It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Man-made earthquakes will continue to shake the country

page: 2
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 04:38 PM
link   
a reply to: D8Tee

No problem. Excuse me very much for being sick, tired - and put off by all the vicious anger and hostility here.

I did an 'ed. to add' after I saw your edit, btw, and thanked you for clarifying.






posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 04:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: D8Tee

No problem. Excuse me very much for being sick, tired - and put off by all the vicious anger and hostility here.

I did an 'ed. to add' after I saw your edit, btw, and thanked you for clarifying.



I would be willing to guess that the regulatory body in Oklahoma may leave something to be desired. If companies are not paying heed to known fault zones and downhole pressures, something bad could happen. If Oklahoma is not following the NRC's list of best practices, thats a HUGE issue that needs to be corrected.
There are safe zones that can be used to dispose of produced water, if it costs more to truck the fluid there, the companies will usually not opt for the safe option unless they are forced by regulatory bodies to do so.


The National Research Council‘s list of best practices for drillers and disposal well operators includes investigating any potential disposal site’s history of earthquakes and its proximity to fault lines. Some states, like Ohio, have done just that, and are forbidding any deep injection wells near fault lines.

edit on 4-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 08:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: dreamingawake

What caused the 1882 and 1952 quakes?

Those weren't "man made" What's the point here?

Do you disagree with the USGS article shared about the concern?



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 08:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: dreamingawake

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: dreamingawake

What caused the 1882 and 1952 quakes?

Those weren't "man made" What's the point here?

Do you disagree with the USGS article shared about the concern?


I don't know how industry is regulated down there. If they are not following NRC's list of best practices then I am concerned. How would I know what zones they are disposing into and what measures are being taken to ensure produced water disposal doesn't end up causing issues. The potential is there for it to happen. In a well regulated industry, the risks are minimal.
edit on 4-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 10:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: dreamingawake

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: dreamingawake

What caused the 1882 and 1952 quakes?

Those weren't "man made" What's the point here?

Do you disagree with the USGS article shared about the concern?


I don't know how industry is regulated down there. If they are not following NRC's list of best practices then I am concerned. How would I know what zones they are disposing into and what measures are being taken to ensure produced water disposal doesn't end up causing issues. The potential is there for it to happen. In a well regulated industry, the risks are minimal.

As it should be regulated to stop such things.

From articles it seems it's not regulated properly.



posted on Mar, 4 2017 @ 10:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: dreamingawake

originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: dreamingawake

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: dreamingawake

What caused the 1882 and 1952 quakes?

Those weren't "man made" What's the point here?

Do you disagree with the USGS article shared about the concern?


I don't know how industry is regulated down there. If they are not following NRC's list of best practices then I am concerned. How would I know what zones they are disposing into and what measures are being taken to ensure produced water disposal doesn't end up causing issues. The potential is there for it to happen. In a well regulated industry, the risks are minimal.

As it should be regulated to stop such things.

From articles it seems it's not regulated properly.


Public pressure will get them working on this, also, the possibility of a big earthquake being pinned upon them likely scares the industry enough to actually do something in this case.
It's no where near where I live, so I'm unsure of many of the variables at play here.
Seems there are steps being taken.
It'll be costly, but the industry will look at it as a cost of doing business.
I still think downhole produced water disposal done right is the answer, but if that turns out not to be the case there are other more expensive options available.

www.linkedin.com...


edit on 4-3-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2017 @ 08:46 AM
link   
a reply to: D8Tee




It'll be costly, but the industry will look at it as a cost of doing business.





Industry does everything it can to avoid every little "cost of doing business" they can dodge. In any way they can.



posted on Mar, 5 2017 @ 03:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: D8Tee




It'll be costly, but the industry will look at it as a cost of doing business.





Industry does everything it can to avoid every little "cost of doing business" they can dodge. In any way they can.



Everyone knows that.
It's the reason the regulatory body has to have unlimited authority and rules with teeth, like the ability to shut a company down. Monetary penalties don't work in this day and age when billions are the new millions. The companies need to fear the regulatory body.



posted on Mar, 11 2017 @ 09:10 AM
link   
a reply to: dreamingawake

My understanding is that New Madrid is always a little shaky but it is a "stable" shaky. I worry more about areas like sinkholes and caves that may develop cracks from the vibrations.
I live near the infamous "salt domes", huge underground caves that hold a lot of natural gas in storage. They are covered by a basalt top layer. Imagining those suckers going up...



new topics

top topics



 
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join