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Church of Scientology grants high ranking members the ability to murder people

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posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 03:20 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

I think all super citizens have the right to kill those further down the socioeconomic ladder.

Only a short while ago there was a post on this site about a spur of the moment comment from a member of the NYPD when they said that guns without serial numbers are reserved for the elite.




posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 03:39 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

Again... there are some issues with wording here.

No citizen has the right to kill another, simply because one occupies a higher position within society. They can tell themselves that they do, they could even be told that they do, the courts may even find themselves lacking evidence, when they would convict someone else on much less than they have. Its happened before.

But they do not ACTUALLY have the right to do a damned thing that the regular citizen cannot do. Language which normalises the sometimes inexplicable behaviour of the elite, does not aid in combating that behaviour, in much the same way as giving the same platform to Nazis that we do to advocates of equality, does not aid the world in ridding itself of fascist scum.

The language we use in circumstances like these is absolutely vital to ensuring that we do not deepen a problem by uttering forth upon it.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 06:45 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears

i mean what?
bunch of freaks man
Indeed the talk you point at is crazy crap. However for all interested in the subject who does not want to be over-hyped is good to know the roots of scientology. I don't know in what Frankenstein it grew up but in its beginning it was just the "atheist's cult to universalism" and it was not so grose and idiotic. It was pretty rational with minimal freaking out. Just mentioning.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 07:15 AM
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They actively tried to recruit celebrities because they were in a position to influence a lot of people. Get the gullible celebrities to believe that they can control Theta Beams that will make them float (or whatever they believe) and you'll get a lot of people that listen to these idiots every word.

Imagine if Oprah was a part of this!? Easy to lead sheep if you are the only one that can see where you are going. Mindless idiots follow celebrities. Think Jenny McCarthy and her autism/immunization link that was never true, how many believed that because she had the public forum? It's scary to realize how much power over the public these entertainment monkeys have!



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 07:38 AM
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Once declared a suppressive person, you are an enemy of the church and all means (legal and otherwise) are justified to discredit and ridicule you. L. Ron Hubbard framed this into their edict. The church is absolved of blame or guilt for the games they play.

The church is become its own worst enemy at that point.
edit on 14-2-2017 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

This is purely speculation on my behalf, but I always found the death of his mentally challenged son to be a bit suspicious. From what I recall the details were a bit contradicting then it all went away as a simple mishap. This new information, if true, adds fuel to my previous suspicions.

I can't think of any reason to kill his child but perhaps it fell under "ethics protection" criteria?

Sure freaking hope not!

Edit it seems that drowning and seizures is a common way for people within the church to die:




Heribert Pfaff (31)
Room 758

According to the records, Heribert P. died august 28, 1988, during the night from a heavy epileptic attack. He hit his head on the night table. The scientology doctor reports that he prescribed vitamins for his patient -dispite regular attacks- in stead of treating him with proper medication. Such medication was indeed not detected in his blood during the post-mortem examination.

...

Josephus Havenith (45)
Room 771

An autopsy report lists his death as "probable drowning" but notes that his head was not under water. He died in February 1980 at the Scientology Fort Harrison Hotel in a bathtub filled with water so hot it had burned his skin off.

www.xenu-directory.net...


Then there is Travolta's son who drowned while having a seizure...


A murky and complex affair, it centres on the tragic death of Travolta’s autistic 16-year-old son Jett, who suffered a seizure and hit his head on the bath at the family’s holiday home in the Bahamas, in January last year.

www.dailymail.co.uk...


Things that make you go hmmmm....

Seems like they need a new playbook.
edit on 14-2-2017 by Mikehawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

"really interested in how people can fall for this #? " They came to my county fair, had a booth set up, and some guy tried to recruit me. I had just finished reading Going Clear, the book about which the movie was based, and let him know in polite terms I knew what they were and why they were much worse than they appear. I am a retired Naval Officer and in Going Clear it was interesting to me to read about L Ron Hubbard's naval career. What Scientology claims about his military record is complete nonsense. However, he based the organization foundation largely on the Navy. From the SeaOrg to billeting, uniforms, acronyms, and other organizational things.

Anyone, and I mean anyone, who is considering entering this cult should read Going Clear. It is written by a formal member and certainly takes the shine off of the propaganda the "church" promulgates. To a lesser degree, I have been binge watching the Hulu tv show The Path. It is about a fictional cult that is pretty much based on Scientology and among other things impresses the family restrictions and impacts. Scientology, as Ms. Remini emphasizes ruins families and creates much regret and pain among families that have a member who decides to quit the church. It is terrible and borders on illegal in my opinion. Scientology is a sham. It steals family savings, breaks up families, kidnaps people, harasses other people, commits assault, enslaves and preys on vulnerable people who have no where else to turn for food and shelter. It is terrible.



posted on Feb, 14 2017 @ 06:26 PM
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Off topic, since high ranking scientologists can fly, teleport themselves, start fires with the power of their minds, etc etc, what sort of superpowers would you get if you were bitten by a radioactive John Travolta?



posted on Feb, 15 2017 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: TobyFlenderson


originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
Not sure if it is a well known fact, but L. Ron Hubbard was active in a branch of Alister Crowley's church in California.


It's called a "Lodge" not a Church. This is a very important distinction and should not be over looked.
edit on 15-2-2017 by LeftieArcade because: error



posted on Feb, 15 2017 @ 02:07 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: Azureblue

Again... there are some issues with wording here.

No citizen has the right to kill another, simply because one occupies a higher position within society. They can tell themselves that they do, they could even be told that they do, the courts may even find themselves lacking evidence, when they would convict someone else on much less than they have. Its happened before.

But they do not ACTUALLY have the right to do a damned thing that the regular citizen cannot do. Language which normalises the sometimes inexplicable behaviour of the elite, does not aid in combating that behaviour, in much the same way as giving the same platform to Nazis that we do to advocates of equality, does not aid the world in ridding itself of fascist scum.

The language we use in circumstances like these is absolutely vital to ensuring that we do not deepen a problem by uttering forth upon it.


I agree 100%, my bad, my apologies. I was talking tongue-in cheek, but yes its not good form to talk in a way that deepens and normalises the unwanted behaviour.

thanks for bringing it up.



posted on Feb, 15 2017 @ 08:01 AM
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originally posted by: lawman27

Off topic, since high ranking scientologists can fly, teleport themselves, start fires with the power of their minds, etc etc, what sort of superpowers would you get if you were bitten by a radioactive John Travolta?

You made me spit out my coffee...

I heard that's how Nicolas Cage got his acting powers.



posted on Feb, 15 2017 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: superman2012

And describing Nicolas Cage as 'acting' made me spit out my coffee!



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
i mean what?
bunch of freaks man


Scientology is about happiness and fulfillment. When one attains their personal goals, protecting that accomplishment becomes a priority. As we all should know, there are people on the opposing end who attack that fulfillment. In recent years this has tested us to extremes rarely, if ever, presented to us before. Hence, such extreme measures.



posted on Feb, 18 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

I've always been fascinated by this cult and why some very prominent and famous people join.



posted on Feb, 19 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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Can Elvis be my martyr too?




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