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Should an opiate overdose mean the suspension of your drivers license?

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posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:05 PM
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An opioid overdose could result in a loss of driving privileges in Kentucky.

Sen. John Schickel, a Boone County Republican, introduced Senate Bill 123 on Tuesday. The bill would require a doctor, a nurse practitioner, a paramedic or an emergency medical technician to report opioid overdose patients to the commissioner of the Department of Vehicle Regulation in the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

The cabinet would then notify the overdose patient that his or her license was suspended.

Read more here: www.kentucky.com...=cpy


Opioid overdose could mean losing driver’s license if Kentucky bill passes Read more here: www.kentucky.com...=cpy

If this bill passes in the state of Kentucky, it doesn't matter whether you're driving or not. If you're reported to have overdosed on opiates, you will lose your drivers license for at least ninety days until a doctor certifies you're safe to drive again.

I'm significantly anti-government when it comes to the use of drugs and alcohol. If you're in your own home or residence, and are of no danger to the general public, have at it. It's one place where Darwin shines. That said, if you're convicted of driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, I can 100% back this bill. But that's not the case. If you've overdosed at all, you'll lose your license. Whether you were driving or not.

Do you all believe that an opiate overdose should automatically mean the suspension of your license whether you were driving or not?




posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

My first thought is what about all of the people who are legally prescribed opiates? Are their licenses affected?



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Sad. Opiate addiction is a disease, not a crime. Punishing addicts won't help the problem one bit!

Are a lot of people getting injured by opiate users driving under the influence while overdosing?



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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I'm in recovery myself, I don't think this makes sense. Big government involved as usual. More often then not if your alone and overdose you really won't need that license. If you OD in your car, sure then I can see it because it's in close proximity and you may have been driving. I think that's already a law, Under the influence.



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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...shouldn't an opiate overdose render you dead? Seems pretty irrelevant, I'd like some back story on how this law came to be proposed. Probably sufficiently covered by existing law, but what all I know? Law is a mess.

I'll go with no, since I also don't believe in overzealous law enforcement.

However, I'll also say that if you are pulled over for breaking traffic law and happen to be tripping balls on opiates, you are far more worthy of punishment than an out of state passerby who is trying to keep up with traffic in Georgia.
I'm from new England and was almost fired from a # job because I got a speeding ticket years prior while driving in the slow lane in a # state (my antique car couldn't keep up with traffic, even) and I'm bitter over it. "Super speeder" laws are about the dumbest thing I've ever heard of.
I hate dumb law enforcement.



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: windword

The state senator, I believe, stated that it's not a big issue in his county. Here's his quote,

I think especially in Louisville and Northern Kentucky, the epidemic of opioid overdoses has been to such an extent that this measure would be a good step in trying to ensure public safety,” Warren County Commonwealth’s Attorney Chris Cohron said. “Because so many times, individuals are operating a motor vehicle when they obtain illegal drugs and will almost immediately use them, it puts all lives on the road in danger.


I don't know what the actual statistics are or whether it's an actual problem. Sure, people drive under the influence of alcohol. That leads to the probability that people will drive under the influence of opiates. But does that mean that someone who's overdosed without driving should face that penalty?



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

My first thought is... Would you be ok with people you loved killed by someone driving while impaired by opiates legal or illegal?
If they overdosed its a clear indication of abuse and addiction especially if prescribed...
So I believe taking away their licence after an overdose is very wise and a step in the right direction for public saftey as well as a wake up call for those suffering from the addiction...
Furthermore besides losing their license they should have to undergo an extensive detox program and medical testing at regular intervals afterward to both reclaim and maintain their renewed license...

edit on 13-2-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: EternalSolace

Sad. Opiate addiction is a disease, not a crime. Punishing addicts won't help the problem one bit!

Are a lot of people getting injured by opiate users driving under the influence while overdosing?



Alcohol addiction is also classified as a disease... Should alcoholics who drive under the influence also not be punished?

What about under the influence of weed, or any number of other drugs?

It's hard to draw the line, but if we insist on having traffic law that line must be drawn.



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:27 PM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: EternalSolace

Sad. Opiate addiction is a disease, not a crime. Punishing addicts won't help the problem one bit!

Are a lot of people getting injured by opiate users driving under the influence while overdosing?


Well, if they're shooting up, it would allow a distinction of extremes. And hinder their ability to easily go get it.



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:41 PM
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They do the same with any drug charge, for 180 days in some places, last I knew.

And that is unrelated to any driving offences.



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:43 PM
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It would be equivalent to losing your license for getting passed out drunk at home.....I don't think you would ever see that go anywhere.
edit on 13-2-2017 by HarryJoy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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No ... a dui fine but u don't need new dui laws

This is for what the war on drugs how dose this help anyone

Taking a divers licence away never seemed logical it's not related to ANYTHING unless ur crime is driving related

The crime of driving under the influence is aredy covered and they in fact can suspend it licence for it

So why the f@$! Do they need another law to cover what's aredy covered



posted on Feb, 13 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Surely drug depenence and overdose is a medical issue.

Opiates are cheap and easy to produce.

A medical prescription at a reasonable price undercuts the profitability of criminal suppliers and allows for the addiction to be safely managed towards a cure- and it's a whole lot cheaper than accommodation and law enforcement that the current non-solution requires.

There is a saying that the definition of madness is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome than it always has.

Surely the criminalisation of those involved with controlled substance issues is madness.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

I don't know. I tend to have conservative leanings. That said, conservatives are ass backwards when it comes to individual rights concerning drugs and alcohol. If you're convicted of a DUI or DWI of alcohol or drugs... yes. Take their license and make them responsible under the full force of the law.

However, if you're in your own home or domicile, then no, you shouldn't loose your license over such use.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Absolutely not.

There are all ready too many laws by the Authoritarian Government already exist. In fact, you can use existing DUI laws to deal with this problem.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 03:13 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

I don't believe any of this kind of thing. These events, and all the others they've dreampt up over time and those they will dream in the future, have nothing to do with the safety of the community.

IMO it has everything to do with the state using things like this as a means of extending their control and oversight of the nations people and their lives.

Why do I say that?

Because they use their claim of concern for the community to get the community to agree to ever more control and surveillance of individuals in return for noting really.

We should always put their claims up against a comparative measure. In this case a reasonable comparative measure is personal financial security.

Here's a couple of questions for you.

Do you think your govt cares as much about your financial security as they seem to care about your personal physical security??

Do you think the your govt cares just as much about the physical and financial of the homeless as they do for the rich and their personal security?

cheers



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 05:13 AM
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originally posted by: windword
Sad. Opiate addiction is a disease, not a crime. Punishing addicts won't help the problem one bit!


It's not a punishment really. It's a way to get people off the road who could be dangerous. The same with some people with epilepsy and who are not allowed to drive.

I guess if an addict can show they are clean and no longer a risk when they are driving then they can get their licence back. If they cannot then they should not be allowed to drive. So treat it like a medical problem and stop them driving.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 05:17 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Heroin is just as much, if not more, inclined to reduce reaction time behind the wheel than alcohol.

So Yes people found to have overdosed on opiates should indeed have there licence suspended.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 05:20 AM
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Of course this law makes sense.

You can lose your license for a period just for getting dizzy spells. A doctor is required to report you to the DMV in my state if you tell them you have been getting dizzy or passed out.

People in my area are overdosing on heroine daily. Every week there are reports of people found dead, often in their cars.

And this affects kids:

Couple overdose on heroin in a McDonald's parking lot while their three-year-old son is in the car

Mother Overdoses After Snorting Heroin with Baby in Car, Prosecutors Say

Becomes Famous Rookie 911 Operator Helps Deliver Baby Rookie 911 Operator Helps Deliver Baby Headlines Cops: Photos of Adults Overdosing With Child, 4, in Car Shed Light On 'Epidemic'


An Ohio officer driving behind an erratically moving SUV discovered two nearly unconscious adults police believe were on heroin traveling with a child in the backseat.


Of course it could be argued that someone who would break the law doing heroine is not going to be too concerned about driving without a license.


edit on 2/14/17 by BlueAjah because: eta

edit on 2/14/17 by BlueAjah because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 05:26 AM
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It's all about the money and getting you in the system. Michigan was going to take Professional licenses away on your second DUI what did they really end up doing they took your motorcycle license away ??? You can't take a Dr or lawyers licence away now can you.




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