It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Air Force monitoring increased Iodine-131 in Europe

page: 8
84
<< 5  6  7    9  10  11 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 05:49 PM
link   
a reply to: czakalwe

exactly... a confirmed explosion at a nuclear power plant in France.... but everyone instantly assumes/blames russia....
Remember what the french were doing in the Pacific betwenn 1966-1996.... 180 times....
Trust us nothing to worry about..... very Fukashimaish response ... !!


The initial reports were from Norway, near the border with Russia.

Does initial detection point indicate origin?...no...




posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 06:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: CovertAgenda

Does initial detection point indicate origin?...no...


Actually, sort of, yes. Or at least direction of origin, based on when the amounts became detectable.

It was first picked up by stations on the border with Russia. It was later picked up by stations progressively further away. In other words, it was originating from somewhere on the other side of the border and spreading towards, and then across, Europe.

I say "first picked up" but I bet the Russians picked up traces long before anyone else, they just won't tell anyone!

The short half-life (8 days) means that it would only be detectable for a period of about... I think I read somewhere it was 90 days?... from release. So, it's possible that it was from somewhere other than Russia and passed over before hitting a system that took it down through Europe.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 06:32 PM
link   
a reply to: CovertAgenda

I'm sorry, but where has anyone blamed Russia? There has been speculation, based on the fact that Russia has dumped thousands of containers of waste and entire reactors, but i haven't seen anyone blame them. The only thing I've seen is speculation that it wasn't a pharmaceutical leak, and based on the spread it started on Eastern Europe.

So it started in France, went over to Norway, and then spread back to France, and no one reported or noticed it? That doesn't make sense. Just because Norway chose not to report it doesn't mean everyone else would. .



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 06:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: angelchemuel
a reply to: Zaphod58

Just to put this spanner in the thread.......
I posted about this, in fact I linked your thread over on my FB page.
I have a work colleague who's partner is in the USAF.......his partner (who holds a position that would be informed of this plane) has said this plane has not been deployed to the UK and has not landed at Mildenhall or any other US base in the UK

Rainbows
Jane


WC-135, serial 62-3582, call sign COBRA 55 landed at RAF Mildenhall 17th February at 2258 GMT.

The WC-135 was tracked on plane plotter and monitored on radio by aviation and radio enthusiasts in the UK.

It hasn't been noted flying since it landed on the 17th. RAF Mildenhall is monitored 24/7 by aviation enthusiasts.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 06:35 PM
link   
a reply to: tommyjo

Actually some of the spotters i follow were talking about it. From their comments it was believed it headed to Sweden, and it had flown at least once or twice.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 06:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

ohh man secureteam10 is reporting on this so everyone knows what that means...its all a hoax everyone can go home.

just kidding of course


Tyler are you reading our posts?



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 07:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: CovertAgenda
a reply to: czakalwe

exactly... a confirmed explosion at a nuclear power plant in France.... but everyone instantly assumes/blames russia....


Except the problem at Flamanville ("explosion" might be a bit dramatic) was a fire in the turbine hall. It's not a primary loop event. No radiation was released.

eta: Sorry, you guys might not have the same 'news sources'. There is a ventilator system that carries away hot air and, sadly, suspended oil particulates from a part of the turbine that needs forced air cooling. This normally wafts up the stack and out into the air. A sort of sloppy bearing (they think) losing more than a normal amount of oil as vapor, and then eventually as it failed a bit of a spark caused a fire in the oily ventilator, then a flash of the oil vapor in the main part of the vent. It DID go 'bang' and the vent came apart, I guess if you pushed it you might call that an 'explosion', but the salient characteristic of what happened is some fire and a whole lot of smoke.

The injuries of the five workers was from smoke inhalation. Not the 'explosion'. This was in the turbine hall, which is a secondary or "clean" loop system, in addition, the loop wasn't opened, it was a lube oil fire in a vent.
edit on 21-2-2017 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 07:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: CovertAgenda

I'm sorry, but where has anyone blamed Russia?


There is *some* current thought that *someone* might have tested a new design over the Arctic Ocean, where you wouldn't get a seismo trace. And might not get much of a sound event in our hydrophone net, from there anyways. And there might not be as many flash detectors there. And a lot of the effluent would go into the water or be dispersed by the wind. Like that "other" thing that never happened. And maybe no one hangs around there for a long time so no one saw it. And there's not much in the way of tech to be damaged by the local EMP.

Maybe.

We would have subs that would have heard...something. If that were true. Might not have known what to make of it. At the time.

But it's all really really speculative at this point. It could still be a whoopsie at a Polish pharma plant. I'd rather that be true.
edit on 21-2-2017 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 07:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

i thought we were trying to keep those DOE spooks away from our humble ATS. it seems pretty clear what went down.


large amounts of a fission product, sniffer jets and most importantly.....silence



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 07:49 PM
link   
Um. When, exactly, did the hub-bub start up in Antarctica?

The conjugate point would have been down there somewhere.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 08:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58
'I'm sorry, but where has anyone blamed Russia?'
Well actually what I said was 'assumes/blames Russia', to have covered either option you were bound to comment upon. But OK lets play word-master and stick with speculate then...

In the first two pages....
Reactor leak in a Russian Boomer?
Some of their ships are in disrepair. Just look at their carrier. Trying to put to sea with out dated and damaged equipment is begging for an accident.
Kola has lots of cold war Era subs moldering away.
That could mean, though not necessarily so, one of those subs that've been sitting for years...is leaking?
Let me guess another crapy russian sub has broke.....
Pure speculation of course. I am however moderately confident with my initial response to it being a sub or other soviet era rustbucket that wasn't properly decommissioned.

Enough yet?

Maybe go back and read Lagomorphe's post... some great info there, and some background on the french info suppression in the past.
And look at
www.irsn.fr...
Strange how Spain has such high levels considering how far away it is from the initial detection points? Could you please speculate given your perspective.
Very high in Poland...

'So it started in France, went over to Norway, and then spread back to France, and no one reported or noticed it? That doesn't make sense.'
It only 'doesn't make sense' because we haven't yet factored in lag times for detection, evaluation and dissemination. Also how many different agencies are involved? How many different countries? How many are not even reporting? How many have vested interests? How many different procedures/processes?And how many different instruments are being used and the related calibrations? And that's not even considering the related meteorological conditions.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 08:53 PM
link   
a reply to: EvillerBob


Actually, sort of, yes. Or at least direction of origin, based on when the amounts became detectable.

Well actually and statistically, NO, you will need more than one reading to indicate direction (at least a second reading to confirm) . And then factor in meteorological conditions.


It was first picked up by stations on the border with Russia. It was later picked up by stations progressively further away. In other words, it was originating from somewhere on the other side of the border and spreading towards, and then across, Europe.

That's assuming a linear progression related to the reporting outcomes, methinx one needs to factor in lag times for detection, evaluation and dissemination from varied sources (as well as cross-comparability of data).


I say "first picked up" but I bet the Russians picked up traces long before anyone else, they just won't tell anyone!

I would add to that and say that would be the MO of most of the countries involved.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 08:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam
I really do hope you are right and it wasn't an 'explosion' and that 'no radiation was released'.... but unfortunately silence or outright lies tends to be most countries MO.



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 09:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam


The conjugate point would have been down there somewhere

I like your way of thinking....

edit on C2017vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 21 Feb 2017 21:03:09 -060028PM9America/Chicago2 by CovertAgenda because: add



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 09:12 PM
link   
a reply to: CovertAgenda

Well, let's see...there are 17000 containers of waste, 2 nuclear powered ice breakers, 4 reactors, and an unknown number of subs sitting and rusting after being decommissioned.

Yes, it's evil of us to even speculate that this might be coming from Russia. Those would never ever leak.
edit on 2/21/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2017 @ 09:12 PM
link   
Ive been watching this thread with interest
its quiet windy here in the north east of england at this moment the wind is north westerly and my geiger counter has been averaging 24 counts per minute down to 19 cpms then around an hour ago it peaked at 45cpm i decided to check on the wind direction and its showing north westerly I went onto earth.nullschool.net.../wind/isobaric/1000hPa/orthographic=13.20,50.88,3000/loc=-1.891,55.493 and thought oh well the wind isnt coming in from europe but then i panned out and looked to see where the wind is mixing i see the wind coming from across the Kara sea mixing with wind from the Atlantic the Kara sea just happens to have a great deal of soviet era nuclear waste dumped in it and then i read that a gas pipeline is being proposed and that explorative work for radioactive dumps have to be looked at before pipe work could ever be undertaken www.bbc.co.uk...
A full K47 nuclear sub was scuttled there now i wonder is this area the true source for the radioactive Iodine 131 spike earlier this year and if so this may well be a much bigger problem than just radioactive iodine I truly hope i and my geiger counter are very wrong

edit on 2/21/2017 by astra001uk because: Spelling (as usual)



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:32 AM
link   
I've been following this topic for a couple of days, wondering why we (here in Europe) haven't heard about it. Today it finally came in the papers with a headline that reads "what has Russia been up to?"
Curious to see if this will make the evening news on tv....



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 04:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: CovertAgenda
a reply to: Bedlam
I really do hope you are right and it wasn't an 'explosion' and that 'no radiation was released'.... but unfortunately silence or outright lies tends to be most countries MO.


It's sort of silent in the MSM, but there's a lot of detail in the back channels. Oil vapor flashover in a vent from one of the turbines, a very smoky fire, five smoke inhalation injuries, minimal damage, some sheet metal work, bearing replacement, some burnt wiring, a bit of maintenance and some paint and it'll be back up to par.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:29 AM
link   
The WC-135 took off from RAF Mildenhall this morning at 1156 GMT. Call sign FLORY 58. KC-135 tankers are in support and was last noted heading to pass over Aberdeen, Scotland.

Info from UK aviation enthusiasts monitoring RAF Mildenhall, flight tracking software and radio communications.



posted on Feb, 22 2017 @ 06:33 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: tommyjo

Actually some of the spotters i follow were talking about it. From their comments it was believed it headed to Sweden, and it had flown at least once or twice.


Nothing moves from RAF Mildenhall without the aviation enthusiasts catching it. The WC-135 has been parked up ever since it arrived at Mildenhall. This morning it took off on its first mission with tanker support following.

The WC-135 took off from RAF Mildenhall this morning at 1156 GMT. Call sign FLORY 58. KC-135 tankers are in support and was last noted heading to pass over Aberdeen, Scotland.

Info from UK aviation enthusiasts monitoring RAF Mildenhall, flight tracking software and radio communications.







 
84
<< 5  6  7    9  10  11 >>

log in

join