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My Foray into Woodworking (or how did I fall into this hole? )

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posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 05:53 PM
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Long story short, many many rears ago, my dad received a carving set (you know...for meat...). This set in particular:

thumbs2.picclick.com...

Well a few weeks ago he hands the set off to me, and suggests that I build a box for it.
I have never done this before. Sure, I've made boxes-mostly planter type boxes out of 2x4s and whatnot with nails and screws-but never something like this.
The local big box home improvement store was having a sale, so I bought a table saw

and OMG I think I've found my calling!!!
This thing scares the bejeezus outta me, but I love it! After watching about a bazillion videos on how to use it, I made this:



Again, this is the first time I've done anything like this. Please don't judge the marks where the stain didn't cover the glue...I didn't realize that would happen.

Any woodworkers here that might offer tips and/or tricks? After watching all those videos, I wanna make sleds and jigs and use them to make things!
My next project will be to create a box for the whetstone that my dad gave me as well. The original box that it was in has Box Joints instead of just 45 degree corners. Before that, I need to create a Box Joint jig to use.




posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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Make your width cuts on the tablesaw 1/16' wider so that you can planer your cut edges, at least the ones that will be showing.
Wipe glue with a wet rag as soon as possible then sand when dry so you don't get the glue splotches showing where the wood stain should have absorbed into the wood.
Also invest in an orbital palm sander so you can sand all surfaces before staining.
On soft woods such as pine, use a stain pre conditioner when using a dark stain so the colors come out more evenly.

Otherwise nice job for your first try.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

Mate, for a first attempt that's not bad.

Looking at the picture my first comment would be to get a different blade for the table saw. You're using a ripping blade, get yourself a GP blade with 48 teeth. You could go finer with a 60 tooth cross cut, but that wont work real well on really hard wood.

As for the gluing you've pretty much got 3 choices.

1. Be very careful with the application.
2. If you get runs or squeeze out let dry completely then break out a sharp chisel and a bit of 240grit
3. If you get runs or squeeze out absolutely saturate it with water. This generally only works with hardwood as it is considerably less porous.

ETA. One thing I forgot to mention. If you find you're getting breakout at the ends of the stock when you make your cuts, put some sticky tape over the cut line. This will save a truck load of sanding when you're finishing.

ATS woodbutchers, we drop 'em and chop 'em.
edit on 22 2 2017 by myselfaswell because: extra bonus tip.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

I would recomend studying the use of hand tools and jointery. There are many styles. Try them all.

Don't waste money on big expensive tools. Learn to use hand tools for as many things as possible.

Sanding, sanding, more sanding. It will become a time for meditation. Keep a wide array of grits around.

Buy an assortment of saws and chisels. And the proper tools to sharpen them.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

What Woodcarver said.



Sanding, sanding, more sanding. It will become a time for meditation. Keep a wide array of grits around.


Sanding is a bit like walking up a hill with countless false tops. You do eventually get there and meditation will be your friend.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

My grandfather was a skilled carpenter, but he died before I was born. I had one carpentry class in middle-school and really enjoyed it. I never really got into carpentry until I owned our first home. As a young married couple, you try to save as much money as you can, so you try doing a lot of things yourself. I started buying carpentry tools, and before you know it I built a 1,300 sq. ft addition on our home! My wife wonders sometimes if I got the carpentry bug from my grandfather genes. lol.

Here's a secret that will surprise you if you haven't realized it already. YouTube is a Treasure trove for "do it yourselfers!" If you ever want to build or repair something, they have videos that show you step-by-step on how to do it. YouTube has probably saved me hundreds of dollars of repairs over the years! You can find out how to build almost anything on YouTube. One book on carpentry and access to YouTube was all I needed.

One thing about carpentry, you end up having a lot of pride in your work when you've finished a project. I can tell by your post, you know what I'm talking about.




posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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A good quality hand plane will do away with most of your sanding. A Stanley #4 is pretty much the only one you'll ever need. All the others are nice to have, but if you can only afford one, get the #4. I have that and a couple of Japanese planes and almost never use sandpaper. Learn to hand sharpen planes and chisels. There are a ton of gadgets out there, but after you get some experience, they're just that...gadgets.
You want to watch a Master woodworker, check out Paul Sellers. He's the only person in 70 years, to be asked to design pieces of furniture for the permanent collection in the White House.




posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 07:19 PM
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DAVID64 is right, learn your planers. Once you can use and sharpen a plane correctly, you will be able to make see through ribbons of wood. I live off wood, 22 years as a carpenter, build stick frame homes when asked, but mostly log cabins from timber I harvest. A lot of BS advice can steer you wrong, and mess with your confidence. Learn your basics, learn your hand tools and how/why they work. Building furniture is much different than framing, and totally different from trim carpentry. It's a wonderful thing to work with your hands to create things you want or need. If your in America, I would recommend watching the woodsmith program on pbs. It's 15 minutes of pure carpentry, and you can learn a lot. Also, if you ever head to northwest wisconsin, let me know, I have plenty of things you might be interested in seeing/trying.
Good luck, and enjoy.

P.s. 22 years and I still have 10 fingers. Make sure you do the same.
edit on 2222017 by Natas0114 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

I am somewhat a beginner woodworker too. I would suggest a power planer, I love mine, it was not too expensive, and besides letting get wood to the thickness I need, it almost does all the heavy sanding for me. Also a decent set of clamps can be bought from H. Freight for alot less than anywhere else.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: edaced4

I know enough to be dangerous.

I think you have soft wood there. Stain is difficult on soft wood, I believe there is a wood conditioner or treatment to make the stain uniform.

But you know how you get better? Doing exactly what you are-keep it up.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:14 PM
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originally posted by: myselfaswell
a reply to: edaced4

What Woodcarver said.



Sanding, sanding, more sanding. It will become a time for meditation. Keep a wide array of grits around.


Sanding is a bit like walking up a hill with countless false tops. You do eventually get there and meditation will be your friend.


Funny this. I spent what I thought was an eternity sanding down the edges. Was more like 20 minutes
And thought I was happy with it.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: edaced4

My grandfather was a skilled carpenter, but he died before I was born. I had one carpentry class in middle-school and really enjoyed it. I never really got into carpentry until I owned our first home. As a young married couple, you try to save as much money as you can, so you try doing a lot of things yourself. I started buying carpentry tools, and before you know it I built a 1,300 sq. ft addition on our home! My wife wonders sometimes if I got the carpentry bug from my grandfather genes. lol.

Here's a secret that will surprise you if you haven't realized it already. YouTube is a Treasure trove for "do it yourselfers!" If you ever want to build or repair something, they have videos that show you step-by-step on how to do it. YouTube has probably saved me hundreds of dollars of repairs over the years! You can find out how to build almost anything on YouTube. One book on carpentry and access to YouTube was all I needed.

One thing about carpentry, you end up having a lot of pride in your work when you've finished a project. I can tell by your post, you know what I'm talking about.



I emphasized that part there...Before I took this pic, that particularly visible "45 degree" angle was my biggest gripe. I'm not happy with that one little thing...but I did this!



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:59 PM
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I wanna try!! Great post S&F, I'm buying a Stanley #4 tomorrow as mentioned



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 12:14 AM
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im awestruck by your woodworking. My stuff looks like Picasso designed it for the Beetlejuice set. And i've had a ton of exposure to woodworking throughout my life. I can make just about anything I need to make, and it'll be highly functional. And asymmetrical. And ugly.

"Clap trap" is a word that comes to mind.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 03:46 AM
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originally posted by: edaced4
Well a few weeks ago he hands the set off to me, and suggests that I build a box for it.

Read! I can give tips, like wiping off the excess glue with a wet rag so the stain will take.
There are a million little tips (I was a cabinetmaker many years ago, in Chicago), the best thing is to read!
And DO!
Get Fine Woodworking magazine.
Read tips, there are millions of internet pages of tips.
Start easy.
Progress slowly.
Learn steadily.
There are many techniques to learn.

And when you learn that working with some exotic hardwoods give off toxic gas, or toxic dust.... WEAR SAFETY EQUIPMENT!
The fellow who taught me didn't believe in that stuff.
Te taught me to weld without a mask!
No respirators...
Dog knows how I lived this long, but...
Most all 'accidents' happen to the novice or the experienced woodworker!
Everyone in between knows to respect the tools and safety rules!
Only the ignorant novice and the arrogant take-it-for-granted 'expert'!

Very nice start, by the way!
Enjoy!


edit on 23-2-2017 by namelesss because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: edaced4




The original box that it was in has Box Joints instead of just 45 degree corners. Before that, I need to create a Box Joint jig to use.


Box joints are ok, they'll hold just fine for just about anything you want to make and they can add details to an otherwise plain box, but.... Don't depend on jigs. Learn to cut joints by hand. Especially dovetails. You'll thank yourself later. There's a lot of satisfaction in doing it all by hand. I build furniture and use mortise and tenon and dowel pins [ and a bit of Titebond 2 ] , instead of nails or screws, along with quite a bit of carving, so if you need help on anything, gimme a holler.



posted on Feb, 24 2017 @ 02:11 AM
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For those of you still watching...the semi-finished project:



I'm going to cover that styrofoam insert with probably black felt or something like that...
And just for more clarity...


It's not perfect, but dammit! I made it!

Many thanks for all replies, tips and tricks. As far as jigs vs doing it by hand...I honestly don't think I have that much patience...

Thoughts?




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