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Mexican Citizen Sentenced To 8 Years In Prison For Voter Fraud

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posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: infolurker

I wonder if citizens who have been found to have voted in 2 counties or states will also receive an 8 year sentence.




posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: infolurker

I wonder if citizens who have been found to have voted in 2 counties or states will also receive an 8 year sentence.

Hopefully.
Especially if they admit to it in court.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

No, we are not debating it. I am giving facts and you are covering your ears. A debate would be you providing alternative evidence. So please show me evidence hispanic immigrants are integrating as fast as everyone else.

And why are you still asking about context when I posted the link to the actual 444 page article already?



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Grambler

Yes. Obama's immigration policy was nuanced. Is that supposed to be a bad thing?


In this case yes.

Are you really claiming he attempted to secure the border? So we are to ignore all of the people that work at ICE that say how vulnerable the border is?

What exec order did he pass to secure it? None. And yet he managed to pass orders allow illegals to stay, and do nothing about sanctuary cities.

Hell even the Dems made the same argument that you initially made, that we need to deal with fixing the immigration system first then deal with the border.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: neo96

And they were in Central and South America first, not North America. So they can go back there if they like.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: infolurker

I wonder if citizens who have been found to have voted in 2 counties or states will also receive an 8 year sentence.


I agree with butcher. Voter fraud is voter fraud, regardless of your legal status.

I am not sure that 8 years is the right punishment, maybe like three years.

But if the precedent has been set with this woman, then thats what everyone should get.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

First off. The Washington Times' opinion isn't a fact. Second off, quoting a phrase out of context isn't indicative of it being a fact either. So bare with me. I'm still going through the report you gave me. I found an interesting tid-bit so far though:

As discussed throughout the report, family and household circumstances, as well as the general climate toward immigrants and the policy environment that immigrants enter, are critical in determining patterns and processes of social and economic integration for the second generation and beyond. In addition to the parents’ own legal status, age and date of arrival, and time spent in the United States, other key variables affecting the integration of the second generation include whether both parents were foreign-born; what language is spoken at home; household socioeconomic and demographic composition; and general indicators of parental health, education, occupation, and income. In addition, more distal variables such as the general policy environment toward immigrants (welcoming or restrictive), neighborhood characteristics, the types of schools attended; and the availability and quality of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) programs and other social and health services affect immigrant integration and should be measured with respect to immigrant-descendent generation.

In general, resources accessible to children within the household while growing up can be expected to play an outsized role in determining the
Page 424
Suggested Citation: "10 Data on Immigrants and Immigrant Integration." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Integration of Immigrants into American Society. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21746.
×

nature and extent of their later integration into American society. For older children of immigrants who no longer live at home, of course, a specific question on the birthplace of parents is required to identify members of the second generation but rarely is much additional information gathered about the parents or the family in which they came of age. Despite this information gap, circumstances in the family of origin are nonetheless critical to understanding current trajectories of integration among adult members of the second generation, underscoring the need for longitudinal data in studies of immigrant integration, especially in the second generation.

The second generation may be identified in one of two ways. Minor children of immigrants are easily identified as long as they remain in the household of their immigrant parents, who are themselves identified from the birthplace question. The adult children of immigrants, however, must be identified using a separate question on the birthplace of parents: a question that was asked on every Decennial Census from 1870 to 1970 but was eliminated on the 1980, 1990, and 2000 census forms and was not included on the ACS in 2010. Since 1996 a parental birthplace item has been asked in the March supplement to the CPS, but the small sample size makes it difficult to create reliable estimates for most second generation immigrant populations (for one potential method, see Ramakrishnan, 2005), especially at the state and local level. There are other limitations to the CPS that limit its usefulness for substate-level analysis: more than a third of county level identifiers are not available in the public release of the CPS due to concerns about privacy; other data might be available only through a handful of restricted data centers

At present there is no reliable source of information on adult second generation immigrants based on a large, nationally representative sample. As noted in Chapter 6, because the U.S. Census Bureau data relies on self-identification of race and Hispanic origin and because identity is related to socioeconomic status, the identification of the second and especially the third and higher generations may be increasingly inaccurate and may introduce systematic errors in measurements of intergenerational mobility.

To fill the gap, private organizations led by the Russell Sage Foundation have funded a series of specialized surveys of second generation immigrants in San Diego and Miami (Portes and Rumbaut, 2014), New York (Kasinitz et al., 2008), and Los Angeles (Brown et al., 2011). Telles and Ortiz (2008) used a survey of Mexican Americans in California and Texas, originally conducted in 1965, and then relocated the original respondents and their descendants. They demonstrated that having information on biological generations—tracing great-grandfathers, grandfathers, fathers, and sons—yielded a different trajectory of integration than measuring generation as time since immigration and examining cross-sectional differences among individuals of different immigrant generations but similar age cohorts. In
Page 425
Suggested Citation: "10 Data on Immigrants and Immigrant Integration." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Integration of Immigrants into American Society. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21746.
×

addition, Grusky and colleagues (2015) recently recommended the creation of an “American Opportunity Study” to develop the capacity to link records across the Decennial Census, the ACS, and administrative records (see Box 10-1). These linkages would significantly enhance researchers’ ability to monitor social mobility across generations, a key component in the measurement of immigrant integration. Overall, the lack of a parental birthplace on the ACS and its absence from the 1980-2000 census long forms constitutes a huge gap in the nation’s statistical system and is the largest single barrier to studying the intergenerational integration of immigrants (Massey, 2010). As the third generation grows in size, the lack of a question on grandparents’ place of birth also means that researchers are unable to trace intergenerational integration as it advances beyond the
children of immigrants. During the greatest period of mass immigration since the early 20th century, when the population of immigrants rose from 14 to 40 million and the second generation proliferated, the nation has lacked a reliable means of assessing the progress and characteristics of the children of immigrants.

Seems to be saying that it is REALLY hard to check how second and third generation immigrants are naturalizing because we don't have reliable ways to determine where their ancestors immigrated from. Still reading though, but that is already putting cracks in the Times' position.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Grambler

What does a "vulnerable boarder" mean exactly?



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:00 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Grambler

What does a "vulnerable boarder" mean exactly?


It means that it is open to all sorts of people crossing it. Some people well intended that are just illegal immigrants, some not so much like drug dealers.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: Grambler

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Grambler

What does a "vulnerable boarder" mean exactly?


It means that it is open to all sorts of people crossing it. Some people well intended that are just illegal immigrants, some not so much like drug dealers.

So how is that any different than how the boarder has always been? The country didn't fall apart before, why is it suddenly under threat now? Heck, Obama wasn't even the first to give deference to the illegals. Reagan legalized tons of them, and his policy was just a blanket legalization. no nuance on who is and isn't allowed to stay. Just legalize all of them across the board.
edit on 10-2-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Logical fallacy. Nothing to do with what I stated. What does it being difficult have to do with it being true? Nothing. Maybe you want to show me where I went wrong, feel free to quote where they say they are integrating at the same speed.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I said that is something to look at so far, I'm still reading the report. What part of "Bare with me"? Do you not understand? You want me to read your evidence yet you are rushing my opinion without being able to vet it. Are you actually saying, "Just agree with me!"? Because that is how it is coming across.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:12 PM
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Page 314


The current evidence suggests that the second and third generations are integrating linguistically at roughly the same rates as their historical predecessors, with complete switch to English and loss of the ability to speak the immigrant language generally occurring within three generations (Alba et al., 2002; Alba, 2005; Portes and Hao, 1998). However, there are differences based on immigrants’ first language; specifically, Spanish-speakers and their descendants appear to be integrating more slowly in terms of both gaining English language and losing the ability to speak the immigrant language than other immigrant groups (Alba, 2005; Borjas, 2013).


So nothing has changed for almost all immigrants .. but Spanish speaking immigrants are not integrating the same way every other group throughout US history has.
edit on 10-2-2017 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Then next time don't post an opinion until you finish reading.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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It's also shown that illegal immigrants are more segregated and integrate less.

That's a double whammy for Illegal spanish speaking immigrants.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: Grambler

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Grambler

What does a "vulnerable boarder" mean exactly?


It means that it is open to all sorts of people crossing it. Some people well intended that are just illegal immigrants, some not so much like drug dealers.

So how is that any different than how the boarder has always been? The country didn't fall apart before, why is it suddenly under threat now? Heck, Obama wasn't even the first to give deference to the illegals. Reagan legalized tons of them, and his policy was just a blanket legalization. no nuance on who is and isn't allowed to stay. Just legalize all of them across the board.

You are preaching to the choir. Both Republicans and Democrats are responsible. In some ways Obama was worse, but to me he just continued the open border policy of Bush, Clinton, Bush, and Reagan.

Lets see what ICE thought of Obama.


Chris Crane, president of the National Immigration and Customs Enforcement Council...

“The day-to day duties of ICE agents and officers often seem in conflict with the law as ICE officers are prohibited from enforcing many laws enacted by Congress; laws they took an oath to enforce,” he said. “ICE is now guided in large part by influences of powerful special interest groups that advocate on behalf of illegal aliens.”


www.theblaze.com...< br />
Morale at ICE was at all time lows under Obama because they felt they were being forced to ignore the law.

But again, what does it matter if Obama was worse than Bush or not.

Politicians have been promising for over 25 years they would secure the border, and it has never happened.

Hence 15 million or more illegals in the country.

So yes, we should secure the border, as has been promised for 25 years, before working on the legal immigration system.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: Tranceopticalinclined
a reply to: infolurker

8 years and 5,000 dollar fine?

But rapists and murders only get 5 or less. ( yes do a search for each, 5 years for physical violence some people get and this women gets 8 years for voting wrong? )


Yeah, the US really needs to start bringing the hammer down on violent criminals, life sentences of hard labor, expand the death penalty, etc. I absolutely agree with you there.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: Tranceopticalinclined
a reply to: infolurker

8 years and 5,000 dollar fine?

But rapists and murders only get 5 or less. ( yes do a search for each, 5 years for physical violence some people get and this women gets 8 years for voting wrong? )


Well, 8 years is just the duration of Trump's 2-term presidency.

They let her out just in time for the next next elections, so she can help the democrats get back into the White House.

That's the plan.

They just want to make sure, she can't vote in 4 years when Trump is up for re-elections.



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: infolurker

I wonder if citizens who have been found to have voted in 2 counties or states will also receive an 8 year sentence.


One could only hope!



posted on Feb, 10 2017 @ 01:04 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker

Looks like an example is being set for voter fraud. It will be an interesting few years if there is actually an effort to go find the fraudsters and charge them.

dfw.cbslocal.com...




He points out his niece has spent almost her entire life in the U.S. Her attorney said she has a learning disability and was confused about the difference between being a citizen and a legal resident, so she thought she was allowed to vote.

“The jury didn’t believe that story. They believed that the defendant knew exactly what she was doing, and they responded accordingly,” Prosecutor Jonathan White said.

White told CBS11, when Ortega tried to register to vote in Tarrant County, she admitted she was not a citizen, so her application was rejected. When she told them she had already been voting in Dallas County, that’s when investigators started looking into her case. Defense attorney Clark Bidsall said his client’s case has been politicized and now Ortega has a difficult road ahead even after her sentence.

“Once she gets out of prison and she’s deported, does she bring her four minor children to Mexico? As a mother I think that would be a difficult choice for her,” Birdsall said.

“It’s going to be a big impact for them because now they’re going to have to go over there to visit their momma,” Felipe Ortega added.

Prosecutors said whether this case prompts elections officials to verify citizenship is an issue for the legislature. CBS11 asked Dallas elections officials to comment on the case, but they have not gotten back to us.

The jury also gave Ortega a $5,000 fine.



That's one (if the report is accurate), now we only need 4,999,999 more ...



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