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Whirlwinds on Mars

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posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 08:47 PM
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The atmosphere of Mars is 1/100th of Earths. Would there be enough atmosphere to lift dust into the air?
There should be a way to calculate the lifting capacity of the atmosphere there, knowing it's 1/100th of earths and composed almost entirely of C02.
Maybe the Mars rover isn't on Mars...




posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Don't forget the less than half of earths gravity part of your equation.



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

All that carbonation - its like fizzy lifting drink!



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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Well that was to be expected with the low depression from the south mixing with a high from the east.

Tomorrow's forecast: Sunny with a slight chance of meteor showers

Nice find S+F




posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 04:03 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Dust storms on Mars have been recorded for ages. They pick up so much dust, that they can cover areas the size of entire continents at once, so yes, there is enough atmosphere to lift the dust on the Martian surface.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 04:23 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

You do realise that dust storms have been observed on Mars since 1909, right?



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Yes, understood. However, The question I have and I think the OP has is, should a dust devil (whirlwind) on Mars behave the exact same way it would on earth, Considering the difrence in atmosphere and gravity.

Not trying to say their is a Mars hoax, honest question wanting to learn.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: Observationalist

Been digging around a bit.


“If I were standing on Mars, a 100-mile-per-hour wind is going to exert the same effect on me as about an 11-mph wind on Earth,” Dave Lavery from NASA’s Solar System Exploration program told Popular Science. According to the Beaufort Wind Force Scale, that’s a gentle breeze.

Because the atmosphere is so much thinner, the amount of energy in its winds is much lower. The energy is determined by how much air there is, and how fast it’s moving. Or in other words, momentum = mass times velocity. Assuming velocity is constant, having fewer molecules in the air lowers its mass, which brings down its momentum.

As a result of its thin atmosphere, winds on Mars carry about one-tenth of the energy of those on on Earth.


www.popsci.com...



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Actually the mean average atmospheric pressure on Mars is about 0.6% of Earth's.

But, that's more than enough for a gases to pick up the dust located there either with wind or a dust devil.

600 pascals is more than enough to do that. Carbon Dioxide is actually more dense than either Nitrogen or Oxygen.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Nice, I'm curios at how it forms a vortex and what's propelling it. Found this describing a Gravetational Aether?
Martian Dust Devils

The Martian Dust Devil gives us insight into how the Gravitational Aether manifests itself. Because Mars does not have a planetary magnetic field, the Gravitational Aether is totally responsible for the dust devil’s vortex action. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the Gravitational Aether is, in fact, electromagnetic in nature

I doubt this is the official explanation, but interesting theory. Electric Universe?

The Dust Devil remains electrostatically attached to the surface and moves along in the gentle Martian breeze encountering different surface materials with different densities along the way which cause it to vary in intensity. The Dust Devil travels along until the column cools and the electrostatic charge dissipates.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

I bet flying a kite is out?
Must have to use very large parachutes?



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: D8Tee

Dust storms on Mars have been recorded for ages. They pick up so much dust, that they can cover areas the size of entire continents at once, so yes, there is enough atmosphere to lift the dust on the Martian surface.



It helps that the dust is like talcum powder.

No sandstorms on mars and no pushing rockets over.




posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Big kite, very thin and light weight materials. It would still work if the wind was gusting enough.

Like the information you looked up: 11 Mph may not sound like a lot, but get a hand full of baby powder or talcum powder in your hand and step outside when there is a breeze of 11 Mph, or gently blow on it, and watch what that powder does. Just keep in mind it's going to get messy.

Keep in mind that while 600 pascals doesn't sound like a lot, the martian dust also does not mass very much either. Doesn't take much to move it around.

Parachutes will work to a point, but most landers will still require a rocket to actually land, or in Curiosity's case: the use of the sky hook landing method.
edit on 3/3/2017 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Appreciate your input, I have a better understanding of this subject now.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: Observationalist



Found this describing a Gravetational Aether?


Utter nonsense. The vortex forms by the same process they form on Earth; a combination of conservation of angular momentum and rising air. Rising air (caused by convection) causes a region of low pressure. Surrounding air is drawn to the low pressure area. Any movement that air had before it starts being pulled in is translated into rotational motion around the core of the dust devil as it is carried upward. The faster it is drawn in, the faster the rotation. Nothing to do with electrostatic charging, magnetism, or gravitational aether (whatever the hell that's supposed to be). It's driven by solar power. Heat.

Mundane sounding but still very cool. I like to run into the middle of dust devils when I'm on the ground. While hang gliding good thermals can be found above them. Bad idea to fly into the dust devil itself though. Really turbulent. And dusty.
edit on 3/4/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: Observationalist

Well, they probably appear very similar, because a vortex looks an awful lot like a vortex, no matter the circumstances which give rise to it.

Also, its all very well saying that they look similar, but all we have to go on is a GIF image or two, which really does not cut the mustard. What we need is footage showing the rotation of the whirlwind at actual speed, high frames per second count, so that we can examine the way it moves, both across the terrain and in terms of its rotation.



Its worth pointing out that tornadoes of fire have been witnessed on the Sun as well. High gravity, low gravity, it makes little difference. Vortexes are incredible and occur in liquids and gases with a fair degree of regularity. No doubt, what with the lightweight soil of Mars, they are a common occurrence on the surface there.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit




Vortexes

Vortices.


Too pedantic?



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 03:38 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

The sands of Mars are constantly shifting , study of dunes on Mars shows this.

Here's another little Devil going about its business.





posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 04:02 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Not at all.

I checked, and apparently either is acceptable, although I do prefer your choice.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Latin is cool.
So are vortices.

edit on 3/4/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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