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Bottlenose Dolphins of the Black Sea

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posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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How is it that the bottlenose dolphin came to be and still are living in this isolated habitat of the Black Sea?

There are three dolphin species currently living in the Black Sea but I'm really focused on the bottlenose.

Bottlenose dolphins are notoriously smart and have a larger brain capacity then humans.

I did some quick searches but couldn't really find any real information on this divergence.



My quick search yielded zip. What gives?

Blue = bottlenose habitat


edit on 22-2-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-2-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-2-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:29 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman




How is it that the bottlenose dolphin came to be and still are living in this isolated habitat of the Black Sea?


The Black sea has a connection to the Sea of Marmara and it has a connection to the Aegean Sea. With water ways connecting them that are nearly a mile wide it isn't surprising.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:29 PM
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Pretty cool huh?

Mediterranean connection during the Holocene

The Bosphorus, taken from the International Space Station Map of the Dardanelles The Black Sea is connected to the World Ocean by a chain of two shallow straits, the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus. The Dardanelles is 55 m (180 ft) deep and the Bosphorus is as shallow as 36 m (118 ft). By comparison, at the height of the last ice age, sea levels were more than 100 m (330 ft) lower than they are now.


wiki
edit on 22-2-2017 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:33 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Gotcha. I actually learned about them being there from a Bulgarian friend who back in the 90's was served bottlenose dolphin from a family friend because they had limited access to meat. Communism.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

So why only dolphins and not seals?



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 12:59 AM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
a reply to: dreamingawake

So why only dolphins and not seals?




Critically endangered Mediterranean monk seals were historically abundant in Black Sea, and are regarded to have become extinct from the basin since in 1997.[40] Monk seals were present at the Snake Island until 1950s, and several locations such as the Danube plavni nature reserve and Doğankent were last of hauling-out sites in post-1990.[41] Very few animals still thrive in the Sea of Marmara.[42]

Various species of pinnipeds, sea otter, and beluga whales[43][44] were introduced into Black Sea by mankind and later escaped either by accidental or purported causes. Of these, grey seal[45] and beluga whales[43] have been recorded with successful, long-term occurrences.

Black Sea - Wiki

Sadly, looks like the Munk Seal is on the brink of extinction elsewhere.


Distribution and Numbers The Mediterranean monk seal is the most endangered pinniped species worldwide and is currently on the brink of extinction. Although formerly found all over the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and northwest African coast, the species' numbers have now been reduced to perhaps less than 600. Whereas the former distribution was continuous throughout its range, the present distribution is discontinuous, with probably little exhange between the separated populations (Johnson et al., 2006). The remaining seals are found in remote and undisturbed areas around the north-east Mediterranean Sea (Greece and Turkey) and northwest African coast (Mauritania), with a few individuals along the Mediterranean coast of Morocco and the Portuguese Desertas Islands of Madeira (Johnson et al., 2006).




Status
For centuries Mediterranean monk seals have been killed by fishermen who see the seals as competitors or accuse them of destroying their fishing gear. In the past the seals were also killed by those who believed that sealskin and seal parts were able to provide protection from a variety of medical problems.


Source
edit on 23-2-2017 by dreamingawake because: link issue



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

I know it's been answered but seals are a much easier target for exploitation.

Mammals of the sea are special in that they can access any body of water they have access to, if there is a way they can be found there. Where I live in the UK it isn't unheard of for dolphins and seals to be found up to a mile up river.

Of course it isn't just direct human exploitation. The fact that Europe destroyed many of it's forests and thus creating much dirtier rivers has had an effect over the last 1000 years or so.

The redirecting and damming of rivers had a huge effect too since this too also drastically affected migratory species of fish. Ultimately hunters of the sea and rivers had less and less reason to hunt these locations, they are just not the grand bonanza they once were.

Plus 500 years ago these hunters were probably being viewed as a very reasonable alternative food source since the rivers began to be practically dead by then...

3000 years ago you'd have found mammals that hunt and live in the water pretty much anywhere they could access.

Humans really can be a disease and we have been for a while. Sad but true.




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