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The star that created our world.

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posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

The most likely suspect is the black hole at the center of our galaxy.




posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

You mean john cena



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 12:23 AM
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originally posted by: Aeshma
a reply to: rickymouse

You mean john cena


Because you can't see it....



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

The stars (or star) that birthed the elements from which the solar system is built are long dead in supernovae.

The process of nucleosynthesis within those stars means that they didn't have the same chemical abundances, either.

The supernovae that blew those stars apart, spreading their elements also created most of those new elements.

Not only that but our galaxy is in rotation and has interacted with nearby galaxies, so even the identification of where those stars might once have been is unclear.

edit on 2/3/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 12:56 AM
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I'm sticking with the JHVH-1 farted in the bathtub theory.
It's easier for me to wrap my brain around.



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 05:33 AM
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The Sun is probably a 2nd or 3rd generation star owing to its relatively high metallically compared to the stars around it. It points at the stellar nursery that the sun formed out of being long since dissipated. The orbit of the sun, while does bob up and down isn't very extreme and the sun is probably a disc star rather than one in a disc crossing globular cluster for example.

The Stellar remnant for the original star? well depends upon the mechanism causing the supernovae, not all stellar expositions result in a black hole/white dwarf or neutron star. There might be nothing left... but our sun and other stars that formed in its wake



posted on Mar, 2 2017 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: CreationBro

I was being facetious.



posted on Mar, 3 2017 @ 04:59 AM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

What you are looking for is at least 5 billion years in the past and long gone.

Like someone else suggested stellar drift is a factor, and i imagine the orbital mechanisms of other stars may also play a part.

Short of developing some form of time travel to directly observe the phenomenon i don't really expect there to be any meaningful answer to your query given the technology we have available to address the question.




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