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Suing the Weather Forecast for false predictions.

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posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:54 PM
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Weather is very unpredictable.

We've all gotten our wardrobe mixed up due to false weather predictions.
You dress all skimpy, and it starts storming and hailing, as if Thor ate Thai takeaways the night before.
Not good.

But should you be able to sue the weather forecast, if they get it wrong?

I mean, they are making predictions without disclaimers.

Or is the disclaimer just implied, and any rational person should know it's not dependable.
Perhaps with astrology columns, but this claims to be science?

Well I agree with this lady who sued a weather center for getting it wrong.
They predicted sunshine, but then it rained and she got sick.
She dressed for their prediction, and they told her wrong.
Yes, they do owe her compensation!

prezi.com...




edit on 16-2-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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Damn Right !!

Sue the SOBs.

It never fails when you wash your car on a predicted Sunny Day, it RAINS an hour later !!




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Yeah but no.

Surely a prediction isnt a stated fact?

No but yeah?



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Nope.


Nope, and more nope.


Every single lawyer who thinks this is a good idea should lose their license.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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yeah sue em!

with all those expensive satellites and fancy computers and they still can`t accurately predict the weather 2 days from now.
the weather people around here are consistently wrong in their guesses.

They always guess that the weather 5 days from now will be warmer than it actually is, and as the day gets closer they keep lower their guess until they guess too low.

At the very least they should be able to accurately predict the weather 3 days from now.

it`s one of the few "professions" where you get paid whether you re right or wrong, win or lose.
edit on 16-2-2017 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-2-2017 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

A weather forecast is like a fisherman, casting as far as he can, hoping he lands a fish.

Edit: Tell you what though, I lived outdoors for periods of time and after a while you can tell what the weather is going to be like that day , 100 percent of the time.

As far as indoors people, don't listen to the weather on TV unless they are covering a current weather story, they don't know from tomorrow anymore than you do.


Weatherman: (looks out window) "Uhhh, the weather is mainly outside , looks like it will remain that way the rest of the day."

edit on 16-2-2017 by intrptr because: edit:



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Right on.

And it is pain and suffering schlepping two jerseys and a jacket about for nothing.

You're sweating like a scene from a labor camp, because that's exactly what you've done - due to a false prognosis.

In the army sure - put more rocks in my rucksack.
I knew I would suffer.

But it's not the army anymore.
You're supposed to make my life easier!
edit on 16-2-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:17 PM
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Yuh don't dress for anything until you sniff the air. This is plain stupid, it's a forecast...only meant to be a guide at best, even in this day and age. besides general forecast usually have a pointer to more local weather updates.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:19 PM
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Suing people for not being able to predict the future? Hmmm...

Just for the record, the definition of "forecast" includes both the words "predict/prediction" and "estimate". How can they be liable because someone took their literal predictions and estimates as fact?



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:25 PM
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a reply to: SecretKnowledge

Just for internet argument's sake...What about when they forecast a hurricane and subsequently cause mandatory evacuations - but they are wrong?



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:30 PM
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For "normal" weather I like this: it covers all bases.



If misfortune should befall you, and the sky opens, change the icon to this:



Voila, a weather report.

Fake news, don't even start.
Freshly adjusted news, more likely.

And they got somebody in a suit to tell you the obvious.
Nice disappearing act when it's not so obvious.
edit on 16-2-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Good points, but without deviating into etymology, words and their meanings (forecast, foreskin, foreclosure?) you know my brother: what a man says on TV in a suit must be true.

OK, we all know it's not.

But it's supposed to be.

Some dude knows what's going on.
Thank heavens!
Well, that's what it looks like.

The sun is going to shine.
But bring a raincoat.
edit on 16-2-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:53 PM
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Its their own fault for be too stupid to look out a window and unaware of the weather patterns where they live .
Let nature thin the herd .



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:02 PM
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They're more or less suing a computer, because weathermen no longer give their thoughts, they just tell us what the national weather service says which is all based on computer models.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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And look, I concede, they don't always get it wrong.

Shivering in the mornings, and the day could go 18 or perhaps even 40.

Five days out of seven they predict that appropriately.

But woe those days when they stuff up.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

The point I'm making is that the disclaimer is literally in the name. By definition it's no different than if they called it a "weather estimate" or "weather prediction". Do you think they could be sued for making a "weather estimate" or "weather prediction" that turned out to be wrong? Because by definition, that's what a "weather forecast" is.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
a reply to: SecretKnowledge

Just for internet argument's sake...What about when they forecast a hurricane and subsequently cause mandatory evacuations - but they are wrong?

Well nobody got harmed, so....



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Noted, although for exactly the same point I'm arguing there is no disclaimer.

It's not a supernatural, religious or even social report.

It claims to be "weather" - solid, proven science.

Otherwise, why is it attached to the news?
Solid, trustworthy facts, selected and edited by partisans.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

I'm not sure little Johnny should study geography in school.
Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: SecretKnowledge

Argumentatively, I disagree

An informed prediction cannot be factually acted upon?
There goes the insurance industry, or pie in the sky religion.
In fact, there goes the foreign policy of every country in the world.

No!
But yeah.
edit on 16-2-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



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