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The star that created our world.

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posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:23 PM
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I was wondering if it was possible from analyzing various heavy elements on earth and our solar system and also the amount of hydrogen, helium etc.. in our sun and gas giants to make an estimate of what the original star was like.

When I say original I mean the one that provided all the material for our system to form.

Could the explosion of that star still be visible or it was too close to our current location in the galaxy.




posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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You have to account for close to 5 billion years of stellar drift.

It is most likely that the stellar nursery that gave birth to our sun(and likely others) has long dissipated.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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It probably was like Arnold Schwarzenegger.

edit on 1-3-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

But if the closest star from us is 4 light years away is it not more likely that thebsolar system is the total agglomeration of the original supernova. Meaning it did not form other stars since we have no close relative star neighbours.

edit on 102017Wednesdaypm331Wed, 01 Mar 2017 22:35:40 -0600America/Chicagov35 by Golantrevize because: (no reason given)


Edit: lol nvm just googled on nebulae and found that some are 20+ light years across...damn!
edit on 102017Wednesdaypm331Wed, 01 Mar 2017 22:41:38 -0600America/Chicagov41 by Golantrevize because: (no reason given)
means by my deductions that starrs are doomed to get smaller and smaller amd that the first ones mustve been of monstrous size.
edit on 102017Wednesdaypm331Wed, 01 Mar 2017 22:43:14 -0600America/Chicagov43 by Golantrevize because: (no reason given)

edit on 102017Wednesdaypm331Wed, 01 Mar 2017 22:43:42 -0600America/Chicagov43 by Golantrevize because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

A very good answer, if we knew the composition of the local group and could use orbital projection's to try to identify which star's probably started together then maybe we would have a good idea of the composition - at the end of it's life cycle that is - of the super massive star that probably did exist and created that nebula.

I suspect that there are a lot of astronomers whom wish that they had sufficient data to make that projection or at least an educated guess, the original star's mass however would be far harder to estimate as you say since the bulk of it's remains' have probably long since dispersed or been coalesced into new body's.

Of course as computer model's get ever more proficient and as we gain every more data we will at least one day be able to track most of those visible (surviving) star's that originated in the same place and are about the same age back to a common origin area in space, this in itself if we then gain a rough estimate by there mass and relative age and make up and so therefore be able to make an even closer guess as to the size and density of the nebula and therefore perhaps even find the core of that star one day if it still exist's out there somewhere, possible as a pulsar or a neutron star.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

It may be a collusion of many stars.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

Also consider the theory that our solar system and local group may have been introduced into the milky way relatively recently.

I believe the theory hinges on the orientation of the ecliptic plane to that of the milky way disc, as well as how our solar system dips in and out of the galactic disc in a sine wave fashion.

Theorists suggest that this indicates that our solar system and quite possibly the local group may have been an outlier to the milky way, possibly a small star cluster or cloud like the large and small magellenic clouds.

As to the origin of these small clusters and clouds that are on the outskirts of galaxies, up to speculation.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767

Pulsar, neutron star Or perhaps even as a blackhole. Imagine the star that created us ending up swallowing us! How shakespearean



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: CreationBro

Very interseting thank you for pointing that out



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

I remember reading an article on this a few years ago.

The short answer is: No.

In fact, they think our sun was part of a open cluster of stars, but each have moved so far over the last 5 billion years that it's impossible to tell which (as an example, most of the stars in the Big Dipper are part of the same open cluster, but are moving away from each other).

Our sun makes a trip around the center of the galaxy once every 250 million years or so. That means it's been around the galaxy's center at least 20 times now. Makes it a lot harder to figure out where everything was in the galaxy that long ago as everything else has also been moving around and not all at the same speed or direction.

It is a interesting thing to wonder and think about though.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

If you can remember where you read that article I would love to check that out.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

I think it was this one:

news.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

I did some further thinking and kind of had a wild idea.

We know the galaxy has a dark matter/energy halo.

We used to think black holes absorbed everything passed the event horizon. Recent research has shown that there is actualy a plume of xrays and gamma rays (e.m.) above and below the supermassive blackhole at the center thus implying that highly energetic e.m. can escape the black hole.


svs.gsfc.nasa.gov...



So we have an hourglass of xrays and gamma rays off the center.


Now trip on this.

Imagine if that energetic e.m. "rains" back down around the edges of the galaxy where the dark matter halo resides, in a torus shape at the edge.

Could high frequency e.m. have some type of interaction with dark matter/energy and produce these clouds on the outskirts of the galaxy, essentially creating a recycling effect?

Who knows.




edit on 1-3-2017 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Thanks just read it.

Im mind blown by this: "Just examining the bobbing motion of the sun and the star cluster would have been enough, since stars ejected from clusters tend to continue moving with the same amplitude as their birthplaces."

Also :"Practically all of our galaxy's 200 to 400 billion stars, including the sun, were born through the gravitational collapse of diffuse clouds of dust and gas sprinkled across the Milky Way by previous generations of long-dead stars."

What other ways could a star be born?



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

I've done all the calculations, permutations and such. All answers point to.....


....Chuck Norris.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: CreationBro

Im seeing clearly what you mean. Like a fountain expulsing everything back to the edge of the galaxy. This would mean that stars are younger near the edge than going near the center. Is it the case?



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

All it takes is an large amount of hydrogen (and when I say large, I mean astronomical amounts).

A few atoms of it clump together.....this attracts more,,,,,then more......and even more, and it keeps going until at some point it reaches critical mass and you end up with a fusion reaction.

What helps is when you have some event near by that can push it along a bit: a super nova exploding, the pressure waves help push the hydrogen together.
A star passing by: it's gravity pulling on they hydrogen, causing it to clump together.

It's a process that takes a lot of time though, hundreds of thousands to millions of years.

Size of the star will depend upon how much of that hydrogen is available, and how dense that amount is. Super giant stars tend to form because there was a lot of hydrogen available that was dense enough to be collected fast enough by the star forming.

Small stars, like red dwarfs formed because there was not as much stellar hydrogen for them to form from, but there was enough to start fusion up enough.

It's a pretty interesting field and there are tons of books and docus on the subject.



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

Not sure if theres a general trend regarding the age of stars with regard to the distance from the center ill look into it, but i did find this:

astronomynow.com...

www.jpl.nasa.gov...

New stars forming on the edge that perplex scientists.

I found this too:


The mechanism is dark matter self-annihilation, resulting in the creation of decay products of ordinary matter andgamma rays (highly energetic photons). ... The leading dark mattercandidate is some sort of WIMP (weakly interacting massive particle). WIMPs interact only via gravity and perhaps the weak nuclear force.


darkmatterdarkenergy.com...



edit on 1-3-2017 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)

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posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:56 PM
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It's now a dwarf and is oft mistaken for a planet . . . Jupiter!



posted on Mar, 1 2017 @ 11:59 PM
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a reply to: JDeLattre89

Youre suggesting Jupiter is the remnant of a supernova?

Thatd be hard to believe! Unless its core is a non feeding black hole and its disguised as a planet lol. Unlikely though.
edit on 2-3-2017 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



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