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Today Iraq, tomorrow the world

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posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:16 PM
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Tissue?
"Naysayers".....awesome article.
The worlds smallest violin has been struck and its sounds fall on deaf ears, Kidfinger.


seekerof




posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by dgtempe
Ok, since there was some victory today in Iraq as far as voting and the democratic process, I would say there is no stopping George W. Bush now in his quest for world domination.

What say you?



There is a long way before democracy of the western type is accepted in these countries. It's not important that democracy was forced on their throats. They have to understand it, to feel it, in order to accept it. Unfortunately, their 5000 year traditions says otherwise.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by masterp

Unfortunately, their 5000 year traditions says otherwise.



Yesterday's election was the most openly contested vote in modern times in an Arab state and will certainly be far freer than anything we will soon see in Egypt, or Syria, or Saudi Arabia.

The US and Coalition forces provided security, at the painful cost of more lives - and about eight million of the nearly 14 million registered voted.

(That is roughly the same as America's vote last November, which was the highest in the U.S. since 1968 and took place without any risk of being shot by a sniper or blown up by a car bomb)

So much for the argument that Arabs don't want democracy.


Rebekka

[edit on 31-1-2005 by Riwka]



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Riwka

Originally posted by masterp

Unfortunately, their 5000 year traditions says otherwise.



Yesterday's election was the most openly contested vote in modern times in an Arab state and will certainly be far freer than anything we will soon see in Egypt, or Syria, or Saudi Arabia.

The US and Coalition forces provided security, at the painful cost of more lives - and about eight million of the nearly 14 million registered voted.

(That is roughly the same as America's vote last November, which was the highest in the U.S. since 1968 and took place without any risk of being shot by a sniper or blown up by a car bomb)

So much for the argument that Arabs don't want democracy.


Rebekka

[edit on 31-1-2005 by Riwka]


Oh, I never said they don't want it. They just don't know how to use it. Democracy is based on respecing each other's freedoms and differences. These people are not born with those principles; it is just not part of their system of beliefs.




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