformer depending on the resistance of the primary windings. Likely, not much will happen but if you do try it, do it outside.

If you are thinking that you can run it backwards and get 220v out, that won't happen. To step it up to 220v, you need to at least make pulsed DC so the transformer will work; you need a changing field. Old car radios had an electromechanical device to do so. You would also have to bypass the rectifier bridge.

If you have 5v DC already, why would you run it through the charger and not use it directly?
edit on 3/3/2017 by pteridine because: clarification



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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I think the OP's question has been misunderstood. I think he's saying that he has a torch with a rechargeable 5v battery, charged from a standard 220v power supply; can it be modified to charge other 5v batteries?

I may be wrong!


edit on 3-3-2017 by MarsIsRed because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: belkide
Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.


Yes.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: belkide
You didn't describe clearly what you want to do but it doesn't matter that much. If you know what you're doing you can adapt some equipment to work on other devices, but if you don't know what you're doing, you can end up burning your house down in an attempt to do so. Seriously. Fires can and do start this way.

The fact you have to ask is a clear sign you don't know what you're doing, but you have to worry about amps in addition to volts. A flashlight doesn't use many amps, but if you hook a flashlight charger up to another device like laptop that uses much more amps than flashlight, wires can overheat and there's your fire and there goes your house.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 12:40 AM
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Think of electricity as water.
This is no good for advanced users, but it's a decent starting place.

Volts is speed.
Amps is volume.

A pressure washer is fairly low volume at very high speed- and a cheap one will cut your flesh.
A good hydrojet can precision cut steel.

220v is a lot of voltage- if you're unfamiliar, avoid anything over 24v until you've read some books on it.
Also, 220 is most likely AC, where 5v is almost certainly DC. Mixing them up is the difference between an electric chair (suicide) and a nice kettle of tea.

Treat the power grid with respect. If you must tinker, use batteries as a power source.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 03:18 AM
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And thus, Frankenstien's monster was never built



My old dad blew a 1.5v rechargeable battery once, giving it 12v dc, for a mere few seconds, it'd work most of the time to give it a little more juice when needed on the fly.. now we have too many flies and no 1.5v batteries.

He was no Tesla, I agree...



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 08:23 AM
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I cut a new 9 volt battery apart to get the individual AAA cells out due to need and I accidentally shorted out one of the cells with the leads that connect them before I separated them. It blew up in my hand.
Even batteries can be dangerous.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: belkide
Hello ATS

The reason I ask this question is to charge something with 5volts given to 220v leads of the charer which has a 5v battery in it. it is a DIY powerbank from a flashlight which can be charged connecting to the wall socket.

Cheers

P.S. I dont have any deep experience with electricity and I have to cut some cables to try this so it seemed reasonable to ask this on ATS before acting.
NO...It's a reducing transformer...Whatever voltage goes in will be reduced coming out at the same ratio as the 220v to 5v...For example: if you put 110 volts in it should come out as 2.5 volts...



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 09:07 PM
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I am building a time machine so this is very important. lol no just kidding.

I wanted to learn if you give 5 v to the charger's 220v leads would you still get 5v from the usb end. I was just curious and lazy to test it. I think it is less likely to kill you than getting drown eating a cereal.

So it turns AC 220 to 5v DC right? Think like this, maybe the bosses inside the charger will say nothing to the 5v DC enters inside from the 220v side and walkthru like nothing happened and keep walking

edit on 4-3-2017 by belkide because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: Iscool

Thanks that was the answer I was looking for. I think I was not clear enough to many while asking it as English is not my native language. I take the whole responsibility for the different answers and the time spent while writting and posting them plus the fee of the electricty your device spent. I can pay it with (5x5)/220 volts constant current



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