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Half-brother of Kim Jong-un 'assasinated' in Malaysia

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posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Typo, than.




posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: missed_gear


North Korea is an isolated country because of a despot narcissistic dictator, threatening openly a nuclear strike and has for some while. Unfortunately, under this administration, Kim Jr. is playing with the lives of his own people.

The Northern Korean Peninsula is isolated by the US military, just like Cuba was for (almost) the same amount of time. Soldiers, war ships, embargo and sanctions round out the "isolation".

We even occupy Cuba to this day, google Guantanamo.
edit on 14-2-2017 by intrptr because: spelling ()



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: Agit8dChop

"attacked by the two unidentified women with “poisoned needles”."

Poisoned needles? Were they Bene Gesserit? Obviously the poor guys not the Kwisatz Haderach.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Your coherency is slipping.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:24 AM
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originally posted by: missed_gear

originally posted by: intrptr

Wow.

There, see? Any wonder why these people isolate themselves from the world, developing WMD and high fear about invasion?


North Korea is an isolated country because of a despot narcissistic dictator, threatening openly a nuclear strike and has for some while. Unfortunately, under this administration, Kim Jr. is playing with the lives of his own people.



International relations isn't a one way street though. Sure, we can blame North Korea's government being an oppressive dictatorship as a large contributing factor to the country's isolation, and we would be correct in doing so. But it would also be correct to say that international sanctions on the country and the USA's relationships with former governments which abandoned nuclear weapons are aspects also influencing the isolation.

North Korea, despite its peculiar actions, are logical in their own world view. They are of the opinion that if they relinquish nuclear weapons, they would go the way of Gaddafi or Hussein. Similarly, they see the sanctions as extensions of this 'imperialistic' arm. If the US is willing to place sanctions on the country, then they would be willing to invade it and destroy the reigning government. So, in a sense, it would be correct to say they isolate themselves and develop nuclear weapons because of foreign actions. But it is equally important to remember that they share that blame too.

Like i said, international relations isn't a one way street.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:27 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: intrptr

Your coherency is slipping.

Nice dodge...



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:35 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

On this website? I just got done being trounced for my alternate opinion elsewhere here... so be it.


You won't get trounced if you explain your "Hint":


Hint: start at the occupation by US military of 70 percent of the world nations, focus on the current occupation of Korean Peninsula (snip)


First off...The Korean War was begun as a UN action, not provoked by the United States.
Please do not forget the era either and the fact that China and Russia were also major players as is China today in the North


The United Nations Command (UNC) provided the core military and strategic direction for the anti-communist war effort in Korea.


And


combat roles in Korea. Great Britain, Canada, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Colombia, Ethiopia, South Africa, New Zealand, Turkey, Greece, Thailand, Philippines and Luxembourg sent fighting units. Norway, Sweden, Denmark, India, Italy contributed military hospitals and field ambulances to the cause.


As for the 70% remark, 70% of the 193 nations of this planet the USA occupies? (not including 2 not represented by the UN directly)...

Care to elaborate? Because 'occupation' and 'military presence' are on two different sides of the spectrum.

So 126 Nations are 'occupied'...according to you. I'll concede to two nations as possible obvious answers.

mg



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:38 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: intrptr

Your coherency is slipping.


But the rants are getting better.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: Agit8dChop

I saw an alert from SCMP on my phone a bit ago and when I went to the site, it was not there.

Your aljazeera link is 404'd.

So I don't know.





posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:49 AM
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Back to the topic.

The Malaysian Police have confirmed that the dead man is Kim Jong-Un's brother, but have not confirmed the identity. Other sources have specified that the individual was Kim Jong-Nam. The police are classifying the situation as a "sudden death," stating that the individual had approached a counter in the airport complaining that he felt ill. He was subsequently taken to hospital via an ambulance, where he died en route.

There is, as of writing, no official statements of this being an assassination, let alone one conducted by North Korean agents. The prospect would not surprise me, but as with all things North Korea, it is wise to be cautious.
edit on 14-2-2017 by daaskapital because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: missed_gear


First off...The Korean War was begun as a UN action, not provoked by the United States.

First off, the UN was hijacked in its infancy by the powers that be. The so called super powers been picking on the little guy ever since.

They do it in the UN security council, you know, the special countries room? The regular room where all the other countries meet has little say there.

The UN was supposed to give each nation one vote to prevent what happened in WWII from ever happening again, i.e., one nation (Nazi Germany) gobbling up lesser nations in a bid for world dominance.

Wanna run that Universal excuse by me again?



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Good god, intrptr, everybody knows that the US picked up the pieces of the world at the start of WWII, and helped get it back into a coherent form. Where would the world be if the Nazi had won the globe. Where it be if the USSR had spread communism everywhere with its then brutal regime?

Some of us know this history because we have lived through it! Where you got your interpretation of it, I have no idea.

You usually have pointed, salient, comments to add to threads. Let us not lose that.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:20 AM
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Big Brother Kim was not a fan of dynastic rule, and has been rather opposed to it, family or not. Methinks that stance got him the poison needles on Fatboy Kim's orders, not the US'. That's got to be a perceived threat of internal & public demoralization if ever there was one -- Dear Leader's sibling NOT on board with the family dynasty doesn't look good.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: intrptr

Good god, intrptr, everybody knows that the US picked up the pieces of the world at the start of WWII, and helped get it back into a coherent form. Where would the world be if the Nazi had won the globe. Where it be if the USSR had spread communism everywhere with its then brutal regime?

Some of us know this history because we have lived through it! Where you got your interpretation of it, I have no idea.

You usually have pointed, salient, comments to add to threads. Let us not lose that.



The US wasn't even involved during the first years of WWII. In fact, much of the allies had already done a lot of the heavy lifting before the US got involved, and the USSR was instrumental in combating Nazi Germany in the final push. You act as if the US was the sole bulwark against the forces of Nazism and Communism, when in actual fact it was only one influential player among many others.

All this considered, it has nothing to do with the thread itself.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:39 AM
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Ah, the old days of cloak and dagger.
Ya got love it.
It all boils down to perception.
Somebody let them dogs out. (Smile)

Buck



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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I`m sure north korea will blame south korea for the assasination



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
This, after Trump responds to North Korea's missile launch with what the New York Times calls "uncharacteristic restraint."



"Uncharacteristic restraint?"...Or deer in the headlights?

He is taking heat from National Security for pow-wowing at the public dining room of Mar-Largo when N. Korea launched the test missle.

People were posting pics of a Classified meeting on FB.

This assassination is highly relevant, because the Chinese were keeping the Half-brother "in-pocket" to replace Kim-Jon-un in case he went full bat# crazy...Kim-Jon-un has just taken that option away from them.
edit on 14-2-2017 by Indigo5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: missed_gear


North Korea is an isolated country because of a despot narcissistic dictator, threatening openly a nuclear strike and has for some while. Unfortunately, under this administration, Kim Jr. is playing with the lives of his own people.

The Northern Korean Peninsula is isolated by the US military, just like Cuba was for (almost) the same amount of time. Soldiers, war ships, embargo and sanctions round out the "isolation".

We even occupy Cuba to this day, google Guantanamo.

Oh ... come on ...

The North Koreans share borders with South Korea, China and Russia. They have access to sea lanes.

The South Koreans have a border with North Korea ... that's all .... and they're gettin' along just fine with just that.

ETA: And Geeze ... they got two spies out of the country (with poison needles even) to go and kill somebody with.
edit on 1422017 by Snarl because: ETA: LULZ



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

If the US had pulled its finger out of its ass and joined the rest of the Allies at the start of the war instead of selling the Nazi's Oil, bank loans and refeshments then im sure countless lives would have been saved.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: daaskapital

North Korea, despite its peculiar actions, are logical in their own world view. They are of the opinion that if they relinquish nuclear weapons, they would go the way of Gaddafi or Hussein. Similarly, they see the sanctions as extensions of this 'imperialistic' arm. If the US is willing to place sanctions on the country, then they would be willing to invade it and destroy the reigning government. So, in a sense, it would be correct to say they isolate themselves and develop nuclear weapons because of foreign actions. But it is equally important to remember that they share that blame too.


First, The Hillary-Obama screw-up with NATO in Libya is beyond "off-the-charts" with cover-ups, the UN, France's desire to retain it glory days of controlling NW Africa etc. That is a whole different thread in its' own right.

Iraq has been discussed to infinitum on ATS.

Now as for Qaddafi and Hussein possessing limited nukes as a 'deterrent' pre-invasion/attacks?

Simply, it would not have mattered.

The assumption that is being presented is that a small limited nuclear arsenal is a deterrent.
A paranoid parallel is being drawn by the PDRK that Libya was 'disarmed' as prelude to an invasion tactic.

What does matter:
Regime stability with nukes in hand.
Relative ability to attack the US Homeland.
Threats to preemptively use these small batch nukes based on a paranoid fear of 'invasion'.
Ability to share the product with other nations which may use them in plots merely to destroy citizens, cities and/or threaten other nations.
Threaten NATO nations and US Allies with a nuclear attack.

With nukes added to the N. Korean equation, the rules change dramatically and the consequences to N. Korea are unimaginable if they decided to use just one from their arsenal in an attack of any nature.

Kim using nukes as a diplomatic ploy and threat to keep his regime, is a very very dangerous game.

Sanctions are a punishment not unlike to a child misbehaving, now if said misbehaving child had a gun waving it around, can he/she still be 'punished'..yes. Now, is this same child threatens to use the gun, this situation will end in violence or disarming.

mg



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