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Samsung warns customers not to discuss personal information in front of smart TVs

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posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Ahhh. the greatness of technology. My computer and monitor do not have cameras or microphones attached and not even a speaker. I do have speakers but they get turned off with my big toe.

I am smarter than the TV. Our cell phone is very old, not a smart phone or I phone or anything like that. The only thing that might be a security issue is the Kindle. You do have to make sure to hang up the land line cordless phone properly, it doesn't disconnect, and the other person can't call out. My daughter had a hard time getting me to hang it up one day, she started pressing keys to make noises so she could call out.


Turning off the amplifier that feeds a speaker does not really affect the ability to use the speaker as a microphone. In fact, the feedback loop around the amplifying components (used to keep the signal from runaway) would probably mask the microphone effects when the amplifier circuit is active.




posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: chr0naut

If it's Google tech then part of what it does is auto transcribes the voice to text. Makes for tiny files.


If it's Nuance, they have been in the voice recognition business for many years. They're the folks that developed Dragon Naturally speaking and now have a boatload of commercial VR products.

Not surprised Samsung partnered with them - especially since Google is a competitor in the mobile phone space...



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: rickymouse
Ahhh. the greatness of technology. My computer and monitor do not have cameras or microphones attached and not even a speaker. I do have speakers but they get turned off with my big toe.

I am smarter than the TV. Our cell phone is very old, not a smart phone or I phone or anything like that. The only thing that might be a security issue is the Kindle. You do have to make sure to hang up the land line cordless phone properly, it doesn't disconnect, and the other person can't call out. My daughter had a hard time getting me to hang it up one day, she started pressing keys to make noises so she could call out.


Turning off the amplifier that feeds a speaker does not really affect the ability to use the speaker as a microphone. In fact, the feedback loop around the amplifying components (used to keep the signal from runaway) would probably mask the microphone effects when the amplifier circuit is active.


Oh oh, I guess I really do not need the speaker.

Someone may hear my cat scratching it and whining because I don't bring her a treat. I will have animal rights activists protesting my house because I do not feed the cat every twenty minutes like she wants me to.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
And you would think the Man would step in and protect us, not build server farms in Utah.

We need an electronic privacy act yesterday.



I think it already exists Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA).

What we really need is for bodies (like the EFF and ACLU) to actively seek to prosecute infringers, no matter if they are government or corporate or private individuals.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Inc_9x
Oh yeah sure, that'll be easy Samsung - never talk in front of anything that's connected to the Internet.

I agree... Ssshhh, big brother is listening thru your devices.

Nothing so crazy as listening to what my family says. They interrupt and talk over each other at length, you can't make out a word. But go ahead and be driven crazy by it, better you than me.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:57 PM
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if youre on the right radar you can be listened in on by your blender too.

stuff like this is almost enough to make a guy a lil paranoid



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
I also wonder at the data security of the data stream itself?

Is the audio sent unencrypted and can it be easily intercepted?

What is the legality of actively capturing conversation where parties may be unaware that it is happening?
Depends on the state.

In New York I know that it's illegal to record someone without permission, if in a non public location such as a home.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:37 PM
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I remember being paranoid about this a while ago. Funny thing is when you bring it to peoples attention, they would give you the you're crazy look. Meh...oh well. I'm sure they have a lot on me already.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

I agree. I've talked to a couple lawyers on this concept who deal with this area of law. I don't think either lawyer I talked to was interested enough to run with it, but they agree that it's something we need to address. Basically, we need some sort of legal framework to figure out who owns data when it leaves a person, or is read from a person. If I knew more about the law, or could find a good lawyer to work with, this is definitely an area I would put personal time into.

The status of data in courts is very ambiguous, I was actually sitting through a lecture on data security today, which concluded with the point (after 2 hours of supporting evidence), that every one of us is committing multiple felonies a day through harvesting data not intended for us. Which isn't too different from a point I've made here several times in the past, that everyone with a cell phone is technically a felon if the laws were enforced as written.

Data, who owns it, and what you permit others to do with it all need to be addressed in courts.

My personal view, is that your data is your data. A device may (with your consent) process that data, but they cannot store/duplicate it. To me that would be an ideal world... but such a world also eliminates many technologies currently in use so it's a complicated issue.

Back to these TV's, it's absolutely a breach of privacy for them to spy on you.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Ahhh. the greatness of technology. My computer and monitor do not have cameras or microphones attached and not even a speaker. I do have speakers but they get turned off with my big toe.

I am smarter than the TV. Our cell phone is very old, not a smart phone or I phone or anything like that. The only thing that might be a security issue is the Kindle. You do have to make sure to hang up the land line cordless phone properly, it doesn't disconnect, and the other person can't call out. My daughter had a hard time getting me to hang it up one day, she started pressing keys to make noises so she could call out.


I bought a tablet to replace my ailing netbook recently. There's things about it I like, and things I don't like. One thing I've made peace with though is the camera. I take pride in being one of those ungoogable people in real life, and part of that involves no pictures of me. I enabled the front camera for a feature that doesn't dim/turn off the screen if it detects my face looking at it. I'm sure it's also taking my picture and sending it back wirelessly, but as long as those pictures don't become public, I don't really think I care.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:12 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: rickymouse
Ahhh. the greatness of technology. My computer and monitor do not have cameras or microphones attached and not even a speaker. I do have speakers but they get turned off with my big toe.

I am smarter than the TV. Our cell phone is very old, not a smart phone or I phone or anything like that. The only thing that might be a security issue is the Kindle. You do have to make sure to hang up the land line cordless phone properly, it doesn't disconnect, and the other person can't call out. My daughter had a hard time getting me to hang it up one day, she started pressing keys to make noises so she could call out.


I bought a tablet to replace my ailing netbook recently. There's things about it I like, and things I don't like. One thing I've made peace with though is the camera. I take pride in being one of those ungoogable people in real life, and part of that involves no pictures of me. I enabled the front camera for a feature that doesn't dim/turn off the screen if it detects my face looking at it. I'm sure it's also taking my picture and sending it back wirelessly, but as long as those pictures don't become public, I don't really think I care.


Put a sticker on it!!!!

I used to be a bit paranoid, now I dont care. The spouse has a pretty hefty security clearance and Im sure there is some monitoring. They made us get smart phones when I was perfectly fine with the dumb phone. I dont talk much. Anyway, I say if youre brave enough to be a fly on my wall.... damn youre good and prob need a raise.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:18 PM
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Nobody spies on anyone. Everyone is just trying to protect you.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: makemap
Nobody spies on anyone. Everyone is just trying to protect you.


In reality it's true that no one really wants to listen to your private conversations, "spy" on you, where's the profit in that?

But how much would it be worth to a company to learn what you are thinking of buying in the future, what colors you like and what stores you shop in and why? The data obtained by listening is worth a fortune in targeted advertising!

And if it's worth that much $$$, legal or not, agreement or not, they will listen and sell what they hear.
edit on 22-2-2017 by NickK3 because: puntuation



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Mandroid7
And you would think the Man would step in and protect us, not build server farms in Utah.

We need an electronic privacy act yesterday.



I think it already exists Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA).

What we really need is for bodies (like the EFF and ACLU) to actively seek to prosecute infringers, no matter if they are government or corporate or private individuals.



I don't think there is anything to prosecute for now.

The ECPA has been rendered toothless by introducing the "Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act" (CALEA) in 1994, the "USA PATRIOT Act" in 2001, the "USA PATRIOT" reauthorization acts in 2006, and the "FISA Amendments Act" of 2008.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 09:12 PM
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I've never seen a lot of gain for connecting my TV to the net. Pretty much all it buys me is the dubious ability to choose video feeds from my phone, something I don't do anyway. So the TV is never hooked up.

If there's something I wouldn't want, don't trust and wouldn't use, it's Google Cast.

I do use a streaming device, it's got no camera or mic. If you're really worried about such things, you could monitor the IP addresses it connects to, I suppose.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

I had the warning on our newest TV on the problem of data sharing, so when the TV was first turned on is ask if we wanted to share information and we just turned off that capability.

Is interesting that at least the TV warned us about the sharing of information.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: Slanter

Unless you have unsecured internet around you, the smart TV can not connect to the internet without a WEP KEY. So you could have the store connect it to the internet so the TV gets updated software, Take it home plug it in, and do not connect it to the internet, which should be secured.



posted on Feb, 23 2017 @ 10:41 AM
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originally posted by: kurthall
a reply to: Slanter

Unless you have unsecured internet around you, the smart TV can not connect to the internet without a WEP KEY. So you could have the store connect it to the internet so the TV gets updated software, Take it home plug it in, and do not connect it to the internet, which should be secured.


That sort of defeats the purpose of having a smart TV. In addition to my cable TV channels, I also watch Netflix, Amazon TV, YouTube, plus other internet streaming services (such as listening to Pandora Music) through my TV via the internet. If the TV isn't connected to the internet, then I would have no streaming TV service.




Going back to the original OP, I have a question about how this works. If I had a voice-command TV, what part of my speaking is automatically sent over the internet to a third party (Nuance, in this case)? Does it send everything I say, logging in all of those words, waiting for me to say something it recognizes as a voice command?

If so, I would think that a good solution would be that the connection isn't established until I say something like "Hey TV" (or whatever). Once the TV hears me say that, ONLY THEN should it begin sending my proceeding voice commands to the third party. Then I should be able to disengage that sending of data by saying something like "Stop Voice command".


edit on 2017-2-23 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2017 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Much appreciated on this new info for me, kinda makes me wonder though, when aren't we been listening to? Far as I can tell, or estimate....I'd say almost always? If it is not by our own devices, has to be near by ones? Connected ones, etc?
This # ever end?


Anyways, is this what tech has came to? Just eveesdrop on everyone to find and or gain info, for what? Selling purposes?


Anyways....gracias!



posted on Feb, 27 2017 @ 10:25 AM
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I wonder if I can get copies of those files. The Mrs. and I have been "having lunch at home" during the week while the kids are away at school.

A couple of those episodes were epic. I hope they got my best side.



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