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I was diagnosed with DSPD

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posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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In Australia the whole sleep disorder study racket is run by companies that sell cpap machines,I was diagnosed with apnea bought the machine and now I can lie in bed and stare at the ceiling all night with absolutely no apnea nor sleep either.Western medicine is clueless in this area Im afraid to say.




posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: khnum
In Australia the whole sleep disorder study racket is run by companies that sell cpap machines,I was diagnosed with apnea bought the machine and now I can lie in bed and stare at the ceiling all night with absolutely no apnea nor sleep either.Western medicine is clueless in this area Im afraid to say.

To me it did kind of seem like just a classification of something that naturally happens, not really a "disorder" in the literal sense of the word. Most of the treatments for it don't even have a 50% success rate. I've been used to it for so long I passed on the light therapy goggles. I figured I'll just keep living with it and take what sleep I can get.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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I alternate between gravol pills and melatonin. That way I don't build up a tolerance to the gravol. The melatonin, I have 1.5 mg, and 5 mg.
Seems to help.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

I have improved my sleeping pattern since I started working from home I now operate about an hour before sunrise about 4.00 am to and hour after sunset about 7 pm I think this is a much more natural rythym now I don't sleep deeply but I get enough rest whereas I used to not sleep at all I think sleep patterns take quite some time to turn around.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:59 PM
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I go to sleep around 9 or 10 pm, awake between 2:30 and 3 am every morning. Fully rested. I work construction,high in the air and good at it.

I do have weird dreams, so maybe just afraid to sleep???



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

I used to think I had insomnia too, I had horrible sleeping patterns and it took a huge toll on me.

Once I changed my diet to a healthy one and worked out on a consistent basis, my sleeping pattern changed dramatically and I've become an early bird.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
I alternate between gravol pills and melatonin. That way I don't build up a tolerance to the gravol. The melatonin, I have 1.5 mg, and 5 mg.
Seems to help.

What are the gravol pills? I've tried melatonin but it doesn't really help with falling asleep or staying asleep, it only gives me insanely vivid dreams.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: jaynkeel
I self medicate with a couple of beers every night. Seems to be enough to slow my body down to a point where i can usually go to bed by midnight, now waking in the am... different story.
Not real sustainable long term. Because of a tolerance buildup for most people, 2 drinks becomes 3 and then 4... For the average person anyway.
My best advice would be a sustainable unwinding routine involving calming herbal drinks, low lighting, low stimulation, low stress etc. Soothing sounds and/or meditation could help. Seems an effective treatment could be far different from one person to the next. Best of luck finding yours, and do share what works.
edit on 23-2-2017 by Illumimasontruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

They're a motion sickness pill. Good for any nausea, and the side effect is drowsiness 👍🏻



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:44 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks


Bad part is there is nothing you can do about it. Light therapy and dark therapy are two non-medication style treatments, but even those don't work in 50% of people who try them. Also Modafinil, but that also has only shown limited success in people with this disorder. I'm just wondering, does anyone else have this and if so, what are the things that work for you? I'm lucky to have a job right now where I can work out of my home and sleep and wake up when I feel like it, but for years it was a living hell having to conform to normal waking hours.




I haven't been officially diagnosed. I am narcoleptic though, diagnosed twice. I have suspected I am a delayed-phase sleeper though. It has been hell and got me a lot of detentions and talkings-to from supervisors for showing up late to skool/ werk etc.

Stay away from modafinil. If it doesn't make you feel like sheet, you'll develop a resistance to it after a few months anyway. Useless pseudo-amphetamines yuck!

Light therapy is not something most people have commitment for. You could try the whole sleep mask, flood light stuff, but meh, your body won't be totally fooled long-term.

There isn't really any advice for some sleep disorders. Just live on your own time and own schedule and cherish it as long as you can. Try to avoid 9-5 desk jobs and the like where arriving on the dot is more important than actual production.

The world won't really understand your sleep disorder; they will always look at you as lazy and unmotivated. Just ignore it and carry on best you can.

Good luck!




edit on 23-2-2017 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks

originally posted by: snowspirit
I alternate between gravol pills and melatonin. That way I don't build up a tolerance to the gravol. The melatonin, I have 1.5 mg, and 5 mg.
Seems to help.

What are the gravol pills? I've tried melatonin but it doesn't really help with falling asleep or staying asleep, it only gives me insanely vivid dreams.


Here's the thing...falling asleep earlier and waking up earlier generally doesn't fix the problem. Your body is still like "Whoa, this is the wrong time for us to be asleep/ awake."

WHEN you sleep is actually more important than HOW MUCH you sleep. Everyone has a sweet spot where they'll get the most restful sleep. For people with delayed-phase sleep hours, that sweet spot is just at a different time than others.


edit on 23-2-2017 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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originally posted by: bluesjr
a reply to: underwerks

"People with DSPD generally fall asleep some hours after midnight and have difficulty waking up in the morning."

Guess I have it too. I don't have any tips, other than no caffeine after noon. But I also enjoy what seems like my only free and quiet time once the family is asleep. Just hate the waking up part.


This reminds me of myself, no late coffees, and love the calmness that is (usually) around when everyone´s sleeping.

Much love!



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 08:12 PM
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Almost sounds like mania to me. I have it. I have seen times where I didn't sleep for two or three days.... Is your mind real active?



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 09:34 PM
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Suggestions that I found helpful that you may be willing to consider:
Try to eat a light meal around 6pm. Ease up on the carbs. Don't eat anything after 8pm. Have green/relaxing herbal tea only after 6pm if you need a hot drink. Avoid alcohol.
Have a plant growing in your room.
Darken your room at night (until you can't see your hand in front of your face).
Minimise blue lights/screens after 10pm.
White noise - either a fan or mini indoor water feature.

Hope that some of these (or all) suggestions work for you and you get a more restful sleep.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Have you considered a heavier exercise routine, if you do at all?

Not trying to "put you on the spot" in anyway, but I have had similar problems and I find that my sleep patterns are affected by how much exercise I have.

The more I exercise, the better I sleep.

If you do not easily fall asleep and get a full nights rest, you either have to take meds to do it for you, get drunk and pass out, or wear yourself out with some running, weights...whatever.

Edit:

Don't worry about getting a full 8 hours sleep, as they recommend. Some of us work on only a few. Find what works for you.
edit on 23-2-2017 by introvert because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-2-2017 by introvert because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks
After years of having what I thought was insomnia, I decided to actually go see a doctor about it. I'll admit, I was mainly hoping to get some kind of prescription. But it turns out it isn't insomnia, it's DSPD. Which basically means your circadian rhythm is longer than the normal 24 hour circadian rhythm most people have. It may not be insomnia, but it sucks just as bad. Kind of like an eternal jet lag.


Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), also known as delayed sleep phase syndrome or delayed sleep phase type, and in the 2014 revision of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder, is a chronic dysregulation of a person's circadian rhythm (biological clock), compared to the general population and relative to societal norms. The disorder affects the timing of sleep, peak period of alertness, the core body temperature rhythm, and hormonal and other daily cycles. People with DSPD generally fall asleep some hours after midnight and have difficulty waking up in the morning.[1] People with DSPD probably have a circadian period significantly longer than 24 hours.[2] Depending on the severity, the symptoms can be managed to a greater or lesser degree, but no cure is known.

en.wikipedia.org...

Bad part is there is nothing you can do about it. Light therapy and dark therapy are two non-medication style treatments, but even those don't work in 50% of people who try them. Also Modafinil, but that also has only shown limited success in people with this disorder. I'm just wondering, does anyone else have this and if so, what are the things that work for you? I'm lucky to have a job right now where I can work out of my home and sleep and wake up when I feel like it, but for years it was a living hell having to conform to normal waking hours.

Any advice or tips? If you have insomnia I'd like to hear of anything that worked for you as well. Thanks.


I'm not diagnosed, but I'm pretty sure I have the same/similar problem.

Seriously though, watch this video, it might have some useful info.


I think a balanced diet, rich in micronutrients, regulated on a strict TIME RESTRICTED schedule has helped me significantly with pretty much everything, including sleep. Maybe it can help you too.

The circadian rhythm is something that you don't want to screw up. It regulates so many systems in our bodies.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Not the place to get very good advice.

Some things to consider. Turn your cell phone off and keep it in another room. Turn off any WIFI devices you have entirely, as it NOT ON AT ALL. Work to align your head North as possible. Do not watch TV two hours prior to sleep. Get a blue light filter if you use the computer. Melatonin can help, but only in liquid form, with no additives. Start with a small drop, sometimes less is more. To bed the same time every night, but if you are really struggling, get out of bed if the issue seems to create stress. Try to stay in one position, tossing and turning restarts the cycle, you need to be motionless for some time before sleep, so avoid tossing if urged. Check to see if you are close to powerlines, power boxes and the neighbors wifi etc. It is likely you are wildly sensitive to EMFs. I've seen folks struggle and they ended up having their head right next to a power box.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

I have a blind friend and asked how he knows when to go to sleep. He says he is messed up all the time... Very hard for him



posted on Feb, 24 2017 @ 01:31 PM
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I have had DSPD since 2002 when i was hit by two rare autoimmune disorders.

For the first 14 months it was 70+ hours without sleep then crash for 12+ hours and start again for another 70 plus hours.
Now i am down to 30+ hours awake with 70+ hours awake once in a while.

The really strange part is even being awake for 70+ hours i never felt sleepy.

The VA tried antidepressants to help me sleep and that only made the problem worse.



posted on Feb, 24 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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Lots of good and helpful suggestions, thanks to all for those.

Here are a few more.


Lavender - The Sweet Scent of Sleep
Whiff lavender for a more restful slumber

Researchers found that lavender increased slow-wave sleep, the very deep slumber in which the heartbeat slows and muscles relax. During this phase, the brain is thought to organize memory, as well.

Use Pure lavender essential oil. Sprinkle a few drops on a piece of tissue and tuck it under your pillow, or use an aromatherapy diffuser.

www.prevention.com...


You could also try making a pillow stuffed with dried lavender flowers. This will occasionally need refreshing with some of the oil or replacing the stuffing with freshly dried flowers.


Valerian

Scientists aren't sure how valerian works, but they believe it increases the amount of a chemical called gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA helps regulate nerve cells and has a calming effect on anxiety. Drugs such as alprazolam (Xanax) and diazepam (Valium) also work by increasing the amount of GABA in the brain. Researchers think valerian may have a similar, but weaker effect.

umm.edu...


Effects can be seen within the first 2 weeks but Valerian works best after being taken for 28 days.

Replace ordinary or herbal tea with Red Bush - natural tea and completely caffeine free.

Yogic/mindful breathing. Be aware of your breath, your lungs and diaphragm. Inhale slowly through your nose for a count of 10, then exhale slowly through the mouth for a count of 10, then relax with no breathing for 10 and repeat as you will.

And music, ideally at 60-80 beats a minute for an hour or so before you intend going to bed, will also help to relax heart rate and prepare mind and body for sleep.



Anyone got any ideas about how to improve at the other end of sleep? For me, sleep means going into catatonic state for 3 to 14 hours. Whole other story at the waking end, complete zombie for about an hour before even considering myself human again.




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