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Lithium-Ion Battery Inventor Introduces New Technology for Fast-Charging, Noncombustible Batteries

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posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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AUSTIN, Texas — A team of engineers led by 94-year-old John Goodenough, professor in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and co-inventor of the lithium-ion battery, has developed the first all-solid-state battery cells that could lead to safer, faster-charging, longer-lasting rechargeable batteries for handheld mobile devices, electric cars and stationary energy storage.


It is safer than the current volatile lithium-ion batteries we see all to often catching fire due to extreme thermal runaway (i.e. exploding).


Today’s lithium-ion batteries use liquid electrolytes to transport the lithium ions between the anode (the negative side of the battery) and the cathode (the positive side of the battery). If a battery cell is charged too quickly, it can cause dendrites or “metal whiskers” to form and cross through the liquid electrolytes, causing a short circuit that can lead to explosions and fires. Instead of liquid electrolytes, the researchers rely on glass electrolytes that enable the use of an alkali-metal anode without the formation of dendrites.


And, its operating temperature is also a big positive (pun intended) to this new tech.


Additionally, because the solid-glass electrolytes can operate, or have high conductivity, at -20 degrees Celsius, this type of battery in a car could perform well in subzero degree weather. This is the first all-solid-state battery cell that can operate under 60 degree Celsius.


If this can be economically feasible to produce in large numbers and at low cost, it does have a chance to change the energy industry. However, that fact might just be its own downfall if the oil barons get their talons into this tech....especially considering the state in which it was invented. I anticipate it will either be suppressed or take 20 years to come to market (too late and will intentionally flop).

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posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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Great post, however I have to disagree with your assessment on the oil barrons. At the time of our height, we were unmatched in many fields. With the rise of other countries, we have to consider the fact that if we don't push and innovate, someone else will.

Social media has helped with the spread of new ideas and technology. In this day and age, suppression is no longer feasible.

I forsee a new high tech renaissance in our future.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 01:04 PM
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Oops. Looks like an expensive refit.

www.tesla.com/en_GB/gigafactory



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

First solid state battery with a reasonable temperature range? It seems to me that barium titanate on a semiconductor substrate can provide more than 1000 times the energy using 100 nm etched substrate with a temperature range of better than -60c to +150c. I really don't know why this kind of technology isn't being promoted, unless it's because it's orders of magnitude better than anything commercially available, at more than 1000 joules per cc. To matters even more commercially viable, charge rates are less than 1 minute per 100 joules, charges like a capacitor and with output current limiting discharges like a battery. Go figure, I guess the PTB aren't ready to let us peons have affordable power until they milk oil and coal dry.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 01:32 PM
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With at least three times as much energy density as today’s lithium-ion batteries it might be nail in coffin for lithium batteries in not too distant future.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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originally posted by: KrakatoaI anticipate it will either be suppressed or take 20 years to come to market (too late and will intentionally flop).


Companies like Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Tesla etc. whose product lines are driven directly by battery technology have a far bigger stake in this than "big oil".



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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thanks for positive news. nice break from the Trump bashing.

I have a couple quadcopters and would l-o-v-e better batteries.

has anyone tried a lithium-ion car battery instead of the traditional lead-acid I wonder?



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle

Think about it.

The first light globes were ultra efficient. When it was realised that it would impact on profits, they were created to have a limited life span. Made to blow after a certain time. This was an arranged agreement with many manufacturers at the time, and put in practice purposely. Now, the logic must be, instead of making things ultra efficient, make them purposely redundant after time, always keeping the bleeding edge held back.

No one will ever produce a thing designed to be the best it can be, if they plan on marketing it.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 08:26 PM
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The engine Bay of a car is not the place I'd want a lithium they are very sensitive to over charge and under charge something led acid battery's take well



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: ElGoobero

I don't know about for a regular gas engine setup, but I'd imagine they're less ideal for the usage.

I do believe the new light weight compact backup power/jump starters are lithium ion though.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: ElGoobero
thanks for positive news. nice break from the Trump bashing.

I have a couple quadcopters and would l-o-v-e better batteries.

has anyone tried a lithium-ion car battery instead of the traditional lead-acid I wonder?


the lithium- car battery is not the same as the lithium-ion batteries used in cell phones.

lithium-ion car batteries are Lithium iron phosphate,LiFePO 4 and differant then the ones used in small electronics.
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...




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