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Students, staff celebrate after school drops Michelle O lunch rules

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posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: UnBreakable

Are you under the impression that school lunches are mandatory?


No, I know they're not mandatory, Skippy. I believe in personal responsibility, and parents should lead the way. But a lot of parents are 'friends' than 'parents' to their children, and give the kids more free reign than they should get. Leave it up to the kid and most times they'll pick the most fat laden or sugar laden food. That's all I'm saying.


Shoot. I'm not against sugar, but we work pretty hard to keep the extra sugar out of our diet. We buy the natural peanut butter and the jelly that's just the fruit, pectin and juice, etc. There's plenty of natural sugar in a lot of foods that get extra sugar added.

A lot of foods have stuff added that shouldn't be. Ever try buying hot dogs that don't have corn syrup in them at the third or fourth ingredient on the list?




posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: slider1982

I happen to think that employing actual chefs is a great idea, or at least encouraging skill growth, and not just one person to design some sort of national meal plan. Food can be regional, creative, and even exciting.

I'd even like to see the kids have the opportunity to get involved and learn how to cook, observe proper food safety, etc. Those are pretty universal skills that can make a very real difference.

Whatever happens, I think it would be nice to see an effort to make food fun, interesting, healthy, and delicious for everyone involved. Its really not that difficult.

I also find it quite humorous that our only options are apparently either Obama's meal plan or everyone gets fat.


Middle grounds are for sissies!
edit on 20-2-2017 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:14 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

A lot of school districts that ditched the Michelle O plan went with a district chef or dietitian. My nephews' district did this, and the school we use has an in-house cook who makes all their hot meals from scratch with organic stuff. I am not so worried about the food being organic, but I do like that it's all made small-batch onsite by someone whose own children are going to the school.

We usually do a mix of in-house meals and packed lunches from home.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: UnBreakable

Are you under the impression that school lunches are mandatory?


No, I know they're not mandatory, Skippy. I believe in personal responsibility, and parents should lead the way. But a lot of parents are 'friends' than 'parents' to their children, and give the kids more free reign than they should get. Leave it up to the kid and most times they'll pick the most fat laden or sugar laden food. That's all I'm saying.


Shoot. I'm not against sugar, but we work pretty hard to keep the extra sugar out of our diet. We buy the natural peanut butter and the jelly that's just the fruit, pectin and juice, etc. There's plenty of natural sugar in a lot of foods that get extra sugar added.

A lot of foods have stuff added that shouldn't be. Ever try buying hot dogs that don't have corn syrup in them at the third or fourth ingredient on the list?


Exactly. I'm a parent of two kids and introduced the natural peanut butter and fruit jelly, as well as other foods with a lower sugar/salt/fat content. But never once did I deny them a soda, chips, ice cream etc. It becomes a lifestyle and now that they're older they'll grab a bottle of water before a bottle of soda. Sure, they still enjoy their junk food fix, but maybe a couple of times a month rather than every day. And I think they appreciate more that way.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: UnBreakable

But again, I get all kinds of annoyed when the school takes the choice and control out of my hands.

For example, when they ban bake sales or the ability to send cookies with your kid for his birthday ... because MIchelle O's lunch rules ban those kids of snacks. Really? Are they trying to tell me that letting a kid have 1 cookie roughly 20 times in the year is going to completely destroy their waistline and make them obese?!

But that's the way some districts have taken it.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I think something like going full on organic would be more reasonable and realistic if that was reflected in our infrastructure and society in general. I'd like to see it, but doing so in schools at this point may be incurring needless cost.

Thanks for sharing that though. I think that all too often we try to apply a one size fits all philosophy where it has no place.

Of course, I'm an advocate of schools including more real life skills as part of the curriculum, so in some circles I'm quite an outsider (some might say heretic
). That said, I firmly believe that a child will grow up healthier if they know how to grow and prepare their own food than just forcing them to adhere to some universal, boring meal plan.

In large part, I feel it is a parental responsibility but I feel that immersion into the concept of a creative, region-specific approach to food would yield benefits for everyone.

If schools would adopt growing their own food as a standard practice, with the involvement of students, it would probably go a long way in both reducing costs and eating healthy. I think enabling that on a national scale would be a very good thing. Let each school, or school district, dictate specifics but provide a national system for everything from funding to transfer of knowledge.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Huh.

What a novel concept. Personal, or parental, responsibility.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 07:46 PM
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bad at linking and am not adding this garbage to my ats photos
edit on 20-2-2017 by lighter78 because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-2-2017 by lighter78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Quetzalcoatl14

Then move to those countries or pack lunches for your kids.

1) Do you understand that when a person eats unhealthy food as a matter of course their palate changes? You cannot have children eat crap for two meals out of the day at home and most of their lives and them force feed them healthy stuff at school for a limited time and, because the school has a limited budget, healthy food that tastes like crap because it's the cheapest possible, and expect them to like it or want it or eat it.

2) In fact, what you are doing is reinforcing their belief that all health food tastes bad, so that they will be even LESS likely to ever want to eat food that's good for them.

3) Heck my nephews' school district went on Michelle O. rules for a couple years, and my sister cooks all their food mostly from scratch, whole food because she understands that it's more cost effective unlike a lot of people. They get healthy, home-cooked, real food. Those three boys never met a raw veggie they wouldn't slam down or a salad they didn't like, and THEY hated Michelle O's lunch rules. They always came home starving and they said the food stank.


I'll address your points paragraph by paragraph. I number yours for reference.

1) Yes, as other posters have said, there are home life and greater American culture issues regarding palates and unhealthy diets that do make providing healthy food to kids at school more complicated than just giving somewhat healthier meals at lunch tie. Yes you have a point that a more comprehensive strategy is needed.

However, no, you CAN at least attempt to provide healthy food for one meal a day. I'm sorry, your argument here is not solid. Children absolutely need healthy nutrition during their development, and many kids simply aren't receiving that. Those kids that are not are the kids who need most SOME healthy nutrition provided into their lives. As a anti-poverty development practitioner, I have to pore over the evidence of how poor nutrition amongst many other variables inhibits the life opportunities of low income children and individuals.

Furthermore, it is factually true that much of the bad food there is lobbied there by special interests. It's just more horrid crony capitalism infiltrating even our schools and children's lives. Stop justifying it.

2) That is an unproven hypothesis, unless you have evidence to support it. And it's a poor hypothesis to throw out without evidence, in opposition to healthy school lunches.

3) While i am glad for your family's experience, that is anecdotal evidence which classically cannot be provided as evidence for a nation-wide policy for millions of children.

For my seven year old his mother and I cook all kinds of healthy food, and he eats fairly well. However, I still am not comfortable with how sh%tty his school lunch options are on the occasions he needs it.
edit on 20-2-2017 by Quetzalcoatl14 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 08:17 PM
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It seems many are taking this opportunity to brag about how good of parents they are and not confronting the fact the program failed because the food sucked.

This isn't facebook and nobody cares what you feed your kids.
If the kids won't eat her lunch, her lunch program failed.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 08:51 PM
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originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14
I think you are confusing young children for adults.. The law explicitly states that the teachers and schools are "in loco parentis," meaning in place of the parents, which is the exact legal framework which authorizes the educators to teach them, supervise them, and discipline them. Because the children are in their care, it is completely reasonable and legal for decisions such as healthy food versus non healthy food to be made for kids..


Actually, I know what the law is and I know about the doctrine of "in loco parentis." You have described the law accurately. That's the problem. The ability of parents to direct what their children can do has been taken over by the Nanny State, by the government which asserts its power over children and throws the parents to the curb. You VILL DO what the STATE SAYS because the STATE SAYS SO.

And THAT is tyranny. That you so readily succumb to it is what is scary. Long Live Big Brother!



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: c2oden
It seems many are taking this opportunity to brag about how good of parents they are and not confronting the fact the program failed because the food sucked.

This isn't facebook and nobody cares what you feed your kids.
If the kids won't eat her lunch, her lunch program failed.


But that's the point.

The school is taking our option to parent away from us. Many of us are fine parents who feed our kids healthy food, so there was plenty of room for the occasional treat in their diets, but because there are parents who don't understand the concept, our wishes have been overridden by the dictates of the state. Some here think this is perfectly OK and look at those of us who do make a real effort to feed our kids properly but aren't food police about it, and can't seem to understand why we are bothered by having that choice taken from us.

I think it's really sad that there are people who feed their kids horrible food and don't understand the first thing about how to cook their own, but that should be their choice and they should those consequences. It should NOT be the state's place to try to save us from ourselves.
edit on 20-2-2017 by ketsuko because: for some reason a word disappeared while I was writing ... likely forgot to write it



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
Make Merica fat(er) again!




Those carts legitimately piss me off. Our local grocery store has them. They're always being driven by people in their 30's and 40's who are too lazy to walk, and the carts always contain the worst possible stuff they could be buying. The carts themselves get dropped off in the parking lot and left there, the people who take them, don't return them, because that would mean walking to their car. But, they're big and heavy, so they get left behind other peoples cars, who then have to move them.

Before long, all the motorized carts are sitting in parking spaces blocking cars from using them.

The things are a menace. I'm not opposed to someone who really needs help using one, but that's not who does.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:03 PM
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originally posted by: bknapple32
So, really, all the kids were doing was loading up the trays with the free or discounted "approved food" and then tossing in the garbage. Eating what they could from the junk food being sold regardless as extras. Logically, we liberals have to stop and think here. The kids out smarted the system, rather simply. Its pointless. Let them serve whatever they want at this point. Maybe kids will go back to eating an actual meal instead of a bag of Doritos and a couple of cupcakes.

So TLDR: Converted liberal on this issue. Let them eat whatever the hell they want.


Edit: Stupid post posted early.

There's too many diets out there, you can't expect schools to find a one size fits all solution to what students eat. Some are vegetarians, some vegan, some on low carb diets, others on low sugar, some eat plain foods like rice and grains, and so on. Within a year, I expect to see every school having abandoned Michelle's lunch plans, and for good reason.

There are so many ways I could argue this from cost, to choice, to quality. Instead I'm just going to say this: School is about teaching children how to become adults, part of being an adult is choosing what you're going to eat, and planning your own meals. Schools need to offer a variety, so that students can find a diet that they're happy with.
edit on 20-2-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: jellyrev
Healthy food isn't cheap.

I'm ok with taking away pop and fake juice. water costing money in a bottle is a joke.

Veggies taste like crap except when lathered in fat, salt, butter and meat.

IF you want children to eat healthy find a way to take away the pleasure of food.

Most weight gain I've seen of people I know myself included starts in late college, not in school.


I find myself disagreeing. I'm overweight, but I don't eat like a slob, I just don't get enough exercise (and take medications with weight gain as a side effect). I've tried various diets. X calories a day, eating salads, crock pot meals, etc. Lots of vegetables are quite delicious.

The diet i want to try next, that I've seen many people have good success on is a low carb diet. Lots of meat, lots of cheese, lots of other good stuff. But very low carbs. Sadly, it's pretty expensive to do that and I haven't found a way to swing it yet.

What gets children though, is they eat junk food, and then when they hit 20ish their metabolism slows down, and they started to be haunted by the spirits of junk food they've previously eaten. That's when having taught children to make good choices begins to have an effect. What was happening with the school lunches though, is they sold eating healthy as a horrible experience and made people not want to do it.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:20 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
A lot of school districts that ditched the Michelle O plan went with a district chef or dietitian. My nephews' district did this, and the school we use has an in-house cook who makes all their hot meals from scratch with organic stuff. I am not so worried about the food being organic, but I do like that it's all made small-batch onsite by someone whose own children are going to the school.

We usually do a mix of in-house meals and packed lunches from home.


I moved a lot as a kid, sometime around 3rd or 4th grade, I was attending an elementary school that had a large kitchen. Every morning they would make all of the food at that kitchen, and ship it to other districts nearby for lunch time. As far as I know, the food was locally sourced and made by volunteer parents overseen by a chef.

At my private high school we had catered meals 4 days a week (pizza monday/friday, subs tuesday/thursday), on the 5th day, wednesday, parents would come in and cook an actual meal for us. They were great meals, and the only day I always spent my lunch money. I wouldn't necessarily say they were the most healthy things in the world, but they were better than pizza and subs.

Honestly, at that age I don't think you need to go overboard on healthy food. Give people good food that's light on sugar, and you're doing well enough. Something like a Taco Salad for example isn't healthy, but I see no reason why that's inappropriate for kids.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
When I was in school, it was so nasty we looked forward to plastic flavored pizza day.





The Pizzaburger* Lament
Sad but true, isn't it? there were enough calories in a 4 oz.
pizzaburger when I was in high school (healthy fat, real
acids and ugly. linked carbs) to make a 35 cent hamburger
bun full of greasy schmutz worth it. It kept us going and
seemed to offer no resistance to either concentration or
extracurricular athletic pursuits. Inset: half the guys on my
wrestling team went downstate and kicked azz. Three years

I liked the one*s made from bun bottoms . They were
a lot greasier: and thinner like the difference between a '68
Nova and a Chevelle. Same 396 NASCAR motor, same anger.
The guys that trained on steak at home just had posh grease.
The poor guys like me ate at school because the TEAM running
our kitchen knew how to feed kids. And make the inclined win.

For A BUCK we could get the same decent fat and starch in a
12oz sirloin with fries; and wrestle like the 'Night of the Living
Dundees'... eating the salad alter.
Too late now, pass the asparagus ROFL. Item 302: Need some
chlorophyll, suck on this football sonny. Go get some college.

In other words Michelle, you're a commie and you didn't even
know how to feed your own brainless robots: top choice beyotch.

EDIT:: PS and if it means anything, I still have cancer twice--
and at the last check this morning (first time ever colon scrape)
SIX and only that many pre-cancerous puppies in there.

I wouldn't be here, if the food I had as a boy was as bad as now.
Now think of what even a 12 oz. alien butt steak will do to us.
The rules are gone, do you think they favor US? Enjoy your metamorphosis..
edit on 21-2-2017 by derfreebie because: Because Hell .... Hell is for children Patty you yummy person

edit on 21-2-2017 by derfreebie because: Can I stop now? The Devil is a destroyer. But I'm Nuckin Futs



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: mikell
a reply to: ketsukoSchool lunches have always been that way. Parents who cared always packed their kids a lunch.

It's a funny thing though, this obesity epidemic is a more recent phenomena. Maybe if the schools really cared, they'd go back to active, free play recesses and active gym classes for all?

And perhaps the overall culture needs to be changed instead of forcing diet rules on every kid that presupposes the kid is obese to start with and needs a drastic weight loss and aims for that amount of caloric intake.



Are you saying go back to no rules dodge ball. Let the blood and zit juice run.






and there it is right there!

when I went to school we had an hour every day of gym class for the whole school year (9 months), when my daughters went to school they had 1 hour of gym class 3 days a week for 3 months.

people don`t get fat from eating too many calories they get fat from not using enough calories.
if you eat the government recommended calories per day but sit and doing nothing every day you will get fat,if you eat the government recommended calories every day but do a lot of physical activity every day you will lose weight.

there are no 'unhealthy" foods if eaten in moderation and combined with physical activity.
all foods are unhealthy if you pig out and do no physical activity.



posted on Feb, 20 2017 @ 11:54 PM
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originally posted by: IcyPatriot
When I was in high school in the 70's we could buy hamburgers, hot dogs, french fries, hot weiners, meatball sandwhiches, grinders ... ahh good times. I was 6' tall ...110 pounds soaking wet and I could pound 6 hot weiners and 2 cokes with ease.


yep, I bought a hamburger (probably made of rat meat fat and artificial additives) potato chips and tasty cakes every day and I never got fat,but I also didn`t sit on my ass all day either.The only time I wasn`t on my feet doing stuff was when I was sitting to eat and laying down to sleep.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 12:24 AM
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originally posted by: Tardacus

originally posted by: mikell
a reply to: ketsukoSchool lunches have always been that way. Parents who cared always packed their kids a lunch.

It's a funny thing though, this obesity epidemic is a more recent phenomena. Maybe if the schools really cared, they'd go back to active, free play recesses and active gym classes for all?

And perhaps the overall culture needs to be changed instead of forcing diet rules on every kid that presupposes the kid is obese to start with and needs a drastic weight loss and aims for that amount of caloric intake.



Are you saying go back to no rules dodge ball. Let the blood and zit juice run.






and there it is right there!

when I went to school we had an hour every day of gym class for the whole school year (9 months), when my daughters went to school they had 1 hour of gym class 3 days a week for 3 months.

people don`t get fat from eating too many calories they get fat from not using enough calories.
if you eat the government recommended calories per day but sit and doing nothing every day you will get fat,if you eat the government recommended calories every day but do a lot of physical activity every day you will lose weight.

there are no 'unhealthy" foods if eaten in moderation and combined with physical activity.
all foods are unhealthy if you pig out and do no physical activity.


Good grief Tardacus, emphasis in response mine and INDEED ^that.
I don't believe any balanced school lunch has been offered to anybody
under 18 n the last quarter century-- because it looks more like a hot
dog injection of mutated animal matter than food.
Where did we go? Right where we let them lure us. into nutritional poverty.



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