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Should an opiate overdose mean the suspension of your drivers license?

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posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 06:08 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace
I can see a disturbing effect of this kind of legislation. Namely, if a person is aware that going to a doc, an ER or calling paramedics following an overdose will result in them losing their driver's license for at least 90 days, some might decide not to seek medical aid when they could really need it. Rather than risk losing their license, they might choose instead to risk losing their lives.

That's a pretty appalling situation. People with drug use issues should be encouraged to seek medical help and hopefully get into a treatment program, but this new law (if passed) will effectively discourage them.

A person with a suspicious or cynical perspective of TPTB (like eg yours truly) might think that maybe this is part of the intent behind the proposed law.

If anyone wants to peruse the full text of the bill, they can download (or read online) a pdf copy of it via eg this page at Legiscan .com.

The Bill's section 3. (1) (c) is also relevant here, because it goes further than just the cases of "overdose" mentioned earlier in the Bill:

KRS 186.570 is amended to read as follows:
12 (1) The cabinet or its agent designated in writing for that purpose may deny any person
13 an operator's license or may suspend the operator's license of any person, or, in the
14 case of a nonresident, withdraw the privilege of operating a motor vehicle in this
15 state, subject to a hearing and with or without receiving a record of conviction of
16 that person of a crime, if the cabinet has reason to believe that:
[Note: I am leaving out (a) and (b) as they are not directly relevant to this thread. JM.]
22 (c) That person has a mental or physical disability or opioid addiction that makes
23 it unsafe for him to drive upon the highways.

(Note: the bolded, underlined and italicized phrase is in the original document.)

In other words, if a person is known to be an opioid addict -- or the cabinet has "reason to believe" they are! -- then even if they are not currently a user they can still have their driver's license taken away and would have to provide evidence to get it back. And the cabinet does not need proof. Just a reason to believe. But the person who is the subject of that "belief" would have to provide evidence that their "reason" is incorrect.

Scary stuff. And again, this is not very helpful in trying to get people into medical care and on addiction treatment programs.

edit on 14/2/17 by JustMike because: of typos. You can mentally fix any others yourselves.




posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: JustMike

Overdose on opiates????? You all have prescriptions or what???

That's a pretty insane situation to get yourself in....I know people who have thrown their lives completely away without getting their license taken away.

They can still take their pills just don't overdose. And for that, they would need official hospital documentation of an overdose for it to even get that far.

You know what happens to an epileptic when they have a seizure? They lose their license. Even if it's in the comfort of their own home and they haven't had any for years. License is suspended. And that's not 90 days it's indefinite (state of California - Believe me I know). That's a real disease!

Overdose is a strong word. And DUI's....you get a couple and we have a problem...obviously. License should be suspended.

That is just my opinion....



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 07:48 AM
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Sounds like these legislators OD'd.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Drug use is not a disease. It is an addiction, a choice.

If people can't learn to control the when, what and amount of stuff they use--an impossibility since the purity of illicit drugs is never known, then they should get whacked if they get caught out in a stupor or driving poorly.

Shouldn't that be a no-brainer? You know, sorta like you get a DUI for alcohol abuse.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 08:23 AM
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I am against laws like this. It is strictly punitive and not preventative, plus it is what government does when agendas mandate growing government power while reducing the power of the people. Eventually liberty and freedom are crushed to the point of being like prison inmates. Already getting closer to being there. After this law if passed, will be more and more and more worse ones. Prison planet. Government is becoming more and more just like the fictional "skynet" hooked into everything, and trusted to run it all. Any power the government assumes over the people, it will exercise that power without regard for casualties or fallout. Laws like these are stepping stones and we are 3/4 of the way along that path already.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:11 AM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: EternalSolace

Sad. Opiate addiction is a disease, not a crime. Punishing addicts won't help the problem one bit!

Are a lot of people getting injured by opiate users driving under the influence while overdosing?

yes they are had a friend two weeks ago overdosed with his GF and her baby in the car flipped four or five times her and baby survived he is dead and she just overdosed again



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:14 AM
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I dont know about the country most of you are from , but in the US such medication comes with A WARNING
Warning : Do not drive or operate heavy machinery while taking this medication



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: HarryJoy
It would be equivalent to losing your license for getting passed out drunk at home.....I don't think you would ever see that go anywhere.

Passing out drunk is way different thing than a od you will wake up on your own at some point from being drunk of you die noone has to call an ambulance if you pass out drunk



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Another case of criminalizing disease.
edit on 14-2-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:21 AM
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originally posted by: lordcomac
...shouldn't an opiate overdose render you dead? Seems pretty irrelevant, I'd like some back story on how this law came to be proposed. Probably sufficiently covered by existing law, but what all I know? Law is a mess.

I'll go with no, since I also don't believe in overzealous law enforcement.

However, I'll also say that if you are pulled over for breaking traffic law and happen to be tripping balls on opiates, you are far more worthy of punishment than an out of state passerby who is trying to keep up with traffic in Georgia.
I'm from new England and was almost fired from a # job because I got a speeding ticket years prior while driving in the slow lane in a # state (my antique car couldn't keep up with traffic, even) and I'm bitter over it. "Super speeder" laws are about the dumbest thing I've ever heard of.
I hate dumb law enforcement.

You can survive an overdose if medical treatment is given quick enough. Heck I had a friend OD on a car hood for the entire night and wasn't found until morning. That was his second time. He had to learn how to walk and talk again though. Unfortunately that still didn't save him and the third time he didn't survive. Had another friend OD in my other friend's bathroom with his foot propped against the door. The sad thing is, they had no clue he was using and were carrying on and having a good time downstairs. And then when they found him, they had a hellava time trying to get that door open because of his foot. He's still alive though. Haven't heard how badly it messed him up though.

Criminalizing ODs is very poor form.
edit on 14-2-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:27 AM
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I have ZERO problems with this. Instead of being reactive they are being proactive. Those that are legally prescribed this should not be affected if they don't choose to abuse that power. You have to remember that this is an illegal drug that when abused can have deadly consequences. I know, I know...you are going to bring up alcohol and other items which is true but I'm strictly staying on topic and discussing the OP at hand.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:28 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: EternalSolace

Drug use is not a disease. It is an addiction, a choice.

Spoken like someone who has never been around an addict before. Opiates are literally known to restructure your brain chemistry so that you physically crave them or your have severe withdrawal symptoms. Even alcohol has nasty nasty withdrawal symptoms that can even straight up kill you. Just because YOU can handle moderation doesn't mean that addiction isn't a disease. That's just pure arrogance talking.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: HawkeyeNation

You realize that criminalizing OD's and addiction makes addicts less likely to come forward to seek help for their problems right?



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:35 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: HawkeyeNation

You realize that criminalizing OD's and addiction makes addicts less likely to come forward to seek help for their problems right?


I'm not understanding the logic here. If you have a privilege taken away that you either greatly need or desire then you will try to fix things and get better. To me this is a small slap on the hand but to some it may be there everything and it may lead them to seek the help they need. I see it the other way around to be honest. I'm not sure how losing their license will prevent them from wanting to seek help.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: HawkeyeNation

Logic doesn't work that way when you are in the throes of addiction. When you are addicted, you know you've been breaking the law and society frowns on your activity. So you strive to keep it a secret until it blows up in your face. This is how you'll have things where people dump ODing people outside of hospitals so they don't have to take responsibility for these things.

You aren't addressing the root of the problem here and making people ashamed of something that at this point in their lives they can't help. Consider this. Portugal decriminalized all drugs in 2001. Since then drug overdoses and addiction rates have plummeted. That's because they treat these people like humans who have a real problem instead of society's waste.

These are simple facts that are playing out today. Yet we keep banging our head against the wall with the "tough on crime" shtick that didn't work in Prohibition and it doesn't work now. It's depressing how these forgotten people can get kicked around by society all because of a habit they picked up (and now can't kick) that society disapproves of.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: HawkeyeNation

Logic doesn't work that way when you are in the throes of addiction. When you are addicted, you know you've been breaking the law and society frowns on your activity. So you strive to keep it a secret until it blows up in your face. This is how you'll have things where people dump ODing people outside of hospitals so they don't have to take responsibility for these things.

You aren't addressing the root of the problem here and making people ashamed of something that at this point in their lives they can't help. Consider this. Portugal decriminalized all drugs in 2001. Since then drug overdoses and addiction rates have plummeted. That's because they treat these people like humans who have a real problem instead of society's waste.

These are simple facts that are playing out today. Yet we keep banging our head against the wall with the "tough on crime" shtick that didn't work in Prohibition and it doesn't work now. It's depressing how these forgotten people can get kicked around by society all because of a habit they picked up (and now can't kick) that society disapproves of.


Very good response. Much appreciated. It is hard for me to go to that place having never really dealt with it personally or really anyone closely connected. You made some very good points.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

No.

If government is so bored that they have to come up with idiotic, redundant laws to justify their time, then they can go out and rake the yard or wash the car.

Idiots.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: HawkeyeNation

I've had two friends die from ODs and one friend I don't see anymore because his mom blames us for giving him the drugs (even though we don't use and didn't even know he was using; he just happened to od in my friend's house).

You just don't know what they are going to do next. One day you can all be chilling and having a great time at the bar, the next day you get a phone call and learn that your friend ODed in the city because he had left the bar and went by himself to go cop.

Even when you try to confront them and ask them about it, many times they'll deny it or lie. It's tough and these laws really show a disconnect from the people writing them and what is happening on the streets.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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I was in the local pharmacy a few moths ago to pick up a prescription.
The young woman in front of me was acting like a heroin addict 'jonesing' for a fix. She was wringing her hands and bitching out the two people behind the counter because they weren't filling her Fentanyl patch prescription quickly enough.
She had a toddler with her. After she finally got her patches, she went out to her car, put the toddler in a car seat, appeared put a patch on and drove away.
Should she be driving a kid around while using that?
I honestly don't know.
But when I saw her acting like a heroin addict, it 'raised my feelers' so to speak.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: EternalSolace

Drug use is not a disease. It is an addiction, a choice.


Physical tolerance to and dependence upon a medication or narcotic is absolutely not a choice. You can't simply turn off certain receptors in your brain because their proper functionality becomes inconvenient. There are certain compounds derived from poppies and coca plants that have been proven to alter brain chemistry. In some instances these changes are irreversible.


If people can't learn to control the when, what and amount of stuff they use--an impossibility since the purity of illicit drugs is never known, then they should get whacked if they get caught out in a stupor or driving poorly.


Except that this law isn't about people driving under the influence of illegal or prescription narcotics. They don't have to be anywhere near a vehicle and they will lose their license based entirely on the belief that the person may be addicted to a narcotic. There is no due process. Nobody has to be convicted of a crime. They only have to be suspected of being a drug addict and they can lose their driving privelages.


Shouldn't that be a no-brainer? You know, sorta like you get a DUI for alcohol abuse.


But you don't get a DUI for alcohol abuse. You get it for operating a motor vehicle while your ability to do so properly is impaired by consuming alcohol. That isn't what this law proposes. A closer analogy would be that if you agree with this law then you also believe that everytime someone gets fall down drunk while in their own home should be charged with a DUI and have their license immediately suspended.

How is any of the above a "no-brainer"? Or are you generally in favor of denying people their normal 4th amendment rights? Is due process no longer an important part of our legal system? Are we going back to the days of reefer madness where proof isn't necessary and we just need to be able to state that we believe someone might be a junkie so let's take their licenses and make it difficult to keep a job or get treatment for their alleged addictions? If this is where we are moving as a nation under Trump then I really fear for my children.




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